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Just wondering if there is a slicker way to subset a data.table. Basically I have a big table with millionish rows and hundreds cols. I want to subset it based on an integer col/s having a value between a range defined by me.

I was wondering if the set the relevant column as the Key it would be binary search but then not sure if I can find the rows between a range of values.

Contrived example below.

> n = 1e7
> dt <- data.table(a=rnorm(n),b=sample(letters,replace=T,n))
> system.time(subset(dt, a > 1 & a < 2))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.596   0.000   1.596
> system.time(dt[a %between% c(1,2)])
   user  system elapsed 
  1.168   0.000   1.168 

can something like this be done?

setkey(dt,a)
dt[  ] : get me the rows between 1 and 2 values of the key

Thanks! -Abhi

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between will not save any time because it contains the code x >= lower & x <= upper. dt[a > 1 & a < 2] will be just as fast –  Señor O Dec 16 '13 at 21:08
    
how about using setting a key ? I just updated my question not sure I can do a ranged search on a key. –  Abhi Dec 16 '13 at 21:11

4 Answers 4

If you do set the key on a (which will take some time (14.7 seconds on my machine for n=1e7), then you can use rolling joins to identify the start and end of your region of interest.

# thus the following will work. 
dt[seq.int(dt[.(1),.I,roll=-1]$.I, dt[.(2), .I, roll=1]$.I)]


n = 1e7
dt <- data.table(a=rnorm(n),b=sample(letters,replace=T,n))
system.time(setkey(dt,a))
#  This  does take some time
# user  system elapsed 
# 14.72    0.00   14.73
library(microbenchmark)
f1 <- function() t1 <- dt[floor(a) == 1]
f2 <-  function() t2 <- dt[a >= 1 & a <= 2]
f3 <- function() {t3 <- dt[seq.int(dt[.(1),.I,roll=-1]$.I, dt[.(2), .I, roll=1]$.I)]   }
microbenchmark(f1(),f2(),f3(), times=10)
# Unit: milliseconds
#  expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#  f1() 371.62161 387.81815 394.92153 403.52299 489.61508    10
#  f2() 529.62952 536.23727 544.74470 631.55594 634.92275    10
#  f3()  65.58094  66.34703  67.04747  75.89296  89.10182    10

It is now "fast", but because we spent time earlier setting the key.

Adding @eddi's approach for benchmarking

 f4 <- function(tolerance = 1e-7){  # adjust according to your needs
  start = dt[J(1 + tolerance), .I[1], roll = -Inf]$V1
  end   = dt[J(2 - tolerance), .I[.N], roll = Inf]$V1
 if (start <= end) dt[start:end]}
 microbenchmark(f1(),f2(),f3(),f4(), times=10)
# Unit: milliseconds
#  expr      min        lq    median        uq       max neval
#  f1() 373.3313 391.07479 440.07025 488.54020 491.48141    10
#  f2() 523.2319 530.11218 533.57844 536.67767 629.53779    10
#  f3()  65.6238  65.71617  66.09967  66.56768  83.27646    10
#  f4()  65.8511  66.26432  66.62096  83.86476  87.01092    10

Eddi's approach is slightly safer as it takes care of floating point tolerance.

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Doing a setkey here would be costly (even if you were to use the fast ordering in 1.8.11), because it has to move the data (by reference) as well.

However, you can get around this case by using floor function. Basically, if you want all the numbers in [1,2] (Note: inclusive of 1 and 2 here), then floor will provide a value of "1" for all these values. That is, you can do:

system.time(t1 <- dt[floor(a) == 1])
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.234   0.001   0.238 

This is equivalent to doing dt[a >= 1 & a <=2] and is twice as fast.

system.time(t2 <- dt[a >= 1 & a <= 2])
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.518   0.081   0.601 

identical(t1,t2) # [1] TRUE

However, since you don't want the equality, you can use a hack to subtract the tolerance = .Machine$double.eps^0.5 from column a. If the value is in the range [1, 1+tolerance), then it's still considered to be 1. And if it's just more, then it's not 1 anymore (internally). That is, it's the smallest number > 1 that the machine can identify as not 1. So, if you subtract 'a' by tolerance all numbers that are internally represented as "1" will become < 1 and floor(.) will result in 0. So, you'll get the range > 1 and < 2 instead. That is,

dt[floor(a-.Machine$double.eps^0.5)==1]

will give the equivalent result as dt[a>1 & a<2].


If you've to do this repetitively, then probably creating a new column with this floor function and setting key on that integer column could help:

dt[, fa := as.integer(floor(a-.Machine$double.eps^0.5))]
system.time(setkey(dt, fa)) # v1.8.11
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.852   0.158   1.043 

Now, you can query whatever range you want using binary search:

> system.time(dt[J(1L)])    # equivalent to > 1 & < 2
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.071   0.002   0.076 
> system.time(dt[J(1:4)])   # equivalent to > 1 & < 5
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.082   0.002   0.085 
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If you have a key set, then your data is sorted, so just find the endpoints and take the points in between:

setkey(dt, a)
tolerance = 1e-7  # adjust according to your needs
start = dt[J(1 + tolerance), .I[1], roll = -Inf]$V1
end   = dt[J(2 - tolerance), .I[.N], roll = Inf]$V1
if (start <= end) dt[start:end]

This will be a little bit slower than Arun's floor approach, since it does 2 joins, but on the plus side you can plug in any numbers you like.

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given that the rolling joins will only produce a single return value, you can avoid the [1] [.N] subsetting. –  mnel Dec 16 '13 at 23:03
1  
I was sure roll will roll out sooner or later :) –  Arun Dec 16 '13 at 23:05
1  
@mnel that's actually not the case, try data.table(a = c(1,1,1), key = 'a')[J(1), roll = Inf] –  eddi Dec 16 '13 at 23:41
1  
Ah, yes. Good point. (I'd prefer consistency myself in the so that all records which "Match" as defined by roll (i.e. roll = -1 etc), which would avoid the two calls. –  mnel Dec 17 '13 at 0:26

I'm not a data.table expert, but from what I understand the reason a key search setkey(dt, b) ; dt['a'] is so fast is because it uses binary search instead of vector scan. That's not possible for numeric columns where subsetting requires binary operators.

The only alternative would be to do something like:

dt[,Between:=ifelse(a > 1 & a < 2, 'yes', 'no')]
setkey(dt, Between)
> system.time(dt['yes'])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.04    0.00    0.03 

Which, interestingly, is faster even than:

Index = dt[,a > 1 & a < 2]
> system.time(dt[Index])
   user  system elapsed 
   0.23    0.00    0.23 

But since you can just save a subset as a separate data.table anyway, I don't see this having much application.

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