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I have an Int that i want to split into it's individual numbers which ideally would be contained in a list, which i can then process further. So i would like something like this:

split 245
--will then get an list containing [2,4,5]

Is anyone familiar with such a function?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted
import Data.Char

map digitToInt $ show 245
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nice example..! –  jspcal Jan 14 '10 at 4:27
    
so i strap digitToInt onto a show command of a number? –  RCIX Jan 14 '10 at 4:30
    
Yes, if you want to use this approach... Just take care to pass in nonnegative numbers only. Otherwise you'd be passing a '-' to digitToInt, which is an error. Incidentally, John Boker's cool answer has a funkier issue with negative numbers... check it out. :-) –  Michał Marczyk Jan 14 '10 at 4:43
    
Yes, the basic idea of this is that you use "show" to convert 245 to a string, which is a list of characters. Then you map digitToInt over this list of characters, and you get digits in place of characters, so you have a list of digits. –  avpx Jan 14 '10 at 4:44

would the example here work for you ? http://snippets.dzone.com/posts/show/5961

convRadix :: (Integral b) => b -> b -> [b]
convRadix n = unfoldr (\b -> if b == 0 then Nothing else Just (b `mod` n, b `div` n))

example:

> convRadix 10 1234
[4, 3, 2, 1]
> convRadix 10 0
[]
> convRadix 10 (-1)
[9,9,...] (infinite)

to convert haskell radix by mokehehe on Thu Aug 21 08:11:39 -0400 2008
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I'd write it more like convRadix b = unfoldr mModDiv where mModDiv 0 = mzero; mModDiv n = let (q, r) = n `divMod` b in return (r, q) (split across lines, which I can't do in a comment) but it's really all the same :) –  ephemient Jan 14 '10 at 5:01
digits :: Int -> [Int]
digits 0 = []
digits n = digits k ++ [r]
    where k = div n 10; r = mod n 10
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Please edit your answer and put four spaces at the beginning of each line, so it will be formatted as code. –  Yitz Nov 6 '10 at 20:07
digits :: (Integral a) => a -> [a]
digits = flip digits' [] . abs

digits' :: (Integral a) => a -> ([a] -> [a])
digits' n = if q == 0
  then (r :)
  else (digits q ++) . (r :)
  where
    (q, r) = n `divMod` 10

digits   1234  == [1, 2, 3, 4]
digits (-1234) == [1, 2, 3, 4]
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Or digits = fst . head . filter ((==) 0 . snd) . tail . iterate (\(d, n) -> let (q, r) = n `divMod` 10 in (r:d, q)) . (,) [] . abs ;-) –  ephemient Jan 14 '10 at 21:06
digits = reverse . map (`mod` 10) . takeWhile (> 0) . iterate (`div` 10) . abs
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