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Say you have a div, say you color it green and give it a definite width, when I put stuff within it, in my case an img and another div. The idea is that the content of the container div will cause the container div to stretch out, and be a background for the contents. But when I do this, the containing div shrinks to fit the non-floating objects, and the floating objects will be either all the way out, or half out, half in, and not have any bearing on the size of the big div.

Why is this? Is there something I'm missing, and how can I get floated items to stretch out the height of a containing div?

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up vote 188 down vote accepted

The easiest is to put overflow:hidden on the parent div and don't specify a height:

#parent { overflow: hidden }

Another way is to also float the parent div:

#parent { float: left; width: 100% }

Another way uses a clear element:

<div class="parent">
   <img class="floated_child" src="..." />
   <span class="clear"></span>
</div>

CSS

span.clear { clear: left; display: block; }
share|improve this answer
4  
It works, but now I'm twice as confused: is there an explanation for this or is this just how it is? – DavidR Jan 14 '10 at 5:02
2  
Yes, there is an explanation but I have since forgotten it :( Its just how it is. The overflow:hidden forces the browser the best it can to contain the child elements of the parent. Thats why it fixes it. – Doug Neiner Jan 14 '10 at 5:04
4  
I think explanation for overflow: hidden is here: link. And thanks alot, it worked for me – symbolicConstant Feb 27 '14 at 9:16
    
Woot for making parent div float – Nate Flink Feb 10 '15 at 20:30
    
@DavidR The easiest explanation is that html/css is a dated, poorly thought out, and poorly implemented piece of technology. In fact, this reasoning actually explains a lot of html/css quirks you've no doubt encountered since you made this post. – Slight Apr 23 '15 at 16:01

Reason

The problem is that floating elements are out-of-flow:

An element is called out of flow if it is floated, absolutely positioned, or is the root element.

Therefore, they don't impact surrounding elements as an in-flow element would.

This is explained in 9.5 Floats:

Since a float is not in the flow, non-positioned block boxes created before and after the float box flow vertically as if the float did not exist. However, the current and subsequent line boxes created next to the float are shortened as necessary to make room for the margin box of the float.

enter image description here

html {
  width: 550px;
  border: 1px solid;
}
body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: rgba(0,0,0,.15);
}
body:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}
div {
  position: relative;
}
div:after {
  font-size: 200%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  text-align: center;
}
.block-sibling {
  border: 3px solid green;
}
.block-sibling:after {
  content: 'Block sibling';
  color: green;
}
.float {
  float: left;
  border: 3px solid red;
  height: 90px;
  width: 150px;
  z-index: 1;
}
.float:after {
  content: 'Float';
  color: red;
}
<div class="float"></div>
<div class="block-sibling">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec a diam lectus. Sed sit amet ipsum mauris. Maecenas congue ligula ac quam viverra nec consectetur ante hendrerit. Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur. Donec ut libero sed arcu vehicula ultricies a non tortor.
</div>

This is also specified in 10.6 Calculating heights and margins. For "normal" blocks,

Only children in the normal flow are taken into account (i.e., floating boxes and absolutely positioned boxes are ignored […])

enter image description here

html {
  width: 550px;
  border: 1px solid;
}
body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: rgba(0,0,0,.15);
}
body:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}
div {
  position: relative;
}
div:after {
  font-size: 200%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  text-align: center;
}
.block-parent {
  border: 3px solid blue;
}
.block-parent:after {
  content: 'Block parent';
  color: blue;
}
.float {
  float: left;
  border: 3px solid red;
  height: 130px;
  width: 150px;
}
.float:after {
  content: 'Float';
  color: red;
}
<div class="block-parent">
  <div class="float"></div>
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec a diam lectus. Sed sit amet ipsum mauris. Maecenas congue ligula ac quam viverra nec consectetur ante hendrerit.
</div>

Hacky solution: clearance

A way to solve the problem is forcing some in-flow element to be placed below all floats. Then, the height of the parent will grow to wrap that element (and thus the floats too).

This can be achieved using the clear property:

This property indicates which sides of an element's box(es) may not be adjacent to an earlier floating box.

enter image description here

html {
  width: 550px;
  border: 1px solid;
}
body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: rgba(0,0,0,.15);
}
body:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}
div {
  position: relative;
}
div:after {
  font-size: 200%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  text-align: center;
}
.block-parent {
  border: 3px solid blue;
}
.block-parent:after {
  content: 'Block parent';
  color: blue;
}
.float {
  float: left;
  border: 3px solid red;
  height: 84px;
  width: 150px;
}
.float:after {
  content: 'Float';
  color: red;
}
.clear {
  clear: both;
  text-align: center;
  height: 37px;
  border: 3px dashed pink;
}
.clear:after {
  position: static;
  content: 'Block sibling with clearance';
  color: pink;
}
<div class="block-parent">
  <div class="float"></div>
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec a diam lectus. Sed sit amet ipsum mauris. Maecenas congue ligula ac quam viverra.
  <div class="clear"></div>
</div>

So a solution is adding an empty element with clear: both as the last sibling of the floats

<div style="clear: both"></div>

However, that is not semantic. So better generate a pseudo-element at the end of the parent:

.clearfix::after {
  clear: both;
  display: block;
}

There are multiple variants of this approach, e.g. using the deprecated single colon syntax :after to support old browsers, or using other block-level displays like display: table.

Solution: BFC roots

There is an exception to the problematic behavior defined at the beginning: if a block element establishes a Block Formatting Context (is a BFC root), then it will also wrap its floating contents.

According to 10.6.7 'Auto' heights for block formatting context roots,

If the element has any floating descendants whose bottom margin edge is below the element's bottom content edge, then the height is increased to include those edges.

enter image description here

html {
  width: 550px;
  border: 1px solid;
}
body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: rgba(0,0,0,.15);
}
body:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}
div {
  position: relative;
}
div:after {
  font-size: 200%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  text-align: center;
}
.block-parent {
  border: 3px solid blue;
}
.block-parent.bfc-root:after {
  content: 'BFC parent';
  color: blue;
}
.float {
  float: left;
  border: 3px solid red;
  height: 127px;
  width: 150px;
}
.float:after {
  content: 'Float';
  color: red;
}
.bfc-root {
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div class="block-parent bfc-root">
  <div class="float"></div>
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec a diam lectus. Sed sit amet ipsum mauris. Maecenas congue ligula ac quam viverra nec consectetur ante hendrerit.
</div>

Additionally, as explained 9.5 Floats, BFC roots are also useful because of the following:

The border box of a table, a block-level replaced element, or an element in the normal flow that establishes a new block formatting context […] must not overlap the margin box of any floats in the same block formatting context as the element itself.

enter image description here

html {
  width: 550px;
  border: 1px solid;
}
body {
  font-family: sans-serif;
  color: rgba(0,0,0,.15);
}
body:after {
  content: '';
  display: block;
  clear: both;
}
div {
  position: relative;
}
div:after {
  font-size: 200%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  top: 0;
  text-align: center;
}
.block-sibling {
  border: 3px solid green;
}
.block-sibling.bfc-root:after {
  content: 'BFC sibling';
  color: green;
}
.float {
  float: left;
  border: 3px solid red;
  height: 90px;
  width: 150px;
  z-index: 1;
}
.float:after {
  content: 'Float';
  color: red;
}
.bfc-root {
  overflow: hidden;
}
<div class="float"></div>
<div class="block-sibling bfc-root">
  Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec a diam lectus. Sed sit amet ipsum mauris. Maecenas congue ligula ac quam viverra nec consectetur ante hendrerit. Donec et mollis dolor. Praesent et diam eget libero egestas mattis sit amet vitae augue. Nam tincidunt congue enim, ut porta lorem lacinia consectetur.
</div>

A block formatting context is established by

  • Block boxes with overflow other than visible, e.g. hidden

    .bfc-root {
      overflow: hidden;
      /* display: block; */
    }
    
  • Block containers that are not block boxes: when display is set to inline-block, table-cell or table-caption.

    .bfc-root {
      display: inline-block;
    }
    
  • Floating elements: when float is set to left or right.

    .bfc-root {
      float: left;
    }
    
  • Absolutely positioned elements: when position is set to absolute or fixed.

    .bfc-root {
      position: absolute;
    }
    

Note those may have undesired collateral effects, like clipping overflowing content, calculating auto widths with the shrink-to-fit algorithm, or becoming out-of-flow. So the problem is that it's not possible to have an in-flow block-level element with visible overflow that establishes a BFC.

Display L3 addresses these issues:

Created the flow and flow-root inner display types to better express flow layout display types and to create an explicit switch for making an element a BFC root. (This should eliminate the need for hacks like ::after { clear: both; } and overflow: hidden […])

Sadly, there is no browser support yet. Eventually we may be able to use

.bfc-root {
  display: flow-root;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This should be the accepted answer. – Michael_B Sep 24 '15 at 21:43
    
So floated boxes aren't recognized by their parent containers, hence the height collapse, but are recognized by their siblings, hence the clearfix? – symlink Feb 21 at 2:41
    
@symlink Yes, parent containers don't grow to enclose floats, unless they are BFC roots. Siblings which are not BFC roots are not directly affected by blocks (but their line boxes are). However, clearance moves them below any previous float. – Oriol Feb 21 at 2:46
    
"Siblings which are not BFC roots are not directly affected by blocks (but their line boxes are)." - Can you clarify this please? Do you mean that In this jsFiddle: jsfiddle.net/aggL3Lk7/2, the floated inline image is not affecting the span (hence the span's border underlaps it) but the image is affecting the text (which is the line box) as is shown by the fact that the text is not underlapping the image? – symlink Feb 21 at 3:12
1  
@symlink Yes, exactly. Well, in your fiddle the border belongs to the parent, but it would be basically the same for siblings: jsfiddle.net/aggL3Lk7/3 – Oriol Feb 21 at 3:22

Put your floating div(s) in a div and in CSS give it overflow:hidden;
it will work fine.

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I tried that but it didn't solve me issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/25329349/… – SearchForKnowledge Aug 15 '14 at 15:37

There's nothing missing. Float was designed for the case where you want an image (for example) to sit beside several paragraphs of text, so the text flows around the image. That wouldn't happen if the text "stretched" the container. Your first paragraph would end, and then your next paragraph would begin under the image (possibly several hundred pixels below).

And that's why you're getting the result you are.

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How does that have anything to do with the floated element properly stretching the height of the parent? – Slight Apr 23 '15 at 16:02

As Lucas says, what you are describing is the intended behaviour for the float property. What confuses many people is that float has been pushed well beyond its original intended usage in order to make up for shortcomings in the CSS layout model.

Have a look at Floatutorial if you'd like to get a better understanding of how this property works.

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In some cases, i.e. when (if) you're just using float to have elements flow on the same "line", you might use

display: inline-block;

instead of

float: left;

Otherwise, using a clear element at the end works, even if it may go against the grain to need an element to do what should be CSS work.

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W3 recommendation:

put overflow: auto on parent element and it will "color" whole background including elements margins. Also floating elements will stay inside of border.

http://www.w3schools.com/css/tryit.asp?filename=trycss_layout_clearfix

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