Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following python3 program which creates a number of worker processes and kills them when I hit ctrl-c. The master prints a line on the console print('[W] aghhh ... %d' % self.pid) before sending SIGTERM to the child processes. The problem is that that line is output more than once for a given process. Like so (actual console output):

[W] aghhh ... 15773
[W] aghhh ... 15773
[W] aghhh ... 15774
[W] aghhh ... 15773
[W] aghhh ... 15774
[W] aghhh ... 15775
[W] aghhh ... 15776

Question: how can this be? What is the proper way to kill a child process?

the code:

import os
import time
import signal
import sys


class ChildProcess:
  def __init__(self, m):
    self.pid = None
    self.ttl = 10
    self.master = m
    self.pipe_in = None
    self.pipe_out = None

  def hey(self):
    self.ttl -= 1
    self.pipe_out.write('Hello worker %d\n' % self.pid)
    self.pipe_out.flush()

  def tell_me(self):
    msg = self.pipe_in.readline()
    print('[M] Worker process %d says: %s' % (self.pid, msg), end='')

  def live(self):
    r1, w1 = os.pipe()
    r2, w2 = os.pipe()
    pid = os.fork()
    self.pid = pid
    if pid:
      print('[M] Created worker process %d' % pid)
      os.close(w1)
      os.close(r2)
      self.pipe_in = os.fdopen(r1, 'rt')
      self.pipe_out = os.fdopen(w2, 'wt')
      self.master.add(self)
    else:
      print('[W] Worker process ready to rock')
      os.close(r1)
      os.close(w2)
      wr = os.fdopen(w1, 'wt')
      reader = os.fdopen(r2)
      while True:
        wr.write('Hello Master\n')
        wr.flush()
        msg = reader.readline()
        print('[W] Master says %s' % msg, end='')

  def die(self):
    print('[W] aghhh ... %d' % self.pid)
    os.kill(self.pid, signal.SIGTERM)


class Master:
  def __init__(self):
    self.workers = []

  def add(self, worker):
    self.workers.append(worker)

  def rulez(self, nbr=2):
    for i in range(nbr):
      worker = ChildProcess(self)
      worker.live()
    while True:
      for w in self.workers:
        w.tell_me()
        time.sleep(1)
        w.hey()

  def reap(self):
    for w in self.workers:
      w.die()


if __name__ == '__main__':
  master = Master()

  try:
    master.rulez(3)
  except KeyboardInterrupt:
    master.reap()
share|improve this question
1  
You might want use a flag for the while loops in the worker threads, and then set the flag to false when you want to kill the worker. My two cents.. –  Jodgod Dec 17 '13 at 0:20
1  
unrelated to your printing issue: you could create a new session (fork master and call setsid before forking children) then you could kill'em all by sending a single signal to the process group: os.killpg(master_pid, SIGKILL) –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '13 at 4:02
1  
have you tried to run the script with unbuffered standard streams -- -u flag (or call sys.stdout.flush() manually before fork if Python fork doesn't do it already)? –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 17 '13 at 4:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is because the fact that child processes are executing the same code as the parent. So for the child process, when they are doing the while True: wr.write('Hello Master\n') …, if they receive SIG_INT before they are killed by the parent, they will raise the KeyboardInterrupt to the calling method, which is the master.rulez(3).

So, yes, actually there will be up to 4 KeyboardInterrupt raised in the master.rulez(3). You can confirm this by printing something in the except KeyboardInterrupt, or better, print the len(self.workers). Which will produce something like this:

...
[W] Master says Hello worker 769
^C3
2
1
[W] aghhh ... 769
0
[W] aghhh ... 769
[W] aghhh ... 769
[W] aghhh ... 770
[W] aghhh ... 770
[W] aghhh ... 771

Note that each child is forked when the master had probably forked other children, and so there are some other children in the 'self.workers'. So for the first child, this will be empty, the second child this would be 1, the third child this would be 2.

Visualisation of your code (for two workers):

Master
|
|
ChildProcess1 (init)
|
+---------------------+ (fork)
|                     |
self.workers.add(1)   While True: ...
|                     |
|                     (KeyboardInterrupt)
|                     master.reap()
ChildProcess2 (init)  (exit)
|
+---------------------+ (fork) <---- This copied self.workers also, which 
|                     |              already contains ChildProcess1
self.workers.add(2)   While True: ... 
while True: ...       |
(KeyboardInterrupt)   (KeyboardInterrupt)
master.reap()         master.reap()
ChildProcess1.die()   ChildProcess1.die()
ChildProcess2.die()   (exit)
(exit)

To prevent the child from continuing execution of master.rulez(3), you can catch the KeyboardInterrupt in the child process, and then raise sys.exit() there (or it can kill itself using os.kill() also)

Code:

import os
import time
import signal
import sys


class ChildProcess:
  def __init__(self, m):
    self.pid = None
    self.ttl = 10
    self.master = m
    self.pipe_in = None
    self.pipe_out = None

  def hey(self):
    self.ttl -= 1
    self.pipe_out.write('Hello worker %d\n' % self.pid)
    self.pipe_out.flush()

  def tell_me(self):
    msg = self.pipe_in.readline()
    print '[M] Worker process %d says: %s' % (self.pid, msg),

  def live(self):
    r1, w1 = os.pipe()
    r2, w2 = os.pipe()
    pid = os.fork()
    self.pid = pid
    if pid:
      print('[M] Created worker process %d' % pid)
      os.close(w1)
      os.close(r2)
      self.pipe_in = os.fdopen(r1, 'rt')
      self.pipe_out = os.fdopen(w2, 'wt')
      self.master.add(self)
    else:
      print('[W] Worker process ready to rock')
      os.close(r1)
      os.close(w2)
      wr = os.fdopen(w1, 'wt')
      reader = os.fdopen(r2)
      try:
        while True:
          wr.write('Hello Master\n')
          wr.flush()
          msg = reader.readline()
          print('[W] Master says %s' % msg),
      except KeyboardInterrupt:
        sys.exit()

  def die(self):
    print('[W] aghhh ... %d' % self.pid)
    os.kill(self.pid, signal.SIGTERM)


class Master:
  def __init__(self):
    self.workers = []

  def add(self, worker):
    self.workers.append(worker)

  def rulez(self, nbr=2):
    for i in range(nbr):
      worker = ChildProcess(self)
      worker.live()
    while True:
      for w in self.workers:
        w.tell_me()
        time.sleep(1)
        w.hey()

  def reap(self):
    print len(self.workers)
    for w in self.workers:
      w.die()


if __name__ == '__main__':
  master = Master()

  try:
    master.rulez(4)
  except KeyboardInterrupt:
    master.reap()

Result:

...
[W] Master says Hello worker 779
^C3
[W] aghhh ... 779
[W] aghhh ... 780
[W] aghhh ... 781
share|improve this answer
    
You are right it's the fact each child gets a copy of self.workers. die gets called by the master and the subsequently created child processes. for 4 child processes die method gets called 4 times for child 1, 3 times for child 2 and so on. Thank you. –  Imaxd Dec 17 '13 at 19:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.