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I do not know whether the topic highlights my question correctly. However, this is my question. I have a fixed sized array. I feed data into the array using the console. When the array is full, i need to create a new array of same size and begin to fill that array. I do not want to expand the existing array or to declare an array of a larger size. In addition I want to delete those arrays if they get empty. This is related to modeling of hardware memory using C++. That's why I want to use arrays with a fixed size to represent memory blocks.

I have to use manual memory management here. I am trying to model the memory management system in hardware systems. what I want to do is something like this.

DataType array[1024];
int i; 
while(True) 
temp = read_console_input(); 
array[i] = temp; 
memory_manager(); 
endwhile

function memory_manager()
if array.is_full()
DataType array1[1024] = new Datatype[];
set_active_array(array1);
endif
endfunction

Thanks

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Josh Caswell, devnull, Chris, Sean Vieira, Ed Cottrell Dec 17 '13 at 6:23

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
If you need to ask how to dynamically allocate memory you definitely shouldn't be trying to do manual memory management. Take a look at std::vector, it does everything you want, and it won't leak memory. But maybe you want to start off reading a book –  Praetorian Dec 17 '13 at 4:34
1  
It sounds a lot like you want something on the order of typedef char block[fixed_size]; std::vector<block> memory; –  Jerry Coffin Dec 17 '13 at 4:56
    
@Praetorian I have to use manual memory management here. I am trying to model the memory management system in hardware systems. what I want to do is something like this. DataType array[1024]; int i; while(True) temp = read_console_input(); array[i] = temp; memory_manager(); endwhile function memory_manager() { if array.is_full() DataType array1[1024] = new Datatype[]; set_active_array(array1); endif endfunction –  Sameera Hemachandra Dec 17 '13 at 5:22
    
@SameeraHemachandra: Always edit your question and place the code in there. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 17 '13 at 5:28
    
@ThomasMatthews Thank you. I am new to stackoverflow. –  Sameera Hemachandra Dec 17 '13 at 5:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just use std::vector, both for each block and as a container for the blocks.

You're talking about "when the array is full", which implies that you're keeping track of a dynamic size. std::vector does that for you. It also manages memory for you.

A std::vector doesn't become full -- it will just try to reallocate its buffer if e.g. a push_back would exceed the current capacity -- but you can easily add such a limit on top. I would wrap the vector in a class that provided only the relevant public operations

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What I want to do is model memory hardware. When a ram block is full, we have to use next memory block. That is what I am trying to model here. Is there any way to declare arrays on the go? –  Sameera Hemachandra Dec 17 '13 at 5:43
    
Whether you use raw new[] or let a std::vector manage the new[] and delete[] calls for you, there's still a lot of machinery involved under the hood. Maybe a faithful solution of the assignment is to use one big array that you subdivide into blocks. But this is difficult to say without the assignment text. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 17 '13 at 5:46

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