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I have a DataFrame with a column of timedeltas (actually upon inspection the dtype is timedelta64[ns] or <m8[ns]), and I'd like to do a split-combine-apply, but the timedelta column is being dropped:

import pandas as pd

import numpy as np

pd.__version__
Out[3]: '0.13.0rc1'

np.__version__
Out[4]: '1.8.0'

data = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10, 3), columns=['f1', 'f2', 'td'])

data['td'] *= 10000000

data['td'] = pd.Series(data['td'], dtype='<m8[ns]')

data
Out[8]: 
         f1        f2              td
0  0.990140  0.948313 00:00:00.003066
1  0.277125  0.993549 00:00:00.001443
2  0.016427  0.581129 00:00:00.009257
3  0.048662  0.512215 00:00:00.000702
4  0.846301  0.179160 00:00:00.000396
5  0.568323  0.419887 00:00:00.000266
6  0.328182  0.919897 00:00:00.006138
7  0.292882  0.213219 00:00:00.008876
8  0.623332  0.003409 00:00:00.000322
9  0.650436  0.844180 00:00:00.006873

[10 rows x 3 columns]

data.groupby(data.index < 5).mean()
Out[9]: 
             f1        f2
False  0.492631  0.480118
True   0.435731  0.642873

[2 rows x 2 columns]

Or, forcing pandas to try the operation on the 'td' column:

data.groupby(data.index < 5)['td'].mean()
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
DataError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-12-88cc94e534b7> in <module>()
----> 1 data.groupby(data.index < 5)['td'].mean()

/path/to/lib/python3.3/site-packages/pandas-0.13.0rc1-py3.3-linux-x86_64.egg/pandas/core/groupby.py in mean(self)
    417         """
    418         try:
--> 419             return self._cython_agg_general('mean')
    420         except GroupByError:
    421             raise

/path/to/lib/python3.3/site-packages/pandas-0.13.0rc1-py3.3-linux-x86_64.egg/pandas/core/groupby.py in _cython_agg_general(self, how, numeric_only)
    669 
    670         if len(output) == 0:
--> 671             raise DataError('No numeric types to aggregate')
    672 
    673         return self._wrap_aggregated_output(output, names)

DataError: No numeric types to aggregate

However, taking the mean of the column works fine, so numeric operations should be possible:

data['td'].mean()
Out[11]: 
0   00:00:00.003734
dtype: timedelta64[ns]

Obviously it's easy enough to coerce to float before doing the groupby, but I figured I might as well try to understand what I'm running into.

Edit: See https://github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/5724

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3  
This is an excellently worded question! You can bodge this by using a private function: data.groupby(data.index < 5)._cython_agg_general('mean', numeric_only=False), but you need to make it a date again... I think this should probably be a feature request on github. –  Andy Hayden Dec 17 '13 at 7:40
    
Thanks! Not sure what feature to request specifically... that pandas should at least try to run cython_agg_general with numeric_only=False, because sometimes it works? –  ontologist Dec 17 '13 at 18:18
    
That groupby mean etc. should recognise and return dates... I suspect there'll be a more elegant implementation than to use agg_general like that... –  Andy Hayden Dec 17 '13 at 18:33
    
Ah. I was assuming that under the hood pandas was using agg_general and simply only calling it with numeric dtypes. But it's probably more complicated than that. –  ontologist Dec 17 '13 at 22:17
1  
Issue created: github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/5724 –  ontologist Dec 18 '13 at 0:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out this is a pandas issue, this behavior needs to be implemented in groupby.py.

In the meantime, please enjoy this workaround that casts to float (units of seconds):

data['td'] = [10**-9 * float(td) for td in data['td']]
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