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I've been toying with this c program for a while, and I can't seem to figure out what I'm missing.

In the very bottom of my code, I have a function that replaces every other word with a "-". My problem is that when I enter an odd numbered word, such as "Cat", "dog", "hamburger", it will place a "-" in what I think is the null character position, though I have not been able to debunk it.

Thank you for your help!

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>

    void replace(char w[]);

    int main( )
    {
        char w[100], x[100], y[100];
        int z = 0;

    printf("Player 1, please enter the secret word: ");
    fgets(x,100,stdin); 

//    system("clear");  

    while( strcmp(x,y) != 0 )
    {
        strcpy(w,x);
     //   printf("\nLength of String : %d", strlen(w)-1);
        replace(w);
        printf("Player 2, the word is %s\n",w);
        printf("Player 2, please guess the word: ");
        fgets(y,100,stdin);
        z++;
        if( strcmp(x,y) != 0 )
        {
            printf("Wrong. Try again.\n");
        }
        else
        {
            //system("clear");
            printf("Correct!\n");
            printf("It took you %d attempt(s).\n",z);
            switch (z)
            {
                case 1 :
                case 2 :     
                     printf("A. Awesome work!");
                     {break;}

                case 3 :
                case 4 :
                     printf("B. Best, that was!");
                     {break;}

                case 5 :
                case 6 :
                     printf("C. Concentrate next time!");
                     {break;}

                case 7 :
                     printf("D. Don't quit your day job.");
                     {break;}

                default :
                     printf("F. Failure.");
                     {break;}
            }
        }
    }
        getch();
}

void replace(char w[])
{
    int a;

    a = 0;
    while (w[a] != '\0')
    {
        if (a % 2 != 0)
        {
            w[a] = '-';
            a++;
        }
        if (w[a] != '\0')
        {
            a++;
        }
        else
        {
            break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It is better if you give sample input and output that are expected and getting currently. –  Chinna Dec 17 '13 at 5:30
    
if a % 2 != 0 and not end of string, a will increment by 2, is that you want? –  moeCake Dec 17 '13 at 5:32
    
@moeCake That is correct. I am looking to increment "a" by two. –  user3109767 Dec 17 '13 at 5:35
    
@Chinna for instance, if I were to input "Cat" the output is "C-t-" –  user3109767 Dec 17 '13 at 5:39
    
+1 for "debunk". –  Pete Becker Dec 17 '13 at 12:00

5 Answers 5

From the fgets manual;

fgets() reads in at most one less than size characters from stream and stores them into the buffer pointed to by s. Reading stops after an EOF or a newline. If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer. A terminating null byte (\0) is stored after the last character in the buffer.

The newline entered is what you're replacing.

share|improve this answer
    
So you're suggesting that I use something other than fgets()? –  user3109767 Dec 17 '13 at 5:40
    
You can add one more check if string end is newline, replace it with '\0'. –  moeCake Dec 17 '13 at 5:43
    
@user3109767 Not necessarily. You could either remove any newline before running remove by just checking if the last character is newline and if so set it to \0, or you could modify your existing loop to check for line feed to and remove it if found. –  Joachim Isaksson Dec 17 '13 at 5:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can implement like this...

int a;
int len;
a = 0;
len = strlen(w);
if(len%2 == 0)
    len = len-1;
while (len!=a)
{
    if (a % 2 != 0)
    {
        w[a] = '-';
        a++;
    }
    if (w[a] != '\0')
    {
        a++;
    }
    else
    {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That did it. Thank you very much, sir! –  user3109767 Dec 17 '13 at 5:44

I think replacing fgets with just gets will work: Try:

//fgets(x,100,stdin);

gets(x);

and

//fgets(y,100,stdin);

gets(y);

That will be enough I think.

share|improve this answer
    
gets() is frowned upon because it does not do bounds checking and is a security risk from buffer overflow attacks. Trimming the newline off of the results of fgets() is a safer solution. –  woolstar Dec 17 '13 at 5:49

The problem is caused by the additional '\n' character in the char array passed to the replace function.

For instance, when the input is "Cat", the passed char[] w contains {'C', 'a', 't', '\n', '\0'}; The additional '\n' also gets replaced with "-" character.

The following will solve this problem.

while (w[a] != '\0')
{

    if (w[a] != '\0' && w[a] != '\n')
    {
        if (a % 2 != 0)
        {
            w[a] = '-';
        }
        a++;
    }
    else
    {
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As a bit of an aside, can I suggest structuring your replace() code differently

void replace(char charw[])
{
int length=strlen(charw);
int i;
for (i=0;i<length;i++)
    {
    if (i%2==1)  /*yes, i%2 would also work, but lets not get too clever*/
        {charw[i]='-';}
    }
}

This is far more readable. Breaking in the middle of a loop...not so much.

share|improve this answer

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