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i make a single page application. I had read the following article create-crawlable-pushstate. I run just into problems using hashbang. This seems for me like a solution. But im not quite sure if i userstand what is going on there. Here is an example from the article :

// We're using jQuery functions to make our lives loads easier
$('nav a').click(function(e) {
      url = $(this).attr("href");

      //This function would get content from the server and insert it into the id="content" element
      $.getJSON("content.php", {contentid : url},function (data) {
            $("#content").html(data);
      });

      //This is where we update the address bar with the 'url' parameter
      window.history.pushState('object', 'New Title', url);

      //This stops the browser from actually following the link
      e.preventDefault();
}

Thats great but how will google know that the content is available. The getJson function is asynchronous, so the state will be pushed before the content is loaded. My thought was that i call pushstate after content is loaded to show that the link is ready.

  1. In my scenario a user clicks on a href.
  2. Router catch hash change and call a function. (I can overwrite the click event to pushstate after content is generated.
  3. Content will be loaded and generated. (Time pass)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Google doesn't care about the JavaScript. All it sees is the URLs.

Your server still needs to generate the appropriate page for each given URL.

With JS:

  1. Client (browser, googlebot, whatever) asks for http://example.com/whatever/whatever/whatever
  2. Server responds with the page for /whatever/whatever/whatever
  3. Client clicks on link with:
    • href="/something/something/something
    • Ajax</li> <li>preventDefault`
  4. Client loads content with Ajax
  5. Client changes URL to /something/something/something without reloading the whole page

Without JS:

  1. Client (browser, googlebot, whatever) asks for http://example.com/whatever/whatever/whatever
  2. Server responds with the page for /whatever/whatever/whatever
  3. Client clicks on link with:
    • href="/something/something/something
    • Ajax</li> <li>preventDefault`
  4. Client goes to /something/something/something (since there is no JS to trigger the preventDefault)

Then later, someone goes directly to /something/something/something and the same applies. The server delivers the content for /something/something/something directly. Then JS does Ajax stuff when the click a link (if JS is available).

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It doesn't usually matter if the URL changes before or after the content changes have been applied. The only time I can see it being an issue is if it takes a long time for the JS to finish performing the updates and the user copy/pastes the new URL thinking it will go to the old page. Google isn't going to be running the JS (it will follow the regular links), so it doesn't matter at all for Google. –  Quentin Dec 17 '13 at 11:50
    
Content generated by JS won't be indexed. This is why you use pushState (to provide real URLs) and put (HTML) content on those URLs which is indexable. –  Quentin Dec 17 '13 at 11:55
    
Both hashbangs and pushState require you to have the server generate indexable pages. The difference is that, with pushState, the URL the browser sees and the URL that gets indexed are the same. With pushState the URL that the browser loads when arriving is the page the user actually wants to see. With hashbangs, it is the homepage which then runs a pile of Ajax and gets replaced. Moving from hashbangs to pushState eliminated some horrible performance issues Twitter had a couple of years ago because of that. So hashbangs are obsolete. –  Quentin Dec 17 '13 at 12:05
    
Google will not run the JavaScript. It will not suffer delays because the JavaScript takes time to run. It will not get data using Ajax. It will not get URLs to visit by running the JS and seeing the results of pushState or hashbang modifications. It will request /whatever/whatever/whatever, read whatever HTML your server delivers for that, see <a href="/something/something/something">, request /something/something/something, read whatever HTML your server delivers for that, and so on. –  Quentin Dec 17 '13 at 12:34

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