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I am worried this is a bit expensive.

Plus I will soon implement a normalized system for the tags so there will be additional joins.

On top of that I have 4 tables (tbl_videos, tbl_articles, tbl_galleries and tbl_users) of which I want to display three results of each and thus will have to run the query four times on one press of 'search'.

SELECT *, 
(
(CASE WHEN `description` LIKE '%hotel%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `description` LIKE '%london%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `description` LIKE '%lazy%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `description` LIKE '%dog%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) +

(CASE WHEN `title` LIKE '%hotel%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `title` LIKE '%london%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `title` LIKE '%lazy%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `title` LIKE '%dog%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) +

(CASE WHEN `tags` LIKE '%hotel%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `tags` LIKE '%london%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `tags` LIKE '%lazy%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) + 
(CASE WHEN `tags` LIKE '%dog%' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)

) AS relevance
FROM `table`
WHERE `description` LIKE '%hotel%'
  OR `description` LIKE '%london%'
  OR `description` LIKE '%lazy%'
  OR `description` LIKE '%dog%' 
  OR `title` LIKE '%hotel%'
  OR `title` LIKE '%london%'
  OR `title` LIKE '%lazy%'
  OR `title` LIKE '%dog%'
  OR `tags` LIKE '%hotel%'
  OR `tags` LIKE '%london%'
  OR `tags` LIKE '%lazy%'
  OR `tags` LIKE '%dog%'
ORDER BY relevance DESC
LIMIT 0 , 3;
share|improve this question
    
What is the problem you are trying to solve, is it just to search the database for a given search term? What's the process, you have users input data into a search box and then what happens? –  James B Jan 14 '10 at 10:24
    
Its just a standard search, yes. Then like facebook a list of x number of each category is displayed; in my case 3 users, 3 articles, 3 videos and 3 galleries are displayed as results. –  Mark Jan 14 '10 at 10:29
    
So in your example the user has searched for "hotel london lazy dog"? –  James B Jan 14 '10 at 10:57
    
yes...., strange search I know. lol –  Mark Jan 14 '10 at 11:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, this is probably going to be quite resource-hungry, but it sounds like you have a business layer in front of it before you submit the query.

Think about what you want to achieve, and what you could do yourself, in terms of parsing out search terms, or even giving the user separate fields for description, title and tags, and construct the query appropriately, to more direct the query, rather than effectively saying, "I've got some data quite like this search term, somewhere in the columns this table".

Once you have settled on your business logic (and if the above query is how it ends up, although I doubt it, then sobeit), then you should definitely run the query through the explain plan and see where you might pick up some indexes to help the database along.

EDIT:

Okay, so how's this for a suggestion

select matched_val, relevance from (
    select description as matched_val, count(*) as relevance
    from table 
    where description like '%hotel%'
    or description like '%london%'
    or description like '%lazy%'
    or description like '%dog%'
    group by description

    union all

    select title as matched_val, count(*) as relevance
    from table 
    where title like '%hotel%'
    or title like '%london%'
    or title like '%lazy%'
    or title like '%dog%'
    group by title

    union all

    select tags as matched_val, count(*) as relevance
    from table 
    where tags like '%hotel%'
    or tags like '%london%'
    or tags like '%lazy%'
    or tags like '%dog%'
    group by tags
) as a
order by a.relevance desc
LIMIT 0 , 3

it at least means you only have to do your like matching once, rather than in the predicate and in the switch statement, plus the optimiser would be able to use an index on description, title and tags (which you will need to add yourself) and you should be away.

have a go and see how your query optimiser likes it...

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I get the following error 'Every derived table must have its own alias' :S Looks good otherwise –  Mark Jan 14 '10 at 13:07
    
See my latest edit for a more formatted version... You may need to do something like this: select matched_val, relevance from ( --all those unions ) as a order by a.relevance desc limit 0, 3 I've not used mysql, but you would have to do that on sql server –  James B Jan 14 '10 at 13:32
    
Wow... No errors, but its far more expensive 0.0554 sec on 20 rows compared to 0.0006 and the results are wrong. I think I can't be more efficient because each subquery is a query and as such its 4 queries instead on one big one. Thank you anyway. –  Mark Jan 14 '10 at 14:04
    
Interesting, oh well, we tried!...I definitely suggest comparing the query plans for the two queries though to see how it's doing it...But yes, just one query does look like it would be more efficient, with one scan through the table/index, as opposed to three separate ones. –  James B Jan 14 '10 at 14:10
    
Thanks again. I think my solution is your first suggestion, have the user choose a single category from a combobox at search so that I use the original query, but only use it once per search. –  Mark Jan 14 '10 at 14:26

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