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I received some Python code to maintain. How can this possibly work and why it crashes with unindent error only if I modify the internals of the inner for loop?

        for m in range(len(Model)):
        if param==1:
            m=m-1

            parFlag = 0
            for s in range(len(PSets)):
                if Parameter.lower() in self._Sets._P_ModelVars[Model[m]][PSets[s]]:
                    parFlag = 1

It looks even stranger now when I am entering it here:

enter image description here

I think it can have something to do with tabs, but I don't know much about them except I try to avoid them wherever possible.

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Did you mix leading spaces and tabs? –  Matthias Dec 17 '13 at 13:48
    
Can you explain what the code is supposed to do? –  Mr E Dec 17 '13 at 13:49
    
I don't know and I am trying to understand it. It seems like the parts with strange indentation were written by a different developer with also poorer style in choosing variable names and other stuff. –  Vladimir F Dec 17 '13 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Indeed, the code is mixing tabs and spaces:

>>> from pprint import pprint
>>> pprint('''\
...                     for m in range(len(Model)):
...                 if param==1:
...                     m=m-1
... 
...                 parFlag = 0
...                 for s in range(len(PSets)):
...                     if Parameter.lower() in self._Sets._P_ModelVars[Model[m]][PSets[s]]:
...                         parFlag = 1
... '''.splitlines())
['    \t\tfor m in range(len(Model)):',
 '\t\t    if param==1:',
 '\t\t    \tm=m-1',
 '',
 '        \t    parFlag = 0',
 '        \t    for s in range(len(PSets)):',
 '\t                if Parameter.lower() in self._Sets._P_ModelVars[Model[m]][PSets[s]]:',
 '\t                    parFlag = 1']

Note all the mix of \t and characters at the start of each line.

A good text editor will let you replace the tabs with spaces, and also let you set what style should be used when creating new indentations. The Python style guide recommends you stick with only spaces.

You can detect where spaces and tabs are mixed by running the code with the -tt command line switch:

python -tt yourscript.py
share|improve this answer
    
The command indeed finds such places, thanks! –  Vladimir F Dec 17 '13 at 13:51
    
Finally I used regex search and replace in kate. I only had to find out that it \t stands for 8 characters. –  Vladimir F Dec 17 '13 at 14:08

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