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I wonder how to obtain feedback from an event?

Situation:

Let's say that a object (Slave) can produce events(request changing a property). An other object (Master) subscribes to these events, analyzes the changing property value and accepts, or denies this change. Then the feedback is returned to the Slave, and it change or not its property.

Example:

    public class DateChangingEventArgs : EventArgs {
        public DateTime oldDateTime, newDateTime;
        DateChangingEventArgs(DateTime oldDateTime, 
            DateTime newDateTime) {
            this.oldDateTime = oldDateTime;
            this.newDateTime = newDateTime;
        }
    }

    public class MyDateTextBox : TextBox {
        public event EventHandler<DateChangingEventArgs> DateChanging;
        public DateTime MyDate;
        private DateTime myTempDate;

        protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e) {
            base.OnKeyDown(e);

            if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter && 
                DateTime.TryParseExact(this.Text, "dd/mm/yyyy", 
                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, DateTimeStyles.None, 
                out myTempDate)) {                    
                if (!DateChanging == null)
                    DateChanging(this, 
                        new DateChangingEventArgs(MyDate, myTempDate));

                if (feedbackOK) //  here ????????
                    MyDate = myTempDate;
            }
        }
    }

[EDIT]

With your suggestions some modifications in the code am I sure that Cancel is already updated?

public class DateChangingEventArgs : CancelEventArgs

...

public class MyDateTextBox : TextBox
{
    public event EventHandler<DateChangingEventArgs> DateChanging;
    ...
    protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e) {
        if (...)
        {          
            DateChangingEventArgs myRequest;
            if (!DateChanging == null) {
                myRequest = new DateChangingEventArgs(MyDate, myTempDate);
                DateChanging(this,  myRequest);
            }

            // Sure that this value is already updated ??
            if (!myRequest.Cancel) 
                MyDate = myTempDate;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
I'm not sure I know what you mean by "am I sure that Cancel is already updated". All DateChanging event handlers fire before your function moves onto the next line (i.e. onto if(!myRequest.Cancel)). You'd have to go out of your way to gets the handlers to run asynchronously. –  Binary Worrier Jan 14 '10 at 11:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You declare your own class and pass an instance of it instead of "EventArgs.Empty".

The event hander changes properties on the event object (providing feedback).

You then check the event args object and check the feedback provided.

Any questions?

e.g.

class FeedbackEventArgs: EventArgs
{
   public bool IsOk {get; set;}
}
...
FeedbackEventArgs feedback = new FeedbackEventArgs();
feedback.IsOK = false;
if (!DateChanging == null) 
    DateChanging(this, feedback); 
if (feedback.IsOK) 
share|improve this answer
    
Code provided as sample only, and has not been compiled. –  Binary Worrier Jan 14 '10 at 11:21
    
Also popular coding standards say "EventFeedback" should be named "FeedbackEventArgs". –  Binary Worrier Jan 14 '10 at 11:50
    
@Binary: the Class EventFeedback here is not(does not inherit) a EventArgs, so, any guidelines are applicable here. –  serhio Jan 14 '10 at 11:51
    
@serhio: Changed names to refelect guidelines, and inherited from EventArgs. Thanks :) –  Binary Worrier Jan 14 '10 at 14:32

Use a custom EventArgs type that contains the feedback.

CancelEventArgs is an example of such an implementation, where the subscriber can set the Cancel property.

share|improve this answer

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