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I'm iterating through a number of text files, trying to locate all carriage-returns, and individually save the text between carriage-returns. I get the index numbers of all carriage-returns, but I haven't got the slightest about saving the text.

Basically I want to save every string between two carriage-returns into an individual variable. The next step is to save all the words within a string as an individual hash.

Here is my code so far (edited based on the help by Tin Man and Screenmutt) to get every single paragraph of a file into an array:

# script start

# outputfile
output_text = File.open("output.txt", 'w')

# directory with files
Dir.chdir("nkamp")

#count lines
lines = File.readlines("first.txt")
line_count = lines.size
text = lines.join
paragraph_count = text.split("\.\r").length
puts "#{paragraph_count} paragraphs."

#array of paragraphs
paragraphs = Array.new
contents = []
File.foreach("first.txt", "\.\r") do |paragraph|
  puts paragraph.chomp
  puts '-' * 40
  contents << paragraph.chomp
  paragraphs << paragraph.chomp
end

puts paragraphs[10]

This code gives me an array with all the paragraphs. I am using "\.\r" instead of "\n\n" because the texts are copied from PDF files, and have lost the normal page layout structures.

The next step is to save an array of the words in a paragraph into the array instead of simply a string of text:

words_in_each_paragraph = Array.new

File.foreach("Ann Reg Sci (2).txt", "\.\r") do |paragraph|
    word_hash = {}
    paragraph.split(/\W+/).each_with_object(word_hash) { |w, h|
        h[w] = []
    }
    words_in_each_paragraph << word_hash
end

puts words_in_each_paragraph[8]

Which gives the following output:

{""=>[], "The"=>[], "above"=>[], "contributions"=>[], "highlight"=>[], "the"=>[], "importance"=>[], "of"=>[], "sophisticated"=>[], "modeling"=>[], "work"=>[], "for"=>[], "a"=>[], "better"=>[], "understanding"=>[], "complexity"=>[], "entrepreneurial"=>[], "space"=>[], "economy"=>[]}

Now the next step is loop through every file, and create a dynamic hash that gives me

a. a number for the article. b. a number for the paragraph. c. the list of words as seen above.

For this I need to learn how to dynamically create hashes. This is where it goes wrong:

lines = File.readlines("test.txt")
line_count = lines.size
text = lines.join
paragraph_count = text.split("\.\r").length
puts "#{paragraph_count} paragraphs."

testArray = Array.new(paragraph_count.to_i, Hash.new)
for i in 0...paragraph_count.to_i do
    testArray[i] = Hash.new 
    puts "testArray #{i} has been made"
end
words_in_each_paragraph = Array.new

File.foreach("test.txt", "\.\r") do |paragraph|
    word_hash = {}
    paragraph.split(/\W+/).each_with_object(word_hash) { |w, h|
        h[w] = []
    }
    words_in_each_paragraph << word_hash
    testArray[i][:value] = word_hash
    puts testArray[i] # IT WORKS HERE #
end

puts testArray[1] # AND IT DOESN'T WORK HERE #

This code works inside the loop, but not outside of it. Outside of the loop testArray returns empty except for the last number, in this case testArray[11].

share|improve this question
1  
Please give example input/output and properly format the ruby code. Thanks! –  screenmutt Dec 17 '13 at 15:24
1  
I'd strongly recommend taking your last code example to codereview.stackexchange.com, and ask how to refactor it. It'll be eye-opening. –  the Tin Man Dec 18 '13 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ruby has some capabilities that make this easy.

I have a sample text file that looks like:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod

tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam,

quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo
consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse

cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non
proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Running this:

File.foreach('data.txt', "\n\n") do |paragraph|
  puts paragraph.chomp
  puts '-' * 40
end

Results in:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod
----------------------------------------
tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam,
----------------------------------------
quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo
consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse
----------------------------------------
cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non
proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
----------------------------------------

So, Ruby is looking through the file as it reads it, returning chunks of text as paragraphs for me.

The really important thing about using foreach, is it returns text from the input file in chunks. Normally it'd do it line-by-line, but, as I do above, it can return in chunks of lines, AKA paragraphs, which is very memory efficient and very fast. Sometimes we need to retrieve an entire file at once using "slurping". read and readlines both provide that, however "slurping" the file is not scalable; In development and test phases you might be reading a small sample file, but in production you might be presented with multi-gigabyte files, which can crush a machine when you try to pull the entire file into memory. You have to be very aware of the host's resources before you go down that path. People often use read and readlines on the mistaken assumption it'll be faster to pull everything into memory, not understanding that modern OSes and hardware have the file in memory in multiple buffers well before the app ever sees it, so line-by-line IO, like provided by foreach, is indiscernible in its processing speed. So, be very careful slurping your data.

If I want to split a line into its component words I have to remember to remove any intervening carriage-returns and punctuation, then I'm free to mangle the line into words. An easy way to do that is to tell Ruby to split the paragraph on NON-words:

word_hash = {}
File.foreach('data.txt', "\n\n") do |paragraph|
  paragraph.split(/\W+/).each_with_object(word_hash) { |w, h|
    h[w] = []
  }
end

puts word_hash

Which, when run, results in:

{"Lorem"=>[], "ipsum"=>[], "dolor"=>[], "sit"=>[], "amet"=>[], "consectetur"=>[], "adipisicing"=>[], "elit"=>[], "sed"=>[], "do"=>[], "eiusmod"=>[], "tempor"=>[], "incididunt"=>[], "ut"=>[], "labore"=>[], "et"=>[], "dolore"=>[], "magna"=>[], "aliqua"=>[], "Ut"=>[], "enim"=>[], "ad"=>[], "minim"=>[], "veniam"=>[], "quis"=>[], "nostrud"=>[], "exercitation"=>[], "ullamco"=>[], "laboris"=>[], "nisi"=>[], "aliquip"=>[], "ex"=>[], "ea"=>[], "commodo"=>[], "consequat"=>[], "Duis"=>[], "aute"=>[], "irure"=>[], "in"=>[], "reprehenderit"=>[], "voluptate"=>[], "velit"=>[], "esse"=>[], "cillum"=>[], "eu"=>[], "fugiat"=>[], "nulla"=>[], "pariatur"=>[], "Excepteur"=>[], "sint"=>[], "occaecat"=>[], "cupidatat"=>[], "non"=>[], "proident"=>[], "sunt"=>[], "culpa"=>[], "qui"=>[], "officia"=>[], "deserunt"=>[], "mollit"=>[], "anim"=>[], "id"=>[], "est"=>[], "laborum"=>[]}

But, wait, there's more! Usually, when we want to get lists of the component words, we want to count their occurrences, or do something like that. There's another Ruby trick we can use using group_by:

words = File.foreach('data.txt', "\n\n").flat_map{ |paragraph|
  paragraph.split(/\W+/)
}

puts words.group_by{ |w| w }

Results in:

{"Lorem"=>["Lorem"], "ipsum"=>["ipsum"], "dolor"=>["dolor", "dolor"], "sit"=>["sit"], "amet"=>["amet"], "consectetur"=>["consectetur"], "adipisicing"=>["adipisicing"], "elit"=>["elit"], "sed"=>["sed"], "do"=>["do"], "eiusmod"=>["eiusmod"], "tempor"=>["tempor"], "incididunt"=>["incididunt"], "ut"=>["ut", "ut"], "labore"=>["labore"], "et"=>["et"], "dolore"=>["dolore", "dolore"], "magna"=>["magna"], "aliqua"=>["aliqua"], "Ut"=>["Ut"], "enim"=>["enim"], "ad"=>["ad"], "minim"=>["minim"], "veniam"=>["veniam"], "quis"=>["quis"], "nostrud"=>["nostrud"], "exercitation"=>["exercitation"], "ullamco"=>["ullamco"], "laboris"=>["laboris"], "nisi"=>["nisi"], "aliquip"=>["aliquip"], "ex"=>["ex"], "ea"=>["ea"], "commodo"=>["commodo"], "consequat"=>["consequat"], "Duis"=>["Duis"], "aute"=>["aute"], "irure"=>["irure"], "in"=>["in", "in", "in"], "reprehenderit"=>["reprehenderit"], "voluptate"=>["voluptate"], "velit"=>["velit"], "esse"=>["esse"], "cillum"=>["cillum"], "eu"=>["eu"], "fugiat"=>["fugiat"], "nulla"=>["nulla"], "pariatur"=>["pariatur"], "Excepteur"=>["Excepteur"], "sint"=>["sint"], "occaecat"=>["occaecat"], "cupidatat"=>["cupidatat"], "non"=>["non"], "proident"=>["proident"], "sunt"=>["sunt"], "culpa"=>["culpa"], "qui"=>["qui"], "officia"=>["officia"], "deserunt"=>["deserunt"], "mollit"=>["mollit"], "anim"=>["anim"], "id"=>["id"], "est"=>["est"], "laborum"=>["laborum"]}

That's a long list, but for every unique word found in the text, there's now an array of the occurrences of that word. A simple manipulation of the arrays results in the counts of the words sorted in descending order:

words = File.foreach('data.txt', "\n\n").flat_map{ |paragraph|
  paragraph.split(/\W+/)
}

puts Hash[words.group_by{ |w| w }.map{ |k, v| [k, v.size] }.sort_by{ |k,v| v }.reverse]

Looking like:

{"in"=>3, "ut"=>2, "dolore"=>2, "dolor"=>2, "Excepteur"=>1, "deserunt"=>1, "officia"=>1, "qui"=>1, "culpa"=>1, "sunt"=>1, "proident"=>1, "non"=>1, "cupidatat"=>1, "occaecat"=>1, "sint"=>1, "mollit"=>1, "pariatur"=>1, "nulla"=>1, "fugiat"=>1, "eu"=>1, "cillum"=>1, "esse"=>1, "velit"=>1, "voluptate"=>1, "reprehenderit"=>1, "anim"=>1, "irure"=>1, "aute"=>1, "Duis"=>1, "consequat"=>1, "commodo"=>1, "ea"=>1, "ex"=>1, "aliquip"=>1, "nisi"=>1, "laboris"=>1, "ullamco"=>1, "exercitation"=>1, "nostrud"=>1, "quis"=>1, "veniam"=>1, "minim"=>1, "ad"=>1, "enim"=>1, "Ut"=>1, "aliqua"=>1, "magna"=>1, "id"=>1, "et"=>1, "labore"=>1, "est"=>1, "incididunt"=>1, "tempor"=>1, "eiusmod"=>1, "do"=>1, "sed"=>1, "elit"=>1, "adipisicing"=>1, "consectetur"=>1, "amet"=>1, "sit"=>1, "laborum"=>1, "ipsum"=>1, "Lorem"=>1}

I deliberately skipped over how to do this for each, individual, paragraph, but you can figure that out by dissecting these parts and put that together. Make other minor tweaks and you should have any sort of analysis of the paragraphs' contents you need.


In the updated code:

"\."

inside

"\.\r"

isn't necessary. Strings don't need an escaped '.', because it has no special meaning. Instead use:

".\r"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tin Man.. This has brought me much further! –  Seeb Dec 18 '13 at 12:30
    
I'm glad it helped. You're new 'round here; If you find an answer helps, be sure to add an up-vote to it. And if it's the answer that gave you the most help and/or supplied the working answer, let the answerer know by selecting that as THE answer to your question. It helps others know that it solved, or at least helped solve, the problem. –  the Tin Man Dec 18 '13 at 16:40
    
Thought I already did that. My mistake. –  Seeb Dec 18 '13 at 16:43

You don't have to scan to get the contents line by line, you can just use the each_line functionality.

INPUT

This is a test
of putting different lines
into different variables.

CODE

text = File.open("input.txt", 'r')

contents = []
counter = Hash.new(0)

text.read.split(/\\r\\r/) do |paragraph|
  contents << line

  line.split(/\s/).each do |word|
    counter[word] += 1
  end
end

puts contents.inspect
# => ["This is a test\n", "of putting different lines\n", "into different variables.\n"]

puts counter.inspect
# => {"This"=>1, "is"=>1, "a"=>1, "test"=>1, "of"=>1, "putting"=>1, "different"=>2, "lines"=>1, "into"=>1, "variables."=>1}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the input screenmutt. However, i want to be able to analyze each paragraph (in stead of each seperate line) –  Seeb Dec 17 '13 at 16:27
    
that should do it. –  screenmutt Dec 17 '13 at 16:33

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