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Which one is more optimal or is there any difference at all?

String s = methodThatReturnsString();
int i = methodThatReturnsInt();
thirdMethod(s, i);

or

thirdMethod(methodThatReturnsString(), methodThatReturnsInt());

By optimal I mean optimal in the terms of memory usage etc.

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18  
If there is a difference, it isn't worth bothering about. –  Yacoby Jan 14 '10 at 11:54
3  
And said difference would depend on the compiler used. Compiler optimization may even result in the exact same code if neither s nor i are used after that. I would make my decision based on readability instead. –  Stroboskop Jan 14 '10 at 11:55
1  
you could try compiling both and comparing the byte code –  flamingpenguin Jan 14 '10 at 12:05
2  
First, "optimal" is not a property that can be "more" or "less". Either something is optimal or it isn't. Instead of "more optimal" you seem to mean "better" or "more efficient". Second, don't misspell names in programs; it is "method", always. –  Svante Jan 14 '10 at 12:26
1  
It is hard to imagine a more trifling performance question than this. As a Java programmer, I cannot stress emphatically enough how much it is NOT YOUR JOB to distinguish between these obviously-equivalent constructs. –  Kevin Bourrillion Jan 15 '10 at 0:21

9 Answers 9

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It has nothing to do with optimization here, but it's more a question of readability of your code...

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2  
Absolutely, but keep in mind people may disagree on whether the first or second is more readable. –  Prof. Falken Jan 14 '10 at 12:11
    
Yes, you are right. However, it is still a question of readability here ;) –  romaintaz Jan 14 '10 at 12:32

Which one is more optimal?

The one which is easier to read :-)

I would think that any difference is optimized away when compiled (provided that the declared variables are not used afterwards - i.e. the solutions are otherwise identical).

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I highly suspect that both forms are identical, but don't take my word for it. Let's find out ourselves! :D

public class Tests {

    public void test1() {
        String s = methodThatReturnsString();
        int i = methodThatReturnsInt();
        thirdMethod(s, i);
    }

    public void test2() {
        thirdMethod(methodThatReturnsString(), methodThatReturnsInt());
    }

    public String methodThatReturnsString() {
        return "";
    }

    public int methodThatReturnsInt() {
        return 0;
    }

    public void thirdMethod(String s, int i) {

    }

}

Let's compile it:

> javac -version
javac 1.6.0_17

> javac Tests.java

Now, let's print out the bytecode instructions!

> javap -c Tests
Compiled from "Tests.java"
public class Tests extends java.lang.Object{
public Tests();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."":()V
   4:   return

public void test1();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokevirtual   #2; //Method methodThatReturnsString:()Ljava/lang/String;
   4:   astore_1
   5:   aload_0
   6:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method methodThatReturnsInt:()I
   9:   istore_2
   10:  aload_0
   11:  aload_1
   12:  iload_2
   13:  invokevirtual   #4; //Method thirdMethod:(Ljava/lang/String;I)V
   16:  return

public void test2();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   aload_0
   2:   invokevirtual   #2; //Method methodThatReturnsString:()Ljava/lang/String;
   5:   aload_0
   6:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method methodThatReturnsInt:()I
   9:   invokevirtual   #4; //Method thirdMethod:(Ljava/lang/String;I)V
   12:  return

public java.lang.String methodThatReturnsString();
  Code:
   0:   ldc     #5; //String
   2:   areturn

public int methodThatReturnsInt();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   ireturn

public void thirdMethod(java.lang.String, int);
  Code:
   0:   return

}

I thought this looked a bit strange - test1() and test2() are different. It looks like the compiler is adding the debugging symbols. Perhaps this is forcing it to explicitly assign return values to the local variables, introducing extra instructions.

Let's try recompiling it with no debugging:

> javac -g:none Tests.java
> javap -c Tests
public class Tests extends java.lang.Object{
public Tests();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."":()V
   4:   return

public void test1();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokevirtual   #2; //Method methodThatReturnsString:()Ljava/lang/String;
   4:   astore_1
   5:   aload_0
   6:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method methodThatReturnsInt:()I
   9:   istore_2
   10:  aload_0
   11:  aload_1
   12:  iload_2
   13:  invokevirtual   #4; //Method thirdMethod:(Ljava/lang/String;I)V
   16:  return

public void test2();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   aload_0
   2:   invokevirtual   #2; //Method methodThatReturnsString:()Ljava/lang/String;
   5:   aload_0
   6:   invokevirtual   #3; //Method methodThatReturnsInt:()I
   9:   invokevirtual   #4; //Method thirdMethod:(Ljava/lang/String;I)V
   12:  return

public java.lang.String methodThatReturnsString();
  Code:
   0:   ldc     #5; //String
   2:   areturn

public int methodThatReturnsInt();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   ireturn

public void thirdMethod(java.lang.String, int);
  Code:
   0:   return

}

Inconceivable!

So, according to my compiler (Sun JDK), the bytecode is shorter for the second version. However, the virtual machine will probably optimize any differences away. :)

Edit: Some extra clarification courtesy of Joachim Sauer's comment:

It's important to note that the byte code tells only half the story: How it is actually executed depends a lot on the JVM (that's quite different to C/C++, where you can see the assembler code and it's exactly how it's executed). I think you realize that, but I think it should be made clearer in the post.

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2  
It's important to note that the byte code tells only half the story: How it is actually executed depends a lot on the JVM (that's quite different to C/C++, where you can see the assembler code and it's exactly how it's executed). I think you realize that, but I think it should be made clearer in the post. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 14 '10 at 12:37
    
@Joachim: I wholeheartedly agree! I have added your comment to the answer. –  Adam Paynter Jan 14 '10 at 12:47
2  
++ For taking the time to walk through it. The only thing I don't hear is anyone saying that the relevance of the difference depends on how much work goes on inside the functions. For typical functions, the difference you found could easily be in the noise. –  Mike Dunlavey Jan 14 '10 at 14:32

I would prefer the first option. However this has nothing to do with speed, but with debuggability. In the second option I can not easily check what the values of s and i are. Performance-wise this will not make any difference at all.

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There shouldn't be any difference. Both the temporarily used String and int have to reside somewhere and Java is, internally, a stack machine. So regardless of whether you give the return values of that method calls names or not, they have to be stored on the stack prior to execution of thirdMethod(String, int).

Implications of that for the resulting JITted code can be hard to find. That's on a completely different level ob abstraction.

If in doubt, profile. But I wouldn't expect any difference here.

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It is the same thing. In both cases the same functions will be called and variables (automatic or explicitly defined will be allocated). The only difference is that in the second case, the variables will be ready to garbage collected whereas on the first one you need to wait to get out of scope.

Of course however the first one is much more readable.

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-1 Assertion about GC is not true. In practice, nothing really gets collected until the method exits anyway. (Using a newish openJDK) –  Kevin Bourrillion Jan 15 '10 at 0:23
    
Yes, but in the first version the variables s and i won't be garbage collectable even after the method has exited. What will happen depends on the wrapping code. –  kgiannakakis Jan 15 '10 at 5:47

There is no difference at all. In this case, you might want to consider readability and clearness.

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Experiment and measure. If speed is what matters, measure speed. If memory usage matters, measure memory usage. If number of bytecode instructions is what matters, count bytecode instructions. If code readability is what matters, measure code readability. Figuring out how to measure code readability is your homework.

If you don't experiment and measure all you get will be opinion and argument.

Or, if you are very lucky, someone on SO will run your experiments for you.

PS This post is, of course, my opinion and argument

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thirdMethod(metodThatReturnsString(), metodThatReturnsInt());

is more optimal...

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1  
And why is this so? –  eljenso Jan 14 '10 at 12:08
    
you can use two variables s and i for future use in the same program –  GuruKulki Jan 14 '10 at 12:15
1  
yup, that might come in handy in case you are out of variable names... –  Fortega Jan 14 '10 at 12:27

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