Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a rotation program for Tetris that I am coding in python. The rotation part works correctly but I have the problem of blocks rotating off the screen or into other blocks. What I have tried to create is a function that will make a test rotation to see if the rotation is valid before actually rotating the block.

The functions are called here:

 if rotatecheck(curblock,rowheight,columnwidth):
        rotate(curblock,rowheight,columnwidth)

where curblock is a list with 4 rect objects and 1 color, columnwidth and rowheight are integers defining the size of the playspace and rotatecheck() is defined as

def rotatecheck(curc, ro, col):
    new=[]
    ct=len(blockonscreen)-1
    if ct==0:
        ct=1
    for z in range(len(curc)):
        new.append(curc[z])
    rotate(new, ro, col)
    for i in range(len(new)-1):
        if new[i].left<0 or new[i].left>=WINDOWWIDTH:
            return False
        for b in blockonscreen:
            if b !=curc:
                for x in range(len(block)-1):
                    if new[i] == block[x]:
                        return False
    return True

blockonscreen is a list of lists containing 4 rect objects and a color, and rotate() is defined as

def rotate(curr,ro,col):
     if curr[4]==yellow:
         rotateo(curr,ro,col)
     elif curr[4]==cyan:
         rotatei(curr,ro,col)
     else:
         rotatea(curr,ro,col)

def rotatei(curr,ro,col):
    if curr[2].centerx>curr[0].centerx and curr[3].centerx>curr[0].centerx:
        horiz=True
        curr[0].centerx+=col
        bla=1
    elif curr[2].centerx<curr[0].centerx and curr[3].centerx<curr[0].centerx:
        horiz=True
        curr[0].centerx-=col
        bla=-1
    elif curr[2].centery>curr[0].centery and curr[3].centery>curr[0].centery:
        horiz=False
        curr[0].centery+=ro
        bla=-1
    elif curr[2].centery<curr[0].centery and curr[3].centery<curr[0].centery:
        horiz=False
        curr[0].centery-=ro
        bla=1
    for f in range (1,4):
        if horiz:
            curr[f].left=curr[0].left
            curr[f].top=curr[0].top+(blocks[0][f-1][0]*ro*bla)
        else:
            curr[f].top=curr[0].top
            curr[f].right=curr[0].right+(blocks[0][f-1][0]*col*bla)
def rotateo(curr,ro,col):
    pass
def rotatea(curr,ro,col):
    middlex=curr[0].centerx
    middley=curr[0].centery
    for r in range(1,4):
        if curr[r].centery==middley and curr[r].centerx>middlex:
            curr[r].centery+=ro
            curr[r].centerx-=col
        elif curr[r].centery==middley and curr[r].centerx<middlex:
            curr[r].centery-=ro
            curr[r].centerx+=col
        elif curr[r].centerx==middlex and curr[r].centery>middley:
            curr[r].centery-=ro
            curr[r].centerx-=col            
        elif curr[r].centerx==middlex and curr[r].centery<middley:
            curr[r].centery+=ro
            curr[r].centerx+=col            
        elif curr[r].centerx>middlex and curr[r].centery>middley:
            curr[r].centerx-=(2*col)
        elif curr[r].centery>middley and curr[r].centerx<middlex:
            curr[r].centery-=(2*ro)
        elif curr[r].centerx<middlex and curr[r].centery<middley:
            curr[r].centerx+=(2*col)
        elif curr[r].centerx>middlex and curr[r].centery<middley:
            curr[r].centery+=(2*ro)

In its current state the program acts as if rotatecheck() doesn't exist. I have scoured my code repeatedly but I can't find anything wrong with it.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not. That would be smarter but rotatecheck() is called before rotate –  Dan G. Dec 17 '13 at 17:18
1  
If you called rotatecheck inside rotate it would keep going round, as rotatecheck calls rotate! –  jonrsharpe Dec 17 '13 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like your problem here is that rotatecheck actually rotates the objects you are trying to test, causing them to be rotated even if it does return False.

for z in range(len(curc)):
    new.append(curc[z])

centerx and centery are held in the objects in curc, when you do this you fill a new list with references to the same objects, which are then rotated. You will need to create copies of the individual objects within curc; define a copy method which creates a new object with the same values of e.g. centerx.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I thought it was something like when you set a list equal to another list and they become connected but i didn't make the connection. –  Dan G. Dec 17 '13 at 17:32
    
Wait! if this is true then why doesn't it rotate twice when rotatecheck() returns true? –  Dan G. Dec 17 '13 at 17:40
1  
That is a good question. Have you tried throwing in a few print statements to find out what runs and in what order? –  jonrsharpe Dec 17 '13 at 17:50
    
Ill do that as soon as I get a chance –  Dan G. Dec 17 '13 at 18:00
    
It was not rotating twice because rotatecheck was always returning False I fixed that, and now I'm going to work on your solution. I've updated to post with the new code. –  Dan G. Dec 18 '13 at 15:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.