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I have been programming with OOP languages for over 10 years but I'm learning JavaScript now and it's the first time I've encountered prototype-based inheritance. I tend to learn fastest by studying good code. What's a well-written example of a JavaScript application (or library) that properly uses prototypal inheritance? And can you describe (briefly) how/where prototypal inheritance is used, so I know where to start reading?

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Did you get a chance to check out that Base library? It really is nice, and quite small. If you like it, consider marking my answer as the answer. TIA, roland. –  Roland Bouman Jan 16 '10 at 10:38
    
I guess I'm in same boat as you. I want, as well, to learn a little about this prototypal language, not being restricted only to oop frameworks or similar, even them being great and all, we need to learn, right? Not just some framework do that for me, even if i am going to use it. But learn how to create new things in new languages with new ways, think outside of the box. I like your style. I am going try to help me and perhaps help you. As soon as i find something, i'll let you know. –  NoProblemBabe Jan 22 '10 at 18:38
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7 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted
+100

Douglas Crockford has a nice page on JavaScript Prototypal Inheritance:

Five years ago I wrote Classical Inheritance in JavaScript. It showed that JavaScript is a class-free, prototypal language, and that it has sufficient expressive power to simulate a classical system. My programming style has evolved since then, as any good programmer's should. I have learned to fully embrace prototypalism, and have liberated myself from the confines of the classical model.

Dean Edward's Base.js, Mootools's Class or John Resig's Simple Inheritance works are ways to do classical inheritance in JavaScript.

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As mentioned, the movies by Douglas Crockford give a good explanation about the why and it convers the how. But to put it in a couple of lines of JavaScript:

// Declaring our Animal object
var Animal = function () {

    this.name = 'unknown';

    this.getName = function () {
        return this.name;
    }

    return this;
};

// Declaring our Dog object
var Dog = function () {

    // A private variable here        
    var private = 42;

    // overriding the name
    this.name = "Bello";

    // Implementing ".bark()"
    this.bark = function () {
        return 'MEOW';
    }  

    return this;
};


// Dog extends animal
Dog.prototype = new Animal();

// -- Done declaring --

// Creating an instance of Dog.
var dog = new Dog();

// Proving our case
console.log(
    "Is dog an instance of Dog? ", dog instanceof Dog, "\n",
    "Is dog an instance of Animal? ", dog instanceof Animal, "\n",
    dog.bark() +"\n", // Should be: "MEOW"
    dog.getName() +"\n", // Should be: "Bello"
    dog.private +"\n" // Should be: 'undefined'
);

The problem with this approach however, is that it will re-create the object every time you create on. So this is not the best way to go about it. The best way is by declaring your objects on the prototype stack, like so:

// Defining test one, prototypal
var testOne = function () {};
testOne.prototype = (function () {
    var me = {}, privateVariable = 42;
    me.someMethod = function () {
        return privateVariable;
    };

    me.publicVariable = "foo bar";
    me.anotherMethod = function () {
        return this.publicVariable;
    };

    return me;

})();


// Defining test two, function
var testTwo = ​function() {
    var me = {}, privateVariable = 42;
    me.someMethod = function () {
        return privateVariable;
    };

    me.publicVariable = "foo bar";
    me.anotherMethod = function () {
        return this.publicVariable;
    };

    return me;
};


// Proving that both techniques are functionally identical
var resultTestOne = new testOne(),
    resultTestTwo = new testTwo();

console.log(
    resultTestOne.someMethod(), // Should print 42
    resultTestOne.publicVariable // Should print "foo bar"
);

console.log(
    resultTestTwo.someMethod(), // Should print 42
    resultTestTwo.publicVariable // Should print "foo bar"
);



// Performance benchmark start
var stop, start, loopCount = 1000000;

// Running testOne
start = (new Date()).getTime(); 
for (var i = loopCount; i>0; i--) {
    new testOne();
}
stop = (new Date()).getTime();

console.log('Test one took: '+ Math.round(((stop/1000) - (start/1000))*1000) +' milliseconds');



// Running testTwo
start = (new Date()).getTime(); 
for (var i = loopCount; i>0; i--) {
    new testTwo();
}
stop = (new Date()).getTime();

console.log('Test two took: '+ Math.round(((stop/1000) - (start/1000))*1000) +' milliseconds');

There is a slight downside when it comes to introspection. Dumping testOne, will result in less useful information.

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2  
Do note that in testOne privateVariable is simply a variable in the scope of the IIFE, and its shared across all instances, so you shouldn't store instance-specific data on it. (on testTwo it is instance-specific, as each call to testTwo() creates a new, per-instance, scope) –  shesek Dec 31 '12 at 8:12
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I would take a look at YUI, and at Dean Edward's Base library: http://dean.edwards.name/weblog/2006/03/base/

For YUI you can take a quick look at the lang module, esp. the YAHOO.lang.extend method. And then, you can browse the source of some widgets or utilities and see how they use that method.

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2  
+1 for Dean's Base.js –  Pete Duncanson Jan 14 '10 at 14:39
    
YUI 2 has been deprecated as of 2011, so the link to lang is semi-broken. Anyone care to fix it for YUI 3? –  ack Dec 15 '13 at 16:05
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There's also Microsoft's ASP.NET Ajax library, http://www.asp.net/ajax/.

There are a lot of good MSDN articles around as well, including Create Advanced Web Applications With Object-Oriented Techniques.

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That is a nice article, thanks! –  Roland Bouman Jan 14 '10 at 21:00
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I suggest looking at PrototypeJS' Class.create:
Line 83 @ http://prototypejs.org/assets/2009/8/31/prototype.js

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function Shape(x, y) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
}

// 1. Explicitly call base (Shape) constructor from subclass (Circle) constructor passing this as the explicit receiver
function Circle(x, y, r) {
    Shape.call(this, x, y);
    this.r = r;
}

// 2. Use Object.create to construct the subclass prototype object to avoid calling the base constructor
Circle.prototype = Object.create(Shape.prototype);
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The best examples I've seen are in Douglas Crockford's JavaScript: The Good Parts. It's definitely worth buying to help you get a balanced view on the language.

Douglas Crockford is responsible for the JSON format and works at Yahoo as a JavaScript guru.

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2  
responsible? that sounds almost like "guilty of" :) –  Roland Bouman Jan 22 '10 at 23:22
    
@Roland I think JSON is quite a nice non-verbose format for storing data. He definitely didn't invent it though, the format was there for the config settings in Steam back in 2002 –  Chris S Jan 23 '10 at 11:25
    
Chris S, I think so too - More and more often I wish we could've all skipped XML as exchange format and moved on the JSON right away. –  Roland Bouman Jan 23 '10 at 12:53
2  
Not much to invent: JSON is a subset of JavaScript's own object literal syntax, which has been in the language since around 1997. –  Tim Down Jan 25 '10 at 17:48
    
@Time good point - I didn't realise it's been there since the start –  Chris S Jan 25 '10 at 20:28
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