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I'm trying to learn async programming and was struggling with lesson 4 of nodeschool.io with the implementation of an async io with callbacks.

Basically, I'm trying to use fs.readFile to count the number of newlines within a file using a callback.

Here's my code:

var fs = require('fs');
var pathToFile = process.argv[2];

function counter(callback) {
    var buffer = fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    var bufferString = buffer.toString();
    var bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n');
  });
  callback();
}

function logMyNumber() {
  console.log(bufferStringSplit.length-1);
}

counter(logMyNumber);

I understand that callbacks are executed once the line of code is finished executing, so shouldn't the

var bufferString = buffer.toString();
var bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n');

be called after fs.readFile() finishes reading the file from disk?

Then finally the callback() calls logMyNumber, which should just output the number of lines the file has.

share|improve this question
    
Your callback declares a variable data but inside your callback you reference buffer. Then, you reference bufferStringSplit in another function that isn't declared. Also, your callback in counter is called outside the callback from readFile so it's going to get executed before readFile finishes. Follow the chain of callbacks. –  Joe Dec 18 '13 at 0:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have several issues going on and I'll try to outline them all as best as possible

Problem 1: Variable scope

var fs = require('fs');
var pathToFile = process.argv[2];

function counter(callback) {
  var buffer = fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) { 
    // Both of the following variables are scoped to the callback of fs.readFile
    var bufferString = buffer.toString(); 
    var bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 
  });
  callback();
}

function logMyNumber() {
  // Because the variables are in a closure above, bufferStringSplit is null here
  console.log(bufferStringSplit.length-1);
}

counter(logMyNumber);

Solution:

Declare the variables in the module's scope:

var fs = require('fs');
var pathToFile = process.argv[2];

// These can now be accessed from anywhere within the module
var bufferString, bufferStringSplit;

function counter(callback) {
  fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    bufferString = data.toString(); 
    bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 
    callback();
  });
}

// bufferStringSplit should no longer return null here
function logMyNumber() {
  console.log(bufferStringSplit.length-1);
}

Problem 2: Callbacks

function counter(callback) {
  fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    bufferString = buffer.toString(); 
    bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 

    // Place the callback WITHIN the other callback, otherwise they run in parallel
    callback();
  });
}

Problem 3: fs.readFile API

fs.readFile doesn't return anything, so your buffer variable below is null

function counter(callback) {      
  var buffer = fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    bufferString = buffer.toString(); 
    bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 
  });
  callback();
}

Solution:

function counter(callback) {      
  fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    // The data argument of the fs.readFile callback is the data buffer
    bufferString = data.toString(); 
    bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 
  });
  callback();
}

Finally, the code should look like:

var fs = require('fs');
var pathToFile = process.argv[2];

var bufferString, bufferStringSplit;

function counter(callback) {
  fs.readFile(pathToFile, function (err, data) {
    bufferString = data.toString(); 
    bufferStringSplit = bufferString.split('\n'); 
    callback();
  });
}

function logMyNumber() {
  console.log(bufferStringSplit.length-1);
}

counter(logMyNumber);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much jibsales! It works! –  enducat Dec 18 '13 at 0:35
    
If you want to keep bufferString and bufferStringSplit out of the global scope, you could all pass them into the callback from counter: callback( bufferString, bufferStringSplit). –  EmptyArsenal Dec 18 '13 at 1:10
    
@EmptyArsenal This would be something to consider in the browser, however, in node scope is kept local to the module so you don't have to worry about clobbering the global scope. –  jibsales Dec 18 '13 at 1:12
    
@jibsales Good point. Is there a reason why you wouldn't want instantiate the variables in the function and pass it to the callback (besides the fact that there's no need to)? –  EmptyArsenal Dec 18 '13 at 2:09
2  
@EmptyArsenal You are exactly right. If this was a module that was consumed by another, instantiating the variables in the module scope and manipulating them within the various methods of the module could produce some unexpected behaviors. After all, encapsulation is a pillar of good OOP. However, with so many issues in the OP's code, I thought it to be off topic to dive into the specifics of good OOP design. –  jibsales Dec 18 '13 at 2:59

Same problem for me. This is my solution.

var fs = require('fs');
var file = process.argv[2];

function count(pFile, callback) {
  fs.readFile(pFile, "utf8", function(err, data){
     callback(data.split("\n").length-1);
  });
}

count(file, console.log);
share|improve this answer
    
For some context, this is the official answer given in the npm learnyounode package answer. –  Dirk Dec 3 '14 at 16:00

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