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I'd consider myself adept at understanding regular expressions; for the first time, I've been stumped, and the last 20 minutes of googling/searching SO for the answer has yielded nothing.

Consider the string:

var string = "Friends of mine are from France and they love to frolic."

And I want to replace or capture (or do something with) every occurrence of "fr" (case insensitive).

I could use, simply:

var replaced = string.replace(/fr/gi);

However, what if I wanted to ignore the very first occurrence of "fr"? Ordinarily I'd use a positive lookbehind (say, (?<=.)fr in php) to do this but our friend javascript doesn't do that. Without installing a third party library, is there any way to ensure my expression does NOT match at the start of line?

Update: While there are means of replacing with the captured $1, my particular use-case is split() here, and would require fixing up the array after the fact if I used something like @Explosion Pills' suggestion string.replace(/^(fr)|fr/gi, "$1");

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When no lookbehind, match it in a subpattern and add it back in: replace(/(.)fr/gi,'$1andthensomereplace'). –  Wrikken Dec 18 '13 at 1:03
    
@Wrikken my actual use-case here is split() -- I need to split on a complex expression, so how would I add that back in on a split? –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:04
    
@r3mus what array are you looking for? What do you mean by recompiling after the fact? –  Explosion Pills Dec 18 '13 at 1:09
    
@ExplosionPills hard to explain, but if I split out the "fr" with a preceding character, I'd have to capture those erroneously stripped characters back in the split array somehow. –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted
string.split(/(?!^)fr/gi);

This leaves you with ["Friends of mine are ", "om ", "ance and they love to ", "olic."]

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Ah, but this includes the preceding character in the capture; if I were doing something like split() on it, that would cause many complications. Moreover, if there were a word like Alfred in the string, it would replace lfr. –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:00
    
@r3mus You're right - updated. –  Matt Dec 18 '13 at 1:06
    
I dare say, I think you've done it. –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:10

You could just go the path of least resistence and use capturing/alternation:

string.replace(/^(fr)|fr/gi, "$1");
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As I wrote to @Wrikken, my actual use-case here is split() -- I need to split on a complex expression, so how would I add that back in on a split? –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:04
    
@r3mus you may want to update your question since that could substantially change the answer. If you have a capture group with split, the captured pattern is included as a result. Replace the above with .split to see what I mean. –  Explosion Pills Dec 18 '13 at 1:05
    
Yeah, done. Good point. Still, great suggestion for whenever I'm not using split(). –  remus Dec 18 '13 at 1:08
var string = "Friends of mine are from France and they love to frolic."
var replaced;
if(string.substr(0, 2).toLowerCase() == "fr"){
replaced = string.substr(0, 2)+string.substr(2).replace(/fr/gi);
}
else{
replaced = string.replace(/fr/gi);
}
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1  
I might be reading this wrong, but aren't you effectively chopping off the first Fr? That's part of the data; you don't get to just rip it out without putting it back somehow. –  cHao Dec 18 '13 at 1:26
    
Thanks @cHao, I’ve edited the code. –  user2680766 Dec 18 '13 at 1:58

I might try /(?!^)fr/gi. Basically, only match where a beginning-of-string assertion wouldn't pass.

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var string = "Friends of mine are from France and they love to frolic."
var replaced = string.replace(/(.)fr/gi,'$1||').split('||')
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