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Pretty new to C# (and I would describe myself as a beginner in programming, but I'm ambitious), so this is probably something very simple to solve.

I have a function getting called in a switch like this:

            case "PERL_TEST":
            FileInfo fi = new FileInfo("hello.txt");
            mainproc.process_file(fi);
            MessageBox.Show(perl_o);                
            break;

The mainproc.process is a function that calls Perl like this:

myProcess = new Process();
        ProcessStartInfo myProcessStartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo("perl.exe");
        myProcessStartInfo.Arguments = "perly.pl";
        myProcessStartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
        myProcessStartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        myProcessStartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        myProcessStartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        myProcess.StartInfo = myProcessStartInfo;
        myProcess.OutputDataReceived += new DataReceivedEventHandler(Perl_Output);
        myProcess.Start();
        myProcess.BeginOutputReadLine();

The Perl_Output function contains nothing in it, but receives the args: object o, and DataReceivedEventArgs e.

What method would be best to return e.Data to be shown in the messagebox from the original switch (perl_o)? I'm not sure how to do this. I'm not even sure if I have the most efficient method for calling perl externally. The whole application is based on perl being called externally, and returning the data. The part that calls perl is already running on a second thread. Any and all help would be appreciated as I am a beginner... be gentle :)

Edit: e.Data is not declared. It is passed when the event Perl_Output is called. The switch is for basic network commands, in this case: "PERL_TEST".

perl_o is not declared. I'm looking for a way to make perl_o = e.Data AFTER mainproc.process_file finishes it's process.

The best overall way for me would be if I could declare the function containing myProcess as string (instead of void), have the function wait for the process to finish running, then return the output of the process.

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what does the switch test? –  Tony The Lion Jan 14 '10 at 14:44
    
i think you snipped away a little too much of your code. i don't see perl_o or e.Data declared or passed in your snippets... where do they come from? How do they get there? Showing your entire methods will help. –  Paul Sasik Jan 14 '10 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Does the message have to be shown in the switch statement? If it does, then you could use wait handles or similar to block the current thread until data are returned from the new process, but this is likely not the best approach.

It might be more sensible to pass a callback into the function from the switch statement:

case "PERL_TEST":
    FileInfo fi = new FileInfo("hello.txt");
    mainproc.process_file(fi, MessageBox.Show);
    break;

Then in process_file:

public void process_file(FileInfo fi, Action<string> dataCallback)
{
    myProcess = new Process();
    ProcessStartInfo myProcessStartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo("perl.exe");
    myProcessStartInfo.Arguments = "perly.pl";
    myProcessStartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    myProcessStartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    myProcessStartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
    myProcessStartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
    myProcess.StartInfo = myProcessStartInfo;
    myProcess.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
        {
            dataCallback(e.Data);
        };
    myProcess.Start();
    myProcess.BeginOutputReadLine();
}

Or something similar to this anyway, as I can't see where you're using the FileInfo object.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, man, thanks a bundle... I learn so much everyday from this board. Haha, wow callbacks would have made my life SO much easier had I known about them. –  cam Jan 14 '10 at 14:59
    
You like that answer? Please upvote! And finally, you can accept one of the given answers (when it solves your problem). –  tanascius Jan 14 '10 at 15:02

Did you know that myProcess.Start() creates a process that runs in parallel?

You have to collect the output from the process and wait for the process to exit. I would do it like this:

myProcess.Start();
string perl_o, error;
Thread readStandardOutput = new Thread((ThreadStart)delegate 
{ 
    perl_o = myProcess.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); 
});  
Thread readStandardError = new Thread((ThreadStart)delegate 
{ 
    error = myProcess.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); 
});  

myProcess.WaitForExit();    // wait until the process exits
readStandardOutput.Join();  // wait until the thread has read all data
readStandardError.Join();   // wait until the thread has read all data
int exitCode = p.ExitCode;  // if you need the exit code from perl
return perl_o;

You should also read from StandardError because if perl write somethings to there and your app don't read it, the perl app will halt if the buffer is full. Reading has to be done on a second thread.

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Create a StringBuilder member variable in your class and in the DataReceivedEventHandler, you concatenate e.Data to your StringBuilder member variable, by calling its Append() method.

Once you're done, you call ToString() on your StringBuilder object and you have all the output.

Also, you may want to do a similar thing for the ErrorDataReceived event.

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