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I have the following Class for test !!

class ArrayClass
{
private:
    int isize;
    double* p ;
public:
    ArrayClass(int num_ =1):isize(num_),p(new double[num_])
    {
        cout << "constructor with num!!" << endl ;
        for(int idx=0;idx<num_;idx++)
        {
            p[idx] = 0.0 ;
        }
    }
    ArrayClass(const ArrayClass& m) //copy constructor
    {
        cout << "copy constructor!!" << endl ;
        isize = m.getsize() ;
        p = new double[isize] ;
        std::copy(m.getaddr(), m.getaddr() + m.getsize(), p);
    }
    ArrayClass& operator=(const ArrayClass& m) //copy assignment
    {
        cout << "copy assignment!!" << endl ;
        if(this != &m)
        {
            int msize =  m.getsize() ;
            if(isize != msize )
            {
                delete []p ;
                p = 0x00 ;
                p = msize ? new double[msize] : 0x00 ;
                isize = msize ;
            }
            std::copy(m.getaddr(), m.getaddr() + msize, p);
        }
        return *this ;
    }
    ArrayClass& operator=(ArrayClass&& m)
    {
        cout << "Move assignment!!" << endl ;
        isize = m.getsize() ;
        p = m.getaddr() ;
        m.initialize() ;
        return *this ;
    }
    ArrayClass(ArrayClass&& m)
    {
        cout << "Move Constructor!!" << endl ;
        isize = m.getsize() ;
        p = m.getaddr() ;
        m.initialize() ;
    }
    ~ArrayClass()
    {
        cout << "desctrutor!!" << endl ;
        delete []p ;
    }
    void initialize(){ isize=0; p=0x00; }
    int  getsize() const { return isize; }
    double* getaddr() const { return p; }
    double& operator[](int i)
    {
        if( i >= isize)
            throw "the bound is wrong!!" ;
        return p[i] ;
    }
    const double& operator[](int i) const
    {
        if( i >= isize)
            throw "the bound is wrong!!" ;
        return p[i] ;
    }
    void Print(void)
    {
        for(int idx=0;idx<isize;idx++)
            cout << p[idx] << " " ;
        cout << endl ;
    }
} ;

ArrayClass  func()
{
    ArrayClass m(10) ;
    for(int idx=0;idx<10;idx++)
        m[idx] = idx * idx + 1 ;
    return m ;
}

compiled at g++ 4.4.6 in RedHat Linux with g++ --std=c++0x x.cpp -o x.exe

the follwoing is what I expected :

ArrayClass m2(std::move(func())) ;
m2.Print() ;

output :

constructor with num!!
Move Constructor!!
desctrutor!!
1 2 5 10 17 26 37 50 65 82
desctrutor!!

But the following is not what I expected :

ArrayClass m2(func()) ;
m2.Print() ;

output :

constructor with num!!
1 2 5 10 17 26 37 50 65 82
desctrutor!!

I expect there should be "copy constructor!!" , I am curious , no copy constructor called , also no move constructor called in this test , how come the answer of m2.Print() is right ?!

share|improve this question
2  
How many copy/move elision questions on daily basis? –  texasbruce Dec 18 '13 at 4:24
    
And also you should expect move construction when passing an prvalue. –  texasbruce Dec 18 '13 at 4:25
    
What happens if you compile with the GCC option -fno-elide-constructors? That should give you your answer. –  Tristan Brindle Dec 18 '13 at 4:27
    
After you understand what the issue is, the lesson to take home is do not help the compiler. Let it do its magic, don't force a move when the compiler could very well elide the whole operation! –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 18 '13 at 4:35
    
@David , thanks , copy elision really help performance a lot to me! –  barfatchen Dec 18 '13 at 4:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is called copy elision (although you're basically eliding a move operation here). You can construct the object in place if the semantics remain unchanged.

share|improve this answer
    
Technically it is still called copy elision even when the operation elided is a move. 12.8/31 [...]This elision of copy/move operations, called copy elision[...] –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 18 '13 at 4:32
    
definedbehavior.blogspot.tw/2011/08/… this webpage really explain copy elision a lot !! excellent work !! –  barfatchen Dec 19 '13 at 0:50

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