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Following the guidelines given in "Clean Code" by Uncle Bob Martin, I'm trying to make my methods smaller.

One recommendation he gives is that methods that contain a trys should invoke other methods that don't involve the exceptional cases.

My problem is one of naming.

Usually by the time my method only contains the try expression, there's not much left and the name of the method perfectly describes what it does except for the exception.

What conventions do you use for naming the "non-exceptional" method that the exceptional one will call?

As an example, this is a method I'm looking at:

private void generateAndAttachDocumentFromTemplate(File templateFile) {
  try {
    File generatedDocument = generateDocumentFromTemplate(templateFile);
    if (generatedDocument != null) {
      attachDocument(generatedDocument, container);

      attachmentsPanel.reload();

      SystemControl.openDocument(generatedDocument);
    }
  } catch (Exception ex) {
    Notifier.notifyIT(App.user().getEmail(), ex);
    Dialogs.complain("Can\'t Generate Document");
  }
}
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I first worry about layering, "single reponsibility" and mutable statics. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 14 '10 at 15:33
    
I worry about that too. It's a legacy system that I'm refactoring piece by piece. –  Allain Lalonde Jan 14 '10 at 16:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I use the convention (which I think he suggests in the book) where you have methodName and tryMethodName.

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You can found this approach in MS .NET, i.e. Parse vs TryParse –  Guido García Jan 14 '10 at 15:56
    
Must have missed it. I like this. Thanks. –  Allain Lalonde Jan 14 '10 at 15:58
    
So, would the method that catches the exception be called "try___" or the other one? –  Allain Lalonde Jan 14 '10 at 16:05
    
I cannot remember exactly what he recommends so when I say I follow the book I lied. I use methodName to call tryMethodName as I think that reads better. So tryMethodName contains the code that causes the exception and method name deals with the exception –  willcodejavaforfood Jan 14 '10 at 17:22

anytime a method has doThisANDdoThat() is a bad method. methods should do ONE thing and only one thing. Regardless of how "small" they are.

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You could use the "Impl" convention.

private void generateAndAttachDocumentFromTemplate(File templateFile) {
try {
    generateAndAttachDocumentFromTemplateImpl(File templateFile);
} catch (Exception ex) {
    Notifier.notifyIT(App.user().getEmail(), ex);
    Dialogs.complain("Can\'t Generate Document");
}
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2  
I would just call the method "doGenerateAndAttachDocumentFromTemplate". "Impl" usually implies "implementation of an interface". –  matt b Jan 14 '10 at 15:26
    
Very good point. Though in my app I don't follow that particular convention, so it works. –  Allain Lalonde Jan 14 '10 at 15:32
    
Actually, I like the "do" convention better. It's a good point the "Impl" convention has an already established meaning. –  ptsw Jan 14 '10 at 15:53

Some alternatives:

  • method > doMethod
  • method > method0

The "non-exceptional" methods should be private.

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