Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got to implement a database connection pattern. I created two classes:

  • ConnectionFactory
  • MySQLService

ConnectionFactory:

<?php

  class ConnectionFactory {
    protected static $connection;

    public function getConnection() {
        if (!self::$connection) {
            self::$connection = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost;dbname=sapienter', "root", "admin");
        }
        return self::$connection;
    }
  }

?>

MySQLService:

<?php

  class MySQLService {
    protected $connectionFactory;

    public function __construct(ConnectionFactory $factory) {
      $this->connectionFactory = $factory;
    }

    public function listItemsForSharerSQL() {
      $conn = $this->connectionFactory->getConnection();
      $items = ...
      return $items;
    }
  }

?>

I call these methods in my controller ItemController:

<?php

require_once ROOT_DIR . "/models/Item.php";
require_once ROOT_DIR . "/ConnectionFactory.php";
require_once ROOT_DIR . "/MySQLService.php";

class ItemController {

    private $data;

    public function listItemsForSharer() {
        $connFactory = new ConnectionFactory();
        $service = new MySQLService($connFactory);
        $items = $service->listItemsForSharerSQL();

        $this->data = ['items' => $items];
        return 'itemslistforsharer-view';
    }
}

?>

I don't like the fact that I've got to instantiate a new ConnectionFactory in my Controller. Is it a mistake? Should I change my code design?

share|improve this question
    
Well, then move the construction into the constructor of the MySqlService class... –  arkascha Dec 18 '13 at 9:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is mistake that you are using a Database in a Controller at all. If talking about a Controller from the MVC Architecture pattern, then its Models job to interact with the database. There should be only instances of the Models in the controllers, but not instances of the Database.

Basically in the modern MVC frameworks that Models are extending the base Model class, which has the instantiation of the database.

As I understand, MySQLService is something like a model since you are returning some items, it seems like you are doing DB operation and want to handle it from a controller. Instead of every model having its own constructor, you should use a base class. I would suggest something like:

class Model {

    protected function getAdapter() {
        $connection = new ConnectionFactory();
        return $connection->getConnection();
    }

}


class MySQLService extends Model {

    public function listItemsForSharerSQL() {
      $this->getAdapter();
      $items = ...
      return $items;
    }
}

So now your controller will only need

$service = new MySQLService();

Ofcourse you base class can have the getAdapter() method as a constructor, without any params, so you won't need to pass anything to the MySQLService and won't need to call getAdapther() in each method of MySQLService. Depends on your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to split Model layer between Domain objects and Data Mappers. My Domain objects (e.g. Item) are unaware of storage. MySQLService should be my Data Mapper. So I would instantiate MySQLService in my controller, as you propose, and then do for example: $items = $service->findAllItems();. Is it right? –  Kurt Bourbaki Dec 18 '13 at 10:07
1  
Seems like a right decision. You just need to get rid of a constructor which accept db object params :) –  Royal Bg Dec 18 '13 at 10:09
    
Is it a bad habit? –  Kurt Bourbaki Dec 18 '13 at 10:13
1  
For multiple instantiations it is. It's ok if you are instantiating the object from one place, i.e. if an application class instantiates all if you models, injecting them the database, but since you are using them as an independent objects, you don't need this. You now are telling the constructor, accept params only if they are object of type ConnectionFactory, thus you need ConnectionFactory being instantiated from anywhere you want to instantiate you MySQLService class. So you explictly make you life harder by saying this to the constructor –  Royal Bg Dec 18 '13 at 10:15
    
Thank you: I tried it and it works :) –  Kurt Bourbaki Dec 18 '13 at 10:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.