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I have currently used SWIG to convert some C++ libraries that I need to C# to use them a use-case that I am implementing in C#, the output was some CS files that must be included in the project and there is a projectNameBridge.dll file.

Including all these cs in my project is making it looks a bit messy, so I was wondering if there is a way to wrap these CS files in a DLL that could be a added directly as a reference to contain all these files.

Any suggestions?

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You can add directories to a solution ... –  Alex K. Dec 18 '13 at 10:24
    
I will post a quick dll creation how-to just shortly for you:) –  GMasucci Dec 18 '13 at 11:25
    
There you go pictured and explained answer for you:) Let me know if you need any extra information. I have included an extra preface on compilation targets for dlls as well at the start of the answer. –  GMasucci Dec 18 '13 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Note regarding DLL compilation


Visual studio has at least three compilation targets available (dependant on what you have installed etc):

  • x86 - x64 - anycpu

How these interact and co-habit can be a pain if not done correctly and they behave differently dependant on the bit-count of the OS you are utilising, therefore I have prepended a small, quick guide to how the bitness (for lack of a better term) causes interplay between different setups:

Lets take 3 DLL files, all with the same code in them which we, in true Blue Peter fashion, prepared earlier:

  • anycpu.dll -- compiled anycpu
  • x86.dll -- compiled x86
  • x64.dll -- compiled x64

And 3 executable files all doing the same: calling a console output of "Bitness interplay" from a dll.

  • anycpu.exe -- compiled anycpu
  • x86.exe -- compiled x86
  • x64.exe -- compiled x64

The code is identical in all cases however the compilation target has changed, and they work/refuse to work in 32/64 bit OS variants as follows:

32-Bit OS

  • anycpu.exe -- Executes as: 32-bit process DLL Usage: can load anycpu.dll and x86.dll Causes BadImageFormatException if it tries to load x64.dll
  • x86.exe -- Executes as: 32-bit process DLL Usage: can load anycpu.dll and x86.dll Causes BadImageFormatException if it tries to load x64.dll
  • x64.exe -- Executes as: BadImageFormatException when it tries to run

64-Bit OS

  • anycpu.exe -- Executes as: 64-bit process DLL Usage: can load anycpu.dll and x64.dll Causes BadImageFormatException if it tries to load x86.dll
  • x86.exe -- Executes as: 32-bit process DLL Usage: can load anycpu.dll and x86.dll Causes BadImageFormatException if it tries to load `x64.dll
  • x64.exe -- Executes as: 64-bit process DLL Usage: can load anycpu.dll and x64.dll Causes BadImageFormatException if it tries to load x86.dll

So, unless you truly need a certain Bitness/bitlyness (there is no nice word for it!) I would stick to the anycpu compilation target: its a little less perfect than specific targeting but your creation should do you proud regardless of the flavour of bits (there that's a nicer way to say it) you happen to be running on.


Important:

My brother made a good point that bears mentioning: some SDKs require a particular compilation target (ANYCPU, x84, x64 etc) and utilising the wrong one can cause compile-/run-time errors.


Start the project

To create a DLL file in C# is even more straightforward than in C++: Firstly we create a new project, based on the class library type

Starting a dll project

After having set the relative parameters of your choice and subsequently hitting the "OK" button we are just about done, as VS neatly brings us into the C# file you specified in the previous screen.

May as well add some code to perform the actions we require the DLL to be able to carry out...

Let's go!

Now that the code is in place, you can build the project using Release or Debug mode (whichever suits your needs most closely).

Build the DLL

Navigate to the relevant build folder..... Navigate to the relevant folder Et Voila! your shiny new DLL is ready to use!

And now you can call the DLL from another C# project at your leisure:)


Hope this helps, and, let me know if you need any more information:)

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woah, thats a lot of info –  athabaska Dec 20 '13 at 7:50
    
Thanks a lot. Really appreciated :) –  eMizo Dec 23 '13 at 10:59
    
"Bitness/bitlyness (there is no nice word for it!)" - its called "CPU Architecture"; its also worth noting that for some SDKs selecting anything other than ANY CPU will cause compile-time/runtime errors (SharePoint 2010 and above). –  Mauro Mar 27 '14 at 13:38
    
True, will add that part in:) –  GMasucci Mar 27 '14 at 14:59

Put them into separate project with output type of "Class library"?

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