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I continually get these errors when I try to update tables based on another table. I end up rewriting the query, change the order of joins, change some groupings and then it eventually works, but I just don't quite get it.

What is a 'multi-part identifier'?
When is a 'multi-part identifier' not able to be bound?
What is it being bound to anyway?
In what cases will this error occur?
What are the best ways to prevent it?

The specific error from SQL Server 2005 is:

The multi-part identifier "..." could not be bound.
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closed as off-topic by Wooble, me how, R.J, Duncan, Bobby Oct 30 '13 at 12:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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10 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

A multipart identifier is any description of a field or table that contains multiple parts - for instance MyTable.SomeRow - if it can't be bound that means there's something wrong with it - either you've got a simple typo, or a confusion between table and column. It can also be caused by using reserved words in your table or field names and not surrounding them with [].

Something like redgate sql prompt is brilliant for avoiding having to manually type these (it even auto-completes joins based on foreign keys), but isn't free. SQL server 2008 supports intellisense out of the box, although it isn't quite as complete as the redgate version.

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Intellisense has definitely helped reduce my typos. –  Even Mien Apr 14 '09 at 13:05
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It's probably a typo. Look for the places in your code where you call [schema].[TableName] (basically anywhere you reference a field) and make sure everything is spelled correctly.

Personally, I try to avoid this by using aliases for all my tables. It helps tremendously when you can shorten a long table name to an acronym of it's description (i.e. WorkOrderParts -> WOP), and also makes your query more readable.

Edit: As an added bonus, you'll save TONS of keystrokes when all you have to type is a three or four-letter alias vs. the schema, table, and field names all together.

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Actually sometimes when you are updating one table from another table's data, I think one of the common issues that cause this error, is when you use your table abbreviations incorrectly. The correct statement is below:

Update Table1
Set SomeField = t2.SomeFieldValue 
From Table1 t1 
Inner Join Table2 as t2
    On t1.ID = t2.ID

Notice that SomeField column from Table1 doesn't say t1.SomeField. If you try to update by saying t1.SomeField the statement will return the multi-part error that you have noticed.

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If you are sure that it is not a typo spelling-wise, perhaps it is a typo case-wise.

What collation are you using? Check it.

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Binding = your textual representation of a specific column gets mapped to a physical column in some table, in some database, on some server.

Multipart identifier could be: MyDatabase.dbo.MyTable. If you get any of these identifiers wrong, then you have a multipart identifier that cannot be mapped.

The best way to avoid it is to write the query right the first time, or use a plugin for management studio that provides intellisense and thus help you out by avoiding typos.

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When updating tables make sure you do not reference the field your updating via the alias.

I just had the error with the following code

update [page] 
set p.pagestatusid = 1
from [page] p
join seed s on s.seedid = p.seedid
where s.providercode = 'agd'
and p.pagestatusid = 0

I had to remove the alias reference in the set statement so it reads like this

update [page] 
set pagestatusid = 1
from [page] p
join seed s on s.seedid = p.seedid
where s.providercode = 'agd'
and p.pagestatusid = 0
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You probably have a typo. For instance, if you have a table named Customer in a database named Sales, you could refer to it as Sales..Customer (although it is better to refer to it including the owner name (dbo is the default owner) like Sales.dbo.Customer.

If you typed Sales...Customer, you might have got the message you got.

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I found that I get these a lot when I try to abbreviate, such as:

Table1 t1, Table2 t2 
where t1.ID = t2.ID

Changing it to:

Table1, Table2 
where Table1.ID = Table2.ID

Makes the query work and not throw the error.

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I had this issue and it turned out to be an incorrect table alias. Correcting this resolved the issue.

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Mine was putting the schema on the table Alias by mistake:

SELECT * FROM schema.CustomerOrders co
WHERE schema.co.ID = 1  -- oops!
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