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In the Java tutorial write ' The only difference is that the prefix version (++result) evaluates to the incremented value, whereas the postfix version (result++) evaluates to the original value. '

Why is the result of this expression is different if them have a same operators (but have different order of operators ...)?

    //here:

    int i8 = 2;
    i8 = (++i8*i8++) + i8;

     //this is simple
    //  i8 = (3*3) + 3
    // i8 + 1 = 13

    System.out.println("i8 = " + i8);
    // i8 = 13

    int i9 = 2;
    i9 = i9 + (++i9 * i9++);

    //  i9 = 2 + ( 3*3)
    //why 2? if ++i9 has a first priority and don't adds to incremented value 1 
    // i9 = 11
    //why i9++ don't add a 1??

    System.out.println("i9 = " + i9);
    // i9 = 11

    // another example:

    int i10 = 2;
    i10 = ++i10 * i10 + i10;
    System.out.println("i10 = " + i10);
    // i10 = 12

    int i11 = 2;
    i11 = i11 + ++i11 * i11;
    System.out.println("i11 = " + i11);
          //i11 = 11

    /* print out
     * 
    i8 = 13
    i9 = 11
    i10 = 12
    i11 = 11
    */

I want understand how it works. Why is in example with i8 result = 13, but in next example with i9 result =11. Why in the second example (2 + (3*3)) the first value is 2 (but in first (3*3) + 4) , if the first operator by priority must be ++i9 , and i9 after that = 3 and (3 + (3*3)) ?

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what do you mean why? it is made that way. this is how it works, what kind of answer do you expect? –  Nanne Dec 18 '13 at 10:39
    
looks like homework.... my C Prof liked to do these things with pointer arithmetics. –  L. Möller Dec 18 '13 at 10:41
    
Yes, want understand how it works –  Rom4 Dec 18 '13 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

That's because the expression is evaluated from left-to-right.

Step-by-step break up:

0. i9 = 2
1. i9 + (++i9 * i9++);
2. 2 + (3 * 3) // assigning values from left to right(i9++ won't take effect as of now since its post increment)
3. 2 + (9) // VBODMAS rule is applied here
4. i9 = 11 // Your output

And the same can be applied to all the other examples as well and you can see that it'd evaluate to the answer you got.

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1. ++i9 i9=3 wright? 2. (3 * 3) 3. 2+ 9. Why second value in multiplicative operation is 3, but in operation additive is 2 (2 + (3*3) if i9 = 3 –  Rom4 Dec 18 '13 at 12:06

Here is a step by step explanation:

                             | value of a
-----------------------------------------
0.)  a = a + (++a * a++);    |          2  (This is the initial setup)
1.)  a = 2 + (++a * a++);    |          2
2.)  a = 2 + (3 * a++);      |          3
3.)  a = 2 + (3 * 3);        |          4
4.)  a = 11;                 |         11

The trick is in step 3: Here, a is incremented after the value is used in the expression (3 * 3). But in step 4 another value is assigned to a: the result of the whole expression. The value 4 is "swallowed" at this point.

Check here, for the precedence and associativity of operators, this would explain the other cases as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I've also thought about this. But this should still be true for the other case –  Raffaele Rossi Dec 18 '13 at 10:54
    
Ok. Why first value = 2? If the first operator ++a by precedence order. –  Rom4 Dec 18 '13 at 11:59
    
The expression is evaluated from left to right. So: the leftmost a (in your case i9 = i9 + (++i9 * i9++); it is the leftmost i9) does not have an operator. Therefore it is evaluated as it is. –  Moritz Petersen Dec 18 '13 at 16:45

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