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Hey guys I have the date "01.01.1000 AD"(SimpleDate) as String and dd.MM.yyyy G(SimpleFormat) and need to parse it into a Standard ISO-Date in the form 1995-12-31T23:59:59Z (yyyy-MM-dd'T'hh:mm:ss'Z')

my actual code is:

public static String getISODate(String simpleDate, String simpleFormat, String isoFormat) throws ParseException {
    Date date;
    if (simpleFormat.equals("long")) {
        date = new Date(Long.parseLong(simpleDate));
    } else {
        SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat(simpleFormat);
        df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
        // or else testcase
        // "1964-02-24" would
        // result "1964-02-23"
        date = df.parse(simpleDate);
    }
    return getISODate(date, isoFormat);
}

Does anyone have an idea how do I do that?

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marked as duplicate by Cruncher, Zong Zheng Li, Vivien Barousse, karlphillip, PaulProgrammer Dec 18 '13 at 16:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What calendar does 01.01.1000 AD refers to? –  Raffaele Dec 18 '13 at 12:15
2  
Have a look at DateFormat‌​, especially the parse and format methods. –  sp00m Dec 18 '13 at 12:16
    
With a 1000 AD date, you have to take interesting phenomena into account such as the transition from Julian to Gregorian in 1582, and the fact that a location will have had a multitude of different time zones in the past 1000 years. –  Mzzl Dec 18 '13 at 12:18
    
And stackoverflow.com/questions/3914404/… –  reindeer Dec 18 '13 at 12:18
    
String isoFormat is null in my case –  Sebastian Röher Dec 18 '13 at 12:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

    String string = "01.01.1000 AD";
    SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy GG");
    Date date = dateFormat.parse(string);

The G in the date format stands for era.

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/text/SimpleDateFormat.html

share|improve this answer
    
I still get there an exeption java.text.ParseException: Unparseable date: "01.01.1000 AD" –  Sebastian Röher Dec 18 '13 at 12:42
    
I can reproduce your error if I set the locale like so: SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy GG", Locale.GERMANY);, so it looks like a locale issue. –  Pieter Dec 18 '13 at 13:08

This will hopefully help [tricky with standard jdk, but at least possible - and JSR 310 doesn't support this feature :-( ]:

DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy GG", Locale.US);
DateFormat iso = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
try {
    Date d = df.parse("01.01.1000 AD");
    System.out.println(iso.format(d)); // year-of-era => 1000-01-01 (not iso!!!)

    // now let us configure gregorian/julian date change right for ISO-8601
    GregorianCalendar isoCalendar = new GregorianCalendar();
    isoCalendar.setGregorianChange(new Date(Long.MIN_VALUE));
    iso.setCalendar(isoCalendar);
    System.out.println(iso.format(d)); // proleptic iso year: 1000-01-06
} catch (ParseException ex) {
    ex.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
And by the way, related to historic dates there is no sense to format in ISO including hours or even milliseconds. Therefore I have intentionally left out the time part. –  Meno Hochschild Dec 18 '13 at 13:24
    
And in order to avoid DST effects it is wise to set in both format objects df and iso the timezone to UTC. Good luck. –  Meno Hochschild Dec 18 '13 at 13:25
    
the problem is i need it as iso-date for my Solr-Index, and Solr can only work with ISO-date if u want to search facet 8thats what i need to do) –  Sebastian Röher Dec 18 '13 at 13:48
    
Now that works for me, the Problem was the wrong locale 'public static String getISODate(String simpleDate, String simpleFormat, String isoFormat) throws ParseException { Date date; if (simpleFormat.equals("long")) { date = new Date(Long.parseLong(simpleDate)); } else { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat(simpleFormat, Locale.US); df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); date = df.parse(simpleDate); } return getISODate(date, isoFormat); }` –  Sebastian Röher Dec 18 '13 at 13:57
    
First thing to note: With Locale.US the code will successfully parse. Second: 01.01.1000 AD is correctly translated to 1000-01-06 (pure ISO). Third: Because of lack of support in java I leave out the historical detail that in most countries of Europe at that time the year did not start at first of January, but in March or April. Fourth: If you really need time part for solr-interface just set it to midnight. –  Meno Hochschild Dec 18 '13 at 13:57

Something like this?

String date = "01.01.1000 AD";   
SimpleDateFormat parserSDF = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.mm.yyyy GG");   
System.out.println(parserSDF.parse(date));   
share|improve this answer
2  
MM must be used for months. –  sp00m Dec 18 '13 at 12:23

Try it may be help:

public static String getISODate(String simpleDate, String simpleFormat, String isoFormat) throws ParseException {
    Date date;
    if (simpleFormat.equals("long")) {
        date = new Date(Long.parseLong(simpleDate));
    } else {
        SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat(simpleFormat);
        df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ"));
        // or else testcase
        // "1964-02-24" would
        // result "1964-02-23"
        date = df.parse(simpleDate);
    }
    return getISODate(date, isoFormat);
}
share|improve this answer
    
yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ is not a valid timezone identifier, but a pattern string for SimpleDateFormat. –  Meno Hochschild Dec 18 '13 at 12:53
    
also still java.text.ParseException: Unparseable date: "01.01.1000 AD" –  Sebastian Röher Dec 18 '13 at 12:54
    
That is because for the timezone you entered, the moment 00:00:00 01-01-1000 AD does not exist. You will see the same error for a 1 hour period every year, if you pick a date/time instant in the hour that is skipped at the start of daylight saving time. –  Mzzl Dec 19 '13 at 13:58

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