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I am trying to do something like this, i.e., use an array in a switch statement. Is it possible in Java? If it isn't, please explain a possible solution.

boolean[] values = new boolean[4];

values[0] = true;
values[1] = false;
values[2] = false;
values[3] = true;

switch (values) {
    case [true, false, true, false]:
        break;
    case [false, false, true, false]:
        break;
    default:
        break;
}
share|improve this question
5  
I think best is to use an if statement and avoid the switch –  Mukul Goel Dec 18 '13 at 13:53
54  
I think that you should ask yourself why your execution should depend on a boolean array. Maybe a class could better contain this data with methods that have more semantics (and are more easily tested)? As you have written it, it looks like a future maintenance nightmare. –  Eric Wilson Dec 18 '13 at 13:56
1  
Use a loop to set bits on an int based on the array index, and switch off that. –  octal9 Dec 18 '13 at 15:49
15  
What you want is called "pattern matching", but you can't do it in Java. –  Ingo Dec 18 '13 at 16:07
10  
It sounds like you are trying to implement bit flags - see this question: Implementing a bitfield using java enums –  T. Kiley Dec 18 '13 at 20:13

13 Answers 13

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Try this solution:

    boolean[] values = new boolean[4];
    values[0] = true;
    values[1] = false;
    values[2] = false;
    values[3] = true;

    if (ArrayUtils.isEquals(values, new boolean[] {true, false, true, false})) {
    ...
    }
    else if (ArrayUtils.isEquals(values, new boolean[] {false, false, true, false})) {
    ...
    }
    else {
    ...
    }

See docs here.

share|improve this answer
50  
This is a solution really tight up to the size of the array, the moment the array as to change in size, you'll have a maintenance nightmare. –  Jonathan Drapeau Dec 18 '13 at 14:09
95  
They named a function isEquals?? –  phresnel Dec 18 '13 at 15:59
19  
@phresnel welcome to java? –  Rob Dec 18 '13 at 16:52
9  
There's no need for apache-commons-lang - just use java.util.Arrays.equals(arr1,arr2) from the JDK. –  Ed Staub Dec 18 '13 at 17:59
10  
@drigoangelo: I know I know. But I wonder why they didn't just use isEqual, so either verb adjective or verb noun, instead of verb verb. Personally, I just prefer adjective for boolean functions, and verb for procedures that change state. –  phresnel Dec 18 '13 at 18:24

@sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ is right. But I wanted to add something. Since Java 7, switch statements support Strings, so you could do something with that. It is really dirty and I do not recommend, but this works:

boolean[] values = new boolean[4];

values[0] = true;
values[1] = false;
values[2] = false;
values[3] = true;

switch (Arrays.toString(values)) {
    case "[true, false, true, false]":
        break;
    case "[false, false, true, false]":
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

For those concerned about performance: you are right, this is not super fast. This will be compiled into something like this:

String temp = Arrays.toString(values)
int hash = temp.hashCode();
switch (hash)
{
    case 0x23fe8da: // Assume this is the hashCode for that
                    // original string, computed at compile-time
        if (temp.equals("[true, false, true, false]"))
        {

        }
        break;
    case 0x281ddaa:
        if (temp.equals("[false, false, true, false]"))
        {

        }
        break;

    default: break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty neutral +-1. It would be very slow. Also I didn't think you were supposed to parse toString output in any way. –  Bathsheba Dec 18 '13 at 14:04
    
My initial thought was bitwise operations then this but I don't like it as a solution. –  Todor Grudev Dec 18 '13 at 14:04
65  
Creative and terrible at the same time. +1 –  David Dec 18 '13 at 14:05
3  
Too restricted to the size of the array, if the array as to change in size, what a mess it is to maintain. –  Jonathan Drapeau Dec 18 '13 at 14:08
1  
There is this blasé attitude towards performance. This type of problem is very commonly resolved with setting bits in an int -- yet you convert to and compare strings. In Java. –  bobobobo Dec 19 '13 at 13:46

NO, simply you cannot.

SwitchStatement:
    switch ( Expression ) SwitchBlock

The type of the Expression must be char, byte, short, int, Character, Byte, Short, Integer, String, or an enum type (§8.9), or a compile-time error occurs.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-14.html#jls-14.11

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This is correct as far as I'm concerned, though some good efforts in the other answers for a good solution. –  itcouldevenbeaboat Dec 18 '13 at 19:22
7  
Honestly this is the best answer. I'm not sure the type of gymnastics required to make the original problem work should be encouraged. –  Chris Lively Dec 18 '13 at 22:46

You can't switch on whole arrays. But you could convert to a bit set at the expense of some readability of the switch itself:

switch (values[0] + 2 * values[1] + 4 * values[2] + 8 * values[3])

and use binary literals in your case statements: case 0b0101 is your first one.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is certainly possible, but is that a good solution to the real problem? –  Eric Wilson Dec 18 '13 at 13:58
5  
To make this extendable, I'd put it in a loop: int switchVal = 0; for (int i = 0; i < values.length(); i++) { switchVal += values[i] ? (2 << i) : 0; } and then switch on the switchVal variable. –  Darrel Hoffman Dec 18 '13 at 15:47
3  
And to make the switch more readable/meaningful, consider making each of those binary literals a meaningful constant so you are switching on constants, not binary literals. –  rrauenza Dec 18 '13 at 19:21
3  
This is basically converting [true, false, true, false] to the series of bits 1010, which can be switched on, right? Definitely the way to go IMO. –  Izkata Dec 18 '13 at 21:33
    
I wanted to show a binary example using Lambda in Java SE 8 but wasn't sure if I would get flamed for that. I'll wait until March. –  ialexander Dec 18 '13 at 23:29

Yes, you can pass an array to a switch. The catch is that I'm not talking about Java arrays, but a data structure.

An array is a systematic arrangement of objects, usually in rows and columns.

What you are trying to do is implement a system that recognizes different flags and depending on the flags that are turned on or off you take different actions.

Example

A popular implementation of such mechanism is Linux file permissions. Where you have rwx as the "array of flags".

If the whole array is true, you'll see rwx, which means that you have all the permissions. If you are not allowed to perform any action on a file, the whole array is false, you'll see ---.

Implementation

Guess what, you can think of integers as arrays. An integer is represented by an "array of bits".

001 // 1, if on, set x 
010 // 2, if on, set w 
100 // 4, if on, set r
// putting it all together in a single "array" (integer)
111 // 2^2 + 2^1 + 2^0 = 4 + 2 + 1 = 7

That is why the permission rwx can be represented as a 7

Java snippet:

class Flags {                                                                    
public static void main(String args[]) {         
        /** 
         * Note the notation "0b", for binary; I'm using it for emphasis.
         * You could just do: 
         * byte flags = 6;
         */                     
        byte flags = 0b110; // 6                     
        switch(flags) {                                                          
            case 0: /* do nothing */ break;                                      
            case 3: /* execute and write */ break;                       
            case 6: System.out.println("read and write\n"); break;         
            case 7: /* grant all permissions */ break;                           
            default:                                                             
                System.out.println("invalid flag\n");           
        }                                                                        
    }                                                                            
}

To know more about using a binary format, check this question: In Java, can I define an integer constant in binary format?

Performance

  • Saves memory
  • You don't have to do extra processing, switches or any other type of juggling.

C programs that require to be as efficient as possible use this type of mechanism; they use flags represented with single bits.

share|improve this answer

No, you cannot, however you can replace the above with the following (dirty I admit) code:

boolean[] values = new boolean[4];

values[0] = true;
values[1] = false;
values[2] = false;
values[3] = true;

switch(makeSuitableForSwitch(values)) {
   case 1010: 
     break;
   case 10: 
     break;
   default:
     break;
} 

private int makeSuitableForSwitch( boolean[] values) {
    return (values[0]?1:0)*1000+(values[1]?1:0)*100+(values[2]?1:0)*10+(values[3]?1:0);
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I would put the sum formula into a method instead of directly in the switch statement. –  Jonathan Drapeau Dec 18 '13 at 13:55
8  
Apart from the fact that it is errr ugly it is wrong: 0010 is interpreted as octal... –  Gyro Gearless Dec 18 '13 at 13:58
2  
@Alex helper method should be private ;) Also it's not a good idea to return int since for big arrays this might overflow. –  Maroun Maroun Dec 18 '13 at 14:00
1  
I like this, in as much as it seems like it would be easier to maintain vs mammoth if/else statements in the accepted answer –  WernerCD Dec 18 '13 at 16:25
1  
Also, why (values[0]?1:0)*1000 if you can do values[0]?1000:0? –  Cruncher Dec 18 '13 at 18:59

If you're trying to determine if a set of conditions is true, I'd use bitwise fields instead.

For example,

public class HelloWorld
{
  // These are the options that can be set.
  // They're final so treated as constants.
  static final int A=1<<0, B=1<<1, C=1<<2, D=1<<3 ;

  public static void main(String []args)
  {
    // Now I set my options to have A=true, B=true, C=true, D=false, effectively
    int options = A | B | C ;

    switch( options )
    {
      case (A):
        System.out.println( "just A" ) ;
        break ;
      case (A|B):
        System.out.println( "A|B" ) ;
        break ;
      case (A|B|C): // Final int is what makes this work
        System.out.println( "A|B|C" ) ;
        break ;
      default:
        System.out.println( "unhandled case" ) ;
        break ;
    }
  }
}
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I'd compute a value based on the sequence of the elements in the boolean array, i.e. [true, false, true, true] would evaluate to 1011 and then based on this integer value you can use switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Make sure that if you change the length (or order) of the array, it still works, if you want to avoid a rewrite of every 'case' statement. If Java doesn't permit a function call for each 'case', a massive if chain will be required, possibly with an associative array for each alternative case and a function call for each if test. –  Phil Perry Dec 18 '13 at 18:50

The answer is NO. The best explain is learn how to use the switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Switch statements only take ints, chars, bytes, shorts, and enum types. The "right" way to do it would be either a big if..else block, or to somehow render the array of booleans down to an integer and act accordingly. Maybe treat it as a bitmask? –  David Dec 18 '13 at 13:54
1  
Java switches also take strings –  Bathsheba Dec 18 '13 at 14:07
2  
@Bathsheba For Java7+. –  Maroun Maroun Dec 18 '13 at 14:12

As of JRE 1.7, you will need to use a hack, I recommend:

  • Assume values.length <= 64

  • Convert values to a long representing bitflags

  • Switch against hexadecimal magic numbers

Java Code Hack:

if(values.length > 64)
  throw new IllegalStateException();

long bitflags = 0x0L;

for(int i=0; i< values.length; ++i)
  if(values[i])
    bitflags |= 0x01L << i;

switch(bitflags) {
  case 0xEL: // represents [true,  true,  true, false]
    break;
  case 0xAL: // represents [true,  false, true, false]
    break;
  case 0x2L: // represents [false, false, true, false]
    break;
  default:
    break;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another approach requiring no imports nor libraries:

boolean[] values = new boolean[4];

values[0] = true;
values[1] = false;
values[2] = false;
values[3] = true;

int mask = buildMask(values);

if (areEquals(mask, true, false, true, false)) {
    // ...
} else if (areEquals(mask, false, false, true, false)) {
    // ...
} else {
    // ...
}

private int buildMask(boolean... values) {
    int n = 0;
    for (boolean b : values) {
        n = (n << 1) | (b ? 1 : 0);
    }
    return n;
}

private boolean areEquals(int mask, boolean... values) {
    return mask == buildMask(values);
}
share|improve this answer

This answer is not Java, but Haxe because it is possible in it, thanks to pattern matching and has interesting output, which might be useful for you to find a switch that does what you are asking for. Arrays can be matched on fixed length.

I created an demo that compiles to Javascript and Flash. You can see the js-output in the right column.

Demo: http://try.haxe.org/#86314

class Test {
  static function main(){

    var array=[true,false,true];

    var result=switch(array){
      case [true,true,false]: "no";
      case [true,false,true]: "yes";
      default:"??";
    }

    #if js
      new js.JQuery("body").html(result);
    #elseif flash
      trace(result);
    #end

    // ouputs: "yes"
  }
}

This is the outputted switch, it uses nested switches. If you play with the cases, you see how the js-ouput changes to have a efficient switch.

(function () { "use strict";
var Test = function() { };
Test.main = function() {
    var array = [true,false,true,false];
    var result;
    switch(array.length) {
    case 4:
        switch(array[0]) {
        case true:
            switch(array[1]) {
            case false:
                switch(array[2]) {
                case true:
                    switch(array[3]) {
                    case false:
                        result = "no";
                        break;
                    default:
                        result = "??";
                    }
                    break;
                default:
                    result = "??";
                }
                break;
            default:
                result = "??";
            }
            break;
        case false:
            switch(array[1]) {
            case false:
                switch(array[2]) {
                case true:
                    switch(array[3]) {
                    case false:
                        result = "yes";
                        break;
                    default:
                        result = "??";
                    }
                    break;
                default:
                    result = "??";
                }
                break;
            default:
                result = "??";
            }
            break;
        }
        break;
    default:
        result = "??";
    }
    new js.JQuery("body").html(result);
};
var js = {};
var q = window.jQuery;
js.JQuery = q;
Test.main();
})();

Another interesting pattern that you can use underscores. a _ pattern matches anything, so case _: is equal to default, which makes you able to do this:

var myArray = [1, 6];
var match = switch(myArray) {
    case [2, _]: "0";
    case [_, 6]: "1";
    case []: "2";
    case [_, _, _]: "3";
    case _: "4";
}
trace(match); // 1

http://haxe.org/manual/pattern_matching#array-matching

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You can also take a look at how Groovy implements the isCase() methods in Java, use a simpler version that fits your needs. It's possible to put that in an interface and create a DSL to compare any two object in your application.

return isCase(DefaultTypeTransformation.asCollection(caseValue), switchValue);

The relevant code is covered in Lines 877 through Lines 982

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