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I need help on my coding here. I want to convert RGB value (decimal) to binary value. But whenever there should be '0' bit in front of the binary value, the result didn't displayed the '0' bit.

Example: decimal = 94, binary = 0101 1110. But my result displayed 101 1110 instead.

I want to analyze all the binary bits for my program, image steganalysis. If there's not enough 8 binary bits I'm afraid there would be an error.

These are my codings:

public class getPixelData 
{
private static final double bitPerColor = 4.0;

public getPixelData()
{

}

public int[] getPixelData(BufferedImage img, int w, int h) throws IOException
{
    int argb = img.getRGB(w, h);
    int rgb[] = new int[]
    {
        (argb >> 16) & 0xff, //red
        (argb >>  8) & 0xff, //green
        (argb      ) & 0xff  //blue
    };

    int red = rgb[0];
    int green = rgb[1]; //RGB Value in Decimal
    int blue = rgb[2];

    System.out.println("\nRGBValue in Decimal --> " + "\nRed: " + red + " Green: " + green + " Blue: " + blue);

    //Convert each channel RGB to Hexadecimal value
    String rHex = Integer.toHexString((int)(red));
    String gHex = Integer.toHexString((int)(green));
    String bHex = Integer.toHexString((int)(blue));

    System.out.println("\nRGBValue in Hexa --> " + "\nRed Green Blue " + rHex + gHex + bHex);

    //Convert each channel RGB to binary
    String r4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(red));
    String g4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(green));
    String b4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(blue));

    //Convert concatonate 0's in front to get desired bit count
    int rDifference = (int)bitPerColor - r4bit.length();
    int gDifference = (int)bitPerColor - g4bit.length();
    int bDifference = (int)bitPerColor - b4bit.length();

    //this code should work but i guess it isn't
    for (int i = rDifference; i > 0; i--)
    {
        r4bit = "0" + r4bit;
    }

    for (int i = gDifference; i > 0; i--)
    {
        g4bit = "0" + g4bit;
    }

    for (int i = bDifference; i > 0; i--)
    {
        b4bit = "0" + b4bit;
    }


    System.out.println("\nRGB Value in binary (Red) is: " + r4bit);
    System.out.println("RGB Value in binary (Green) is: " + g4bit);
    System.out.println("RGB Value in binary (Blue) is: " + b4bit);

    return rgb;
    }
    }

What should I add to my coding here? FYI, I'm still new to Java language. Do correct me if I've done any mistakes here.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

Don't you need to divide it by the power?

float power = Math.pow(2, 4);
String r4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(red/power));
String g4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(green/power));
String b4bit = Integer.toBinaryString((int)(blue/power));
share|improve this answer
    
I've done that before. It didn't display full 8 binary bits. Just display first 4 binary bits only –  user2890264 Dec 18 '13 at 14:52

You need to pad them with 0's yourself. Here's the similar question if i got you right: Binary format of an integer

share|improve this answer
    
I read that and I don't really understand the code. Can you guide me on how to pad it with 0 bits? –  user2890264 Dec 18 '13 at 17:22

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