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Here's my Oracle (11g) table:

--------------------------
|MyTable                 |
--------------------------
|UserID    |Date         |
--------------------------
|1          |4/29/2011   |
|1          |6/13/2013   |
|2          |5/3/2001    |
|2          |2/3/2011    |
|3          |12/3/2009   |
|3          |4/3/2011    |
--------------------------

If I perform the following SQL:

SELECT MAX(Date) AS upd_dt, UserID 
FROM MyTable
GROUP BY upd_dt, UserID

I get:

--------------------------
|User ID    |Date        |
--------------------------
|1          |6/13/2013   |
|2          |2/3/2011    |
|3          |4/3/2011    |
--------------------------

Which I understand. I now want to perform a SELECT on these results and get the row with the most recent date and its userID. Is there a way to SELECT from a SELECT? Something like:

SELECT MAX(upd_dt) AS maxdt, UserID 
FROM (    
        SELECT MAX(Date) AS upd_dt, UserID 
        FROM MyTable
        GROUP BY upd_dt, UserID
     )

GROUP BY maxdt, UserID
share|improve this question
    
why don't you use where rownum = 1 order by upd_dt desc?? –  jcho360 Dec 18 '13 at 19:31
    
@jcho360 It will not work without a subquery –  gpeche Dec 18 '13 at 19:54
    
I'm not talking to make that in the subquery –  jcho360 Dec 18 '13 at 20:08
    
In general, you can use a query in place of a table name. In relational theory you can always do that, but in practical implementation there are limits. A table, a view, and the result set of a query are all relations (that's what "relational" refers to). –  David Aldridge Dec 18 '13 at 20:38
1  
@jcho360 as far as I know you have to put the ORDER BY inside a subquery and the WHERE ROWNUM = 1 outside that subquery. Otherwise you filter before ordering. –  gpeche Dec 19 '13 at 11:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would say that your first query should be more like:

SELECT MAX(Date) AS upd_dt, UserID 
FROM MyTable
GROUP BY UserID

For your second query, yes you can use subqueries. And I think you don't need to aggregate:

SELECT * 
FROM (        
    SELECT Date, UserID 
    FROM MyTable
    ORDER BY Date dESC
)
WHERE ROWNUM < 2;

Note that you need to put the ORDER BY in the inner query and then filter with ROWUM in the outer query. Otherwise what you are doing is SELECTing the first retrieved row (whichever that may be) and then ORDERing that single row. Note also that ROWNUM will in general not work as you expect unless you restrict filtering to less-than (<)

share|improve this answer

I think you can do it without subquery:

SELECT MAX(Date) AS upd_dt,
       MAX(UserID) keep(dense_rank last order by Date) as UserID
  FROM MyTable;

To clarify this part: MAX(UserID). Consider having two rows with the same max Date and different UserID.

--------------------------
|MyTable                 |
--------------------------
|UserID      Date        |
--------------------------
|1          |6/13/2013   |
|2          |6/13/2013   |
--------------------------

So you have to decide which one to pick. With that aggregate MAX(UserID) or maybe MIN(UserID) you can vary the result.

share|improve this answer

Do you even need aggrigation for that? Just order by date desc and select top userid

select * from (select upd_dt, UserID from MyTable order by upd_dt desc) where rownum < 2
share|improve this answer
    
rownum is assigned before ordering, so there have to be subquery. –  Yaroslav Shabalin Dec 18 '13 at 21:29

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