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I use the following as a getter for a property in one of my classes:

- (NSString *)version
{
    if (_version == nil) {
        _version = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] infoDictionary] objectForKey:@"CFBundleVersion"];
    }
    return _version;
}

This works well. However, when I try the same for an int property I obviously get an error since int are never nil. What is the best way around this?

- (int)numberOfDays
{
    if (_numberOfDays == nil) {
        // relatively memory intense calculation that works out numberOfDays:
        _numberOfDays = X;
    }    
    return _numberOfDays;
}
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Either use a value that you know cannot occur (maybe -1?), or more clearly, just have a BOOL field (e.g. _numberOfDaysComputed). –  Jeremy Roman Dec 18 '13 at 20:10
2  
dispatch_once(&token, ^{ hard_computation(); }); –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:10
    
@H2CO3: That should probably be an answer. –  Chuck Dec 18 '13 at 20:11
    
@Chuck Thanks, done. –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, using int is not recommended Objective-C if possible. If you need to use a primitive integer type, you should use NSInteger. The size of NSInteger is determined at compile time based on the architecture(s) being built for. int is a static size that will not widen for different architectures. It's OK to use it, just be aware.

Using NSInteger, you still face the same problem, it can't be nil. You should therefore make your property an NSNumber which you can init with the result of your computation with [NSNumber numberWithInteger:anInteger];. That way, you can keep you nil check on your property and only do the computation once to create your NSNumber.

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Why should not be int used in Objective-C? –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:19
1  
I just explained that. see this answer stackoverflow.com/questions/4445173/… –  Patrick Goley Dec 18 '13 at 20:20
    
"It has a different size on different architectures" is not an explanation, since that's true for int as well. Also, the answer you linked to is disagreed with by quite a few people. –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:26
1  
@H2CO3, just as a note: int does not change size on any of the platforms we're talking about. It's always 32-bit. It could be different, but it never is within the Apple world, and it almost certainly never will be. –  Rob Napier Dec 18 '13 at 20:35
1  
@RobNapier iOS is not the only OS in the world ;-) Also, this: "int is a static size that will not optimize for different architectures." - is specifically incorrect. If we are splitting hair, let's do it correctly: in C, int is supposed/advised to be the fastest integer type. So if we are doing such optimization (why?), then it's even better to use. Now of course, ranges may be a real problem. And indeed, if there's an application that relies on an integer type being as wide as possible, then that should be NSInteger -- but else, that typedef hasn't any other real advantage. –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:38

Add another boolean instance variable _numberOfDaysCalculated. A thread-safe version would be

- (int)numberOfDays
{
    @synchronized(self) {
        if (!_numberOfDaysCalculated) {
            // relatively memory intense calculation that works out numberOfDays:
            _numberOfDays = X;
            _numberOfDaysCalculated = YES;
        }
    }    
    return _numberOfDays;
}

Alternatively, if there is some "invalid" value of the property, you can use that as a "not yet computed" marker. For example, if the computed value of numberOfDays has to be non-negative, you could initialize _numberOfDays = -1 in the init method, and then test for if (_numberOfDays == -1) in the lazy getter method.

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Ugh, so you added the "sentinel value out of range" method as well, I see :) –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:35

Use GCD.

static dispatch_once_t tok;
dispatch_once(&tok, ^{ memory_intensive_computation(); });

No, don't use GCD, I missed the point. In an instance method, you want to tie information to each instance, so using a static dispatch token is not appropriate. Maybe you should just stick with the "boolean flag as instance variable" approach.

Alternatively, you can initialize the int to a value which is known to be out of its valid range (for example, I suppose that numberOfDays can never be negative) and use that as a condition for performing the calculation.

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2  
- (int)numberOfDays is an instance method, and each instance has its own _version. So you cannot use a static dispatch_once_t. And using dispatch_once_t predicate as a member variable seems not to be allowed, compare stackoverflow.com/questions/13856037/…. –  Martin R Dec 18 '13 at 20:15
    
@MartinR Huh, I missed that. Surely you're right, let me think about this a bit more. –  user529758 Dec 18 '13 at 20:18
    
@MartinR: Yowza, I didn't know about the dynamic storage restriction either. What a bother. I wonder what that's all about. –  Chuck Dec 18 '13 at 20:19
    
It's because they use the actual memory location as the "I've done this" token. It needs to be something that can never change. –  Rob Napier Dec 18 '13 at 20:20
2  
As far as I know, Greg Parker is from Apple, and he posted this answer stackoverflow.com/a/19845164/1187415 to the above thread. –  Martin R Dec 18 '13 at 20:25

Use a NSNumber to store the int value.

- (int)numberOfDays
{
    if (_numberOfDays == nil) {
        // relatively memory intense calculation that works out numberOfDays:
        _numberOfDays = @(X);
    }    
    return [_numberOfDays intValue];
}
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IMO, the NSNumber solution is by far the best approach offered here. It is simple, consistent, reliable, and fast. –  Rob Napier Dec 18 '13 at 20:38
    
Would this involve the property being an NSNumber rather than an int? –  Charlie Seligman Dec 18 '13 at 21:38
    
@CharlieSeligman: The instance variable _numberOfDays would be an NSNumber. The property numberOfDays is still an int. –  Martin R Dec 18 '13 at 21:42
    
Ah ok - thanks Martin –  Charlie Seligman Dec 18 '13 at 21:45

I would initialize the _numberOfDays in the -init with NSNotFound and test for that in the getter.

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