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I am trying to use the answer of a preceding question to implement a small graph library. The idea is to consider graphs as colections, where vertices wrap collection elements.

I would like to use abstract types to represent Vertex and Edge types (because of type safety) and I want to use type parameters to represent the type of the collection elements (because I want to define them at instantiation easily).

However, when trying the most basic example I can think about, I am stuck with compile errors. Here is the example:

package graph

abstract class GraphKind[T] {

  type V <: Vertex[T]
  type G <: Graph[T]

  def newGraph(): G

  abstract class Graph[T] extends Collection[T]{
    self: G =>
    def vertices(): List[V]
    def add(t: T): Unit
    def size(): Int
    def elements(): Iterator[T]
  }

  trait Vertex[T] {
    self: V =>
      def graph(): G
      def value(): T
  }

}

And here is the basic implementations:

class SimpleGraphKind[T] extends GraphKind[T] {

  type G = GraphImpl[T]
  type V = VertexImpl[T]

  def newGraph() = new GraphImpl[T]

  class GraphImpl[T] extends Graph[T] {
    private var vertices_ = List[V]()
    def vertices = vertices_
    def add( t: T ) {  vertices_ ::= new VertexImpl[T](t,this) }
    def size() = vertices_.size
    def elements() = vertices.map( _.value ).elements
  }

  class VertexImpl[T](val value: T, val graph: GraphImpl[T]) extends Vertex[T] {
    override lazy val toString = "Vertex(" + value.toString + ")"
  }

}

When trying to compile, I get:

/prg/ScalaGraph/study/Graph.scala:10: error: illegal inheritance;
 self-type GraphKind.this.G does not conform to Collection[T]'s selftype Collection[T]
  abstract class Graph[T] extends Collection[T]{
                              ^
/prg/ScalaGraph/study/Graph.scala:33: error: illegal inheritance;
 self-type SimpleGraphKind.this.GraphImpl[T] does not conform to   SimpleGraphKind.this.Graph[T]'s selftype SimpleGraphKind.this.G
  class GraphImpl[T] extends Graph[T] {
                         ^
/prg/ScalaGraph/study/Graph.scala:36: error: type mismatch;
 found   : SimpleGraphKind.this.VertexImpl[T]
 required: SimpleGraphKind.this.V
    def add( t: T ) {  vertices_ ::= new VertexImpl[T](t,this) }
                                 ^
/prg/ScalaGraph/study/Graph.scala:38: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Iterator[T(in class SimpleGraphKind)]
 required: Iterator[T(in class GraphImpl)]
    def elements() = vertices.map( _.value ).elements
                                         ^
/prg/ScalaGraph/study/Graph.scala:41: error: illegal inheritance;
 self-type SimpleGraphKind.this.VertexImpl[T] does not conform to   SimpleGraphKind.this.Vertex[T]'s selftype SimpleGraphKind.this.V
  class VertexImpl[T](val value: T, val graph: GraphImpl[T]) extends Vertex[T] {
                                                                 ^
5 errors found

I have absolutely no idea of the meaning of these errors... However, if I specialize the type T in the implementation (class SimpleGraphKind extends GraphKind[Int] I get only the first error.

Do you have some ideas ?

share|improve this question
    
Could you clarify why you want a graph to be a collection? –  Randall Schulz Jan 14 '10 at 19:42
    
One application of this library would be to implement a kind of cellular automata on a graph (the other one is complex networks research). It could then be nice to access directly the Cell objects enclosed in the vertices... But if you have an idea of solution without the graph as collection feature, I am interested too. –  paradigmatic Jan 14 '10 at 20:00
    
I'm still not sure I see the connection. How would you see your graph library being distinguished from, say, JGraphT? Is it a functional approach to graphs? –  Randall Schulz Jan 14 '10 at 20:53
    
JGraphT (or Jung) do not bound vertex and edge types. So you must rely on the graph object to perform graph operations. In contrast, I find more natural of manipulating edge and vertex object directly (for instance I prefer vertex1.connectTo(vertex2) or vertex1 -> vertex2 rather than graph.connect( vertex1, vertex2). Vertex can either contain the logic or just be proxy to the graph object, depending of the implementation. –  paradigmatic Jan 14 '10 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Compiling this with -explaintypes yields:

<console>:11: error: illegal inheritance;
 self-type GraphKind.this.G does not conform to Collection[T]'s selftype Collection[T]
         abstract class Graph[T] extends Collection[T]{
                                         ^
    GraphKind.this.G <: Collection[T]?
      Iterable[T] <: Iterable[T]?
        T <: T?
          T <: Nothing?
            <notype> <: Nothing?
            false
            Any <: Nothing?
              <notype> <: Nothing?
              false
            false
          false
          Any <: T?
            Any <: Nothing?
              <notype> <: Nothing?
              false
            false
          false
        false
      false
      GraphKind.this.Graph[T] <: Iterable[T]?
        Iterable[T] <: Iterable[T]?
          T <: T?
            T <: Nothing?
              <notype> <: Nothing?
              false
              Any <: Nothing?
                <notype> <: Nothing?
                false
              false
            false
            Any <: T?
              Any <: Nothing?
                <notype> <: Nothing?
                false
              false
            false
          false
        false
      false
    false

Now, I was about to write I don't understand how T <: T can be false -- it is almost like T was defined twice, which, of course, is the whole problem. Here:

abstract class GraphKind[T] { 

  type V <: Vertex[T] 
  type G <: Graph[T] 

  def newGraph(): G 

  abstract class Graph[T] extends Collection[T]{ 

Ok, class GraphKind is parameterized with T and type G must be a Graph[T]. Now, class Graph is also parameterized, and its parameter is also called T. To prevent confusing, let's rewrite it:

  abstract class Graph[T2] extends Collection[T2]{
    self: G =>
    def vertices(): List[V]
    def add(t: T2): Unit
    def size(): Int
    def elements(): Iterator[T2]
  }

Note that this is EXACTLY EQUAL to what you wrote. I'm just using a different name for the type parameter, so that it doesn't get confused with the T that is parameterizing GraphKind.

So, here is the logic:

G <: Graph[T]
Graph[T2] <: Collection[T2]
Graph[T2] <: G  // self type

which implies that

Graph[T2] <: Graph[T]

And, because Graph extends Collection:

Collection[T2] <: Collection[T]

But there is no guarantee that this is true. I do not understand why the problem does not show up when the inheritance is not present. Fix:

abstract class GraphKind[T] {

  type V <: Vertex
  type G <: Graph

  def newGraph(): G

  abstract class Graph extends Collection[T]{
    self: G =>
    def vertices(): List[V]
    def add(t: T): Unit
    def size(): Int
    def elements(): Iterator[T]
  }

  trait Vertex {
    self: V =>
      def graph(): G
      def value(): T
  }

}

class SimpleGraphKind[T] extends GraphKind[T] {

  type G = GraphImpl
  type V = VertexImpl

  def newGraph() = new GraphImpl

  class GraphImpl extends Graph {
    private var vertices_ = List[V]()
    def vertices = vertices_
    def add( t: T ) {  vertices_ ::= new VertexImpl(t,this) }
    override def size() = vertices_.size
    override def elements() = vertices.map( _.value ).elements
  }

  class VertexImpl(val value: T, val graph: GraphImpl) extends Vertex {
    override lazy val toString = "Vertex(" + value.toString + ")"
  }
}

Since Vertex and Graph will be tied to one instance of GraphKind, then T will be fixed to whatever it was defined for that instance. For example:

scala> new SimpleGraphKind[Int]
res0: SimpleGraphKind[Int] = SimpleGraphKind@1dd0fe7

scala> new res0.GraphImpl
res1: res0.GraphImpl = line10()

scala> res1.add(10)

scala> res1.add("abc")
<console>:9: error: type mismatch;
 found   : java.lang.String("abc")
 required: Int
       res1.add("abc")
                ^
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I must confess I am ashamed because I did a similar mistake when learning generics in java 5 years ago... –  paradigmatic Jan 15 '10 at 6:59
1  
No need to be ashamed. I do it too, and then hate myself for doing it. It's not that I don't know how it works, it's just that it is natural to write D[T] extends C[T]. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 15 '10 at 17:51
    
On the other hand, -explaintypes is your friend. It takes a while to get used to it, particularly since the types get switched when they jump from a co-variant to a contra-variant position. However, there's nothing like it for complex type errors. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 17 '10 at 16:11

It seems that Vertex's belonging to a particular graph and only that graph can be represented best in the type system with a nested Vertex trait in the Graph. Is what you are trying to achieve met with the following structure?

abstract class Graph[T] extends Collection[T] {
  thisGraph: Graph[T] =>

  def newGraph: Graph[T] 
  def vertices: List[Vertex[T]]
  def add(t: T): Unit
  def size: Int
  def elements: Iterator[T]

  trait Vertex[T] {
      def graph = thisGraph
      def value: T
  }
}

class SimpleGraph[T] extends Graph[T] {
  private[this] var verts = List[Vertex[T]]()

  def newGraph = new SimpleGraph[T]
  def vertices = verts
  def add(t: T) { verts ::= SimpleVertex(t) }
  override def size = verts.size
  override def elements = verts.map(_.value).elements
  def iterator = elements // the "new" elements in 2.8

  case class SimpleVertex[T](value: T) extends Vertex[T]
}
share|improve this answer

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