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How do I determine a mapped drive's actual path?

So if I have a mapped drive on a machine called "Z" how can I using .NET determine the machine and path for the mapped folder?

The code can assume it's running on the machine with the mapped drive.

I looked at Path, Directory, FileInfo objects, but can't seem to find anything.

I also looked for existing questions, but could not find what I'm looking for.

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Check out @Nick's answer for a method that doesn't use pinvoke or any special libraries. –  tehDorf Jun 5 '13 at 15:39

10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here are some code samples:

All of the magic derives from a Windows function:

    [DllImport("mpr.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
    public static extern int WNetGetConnection(
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPTStr)] string localName, 
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPTStr)] StringBuilder remoteName, 
        ref int length);
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I have confirmed the C# code from the link works. I would rather have a non-dll import version, but better than nothing at all. –  eschneider Jan 15 '10 at 21:40
    
Rather than just providing a link, can you please provide some context in your actual answer in case the link becomes unavailable? Thanks. –  Deanna Mar 13 '13 at 16:42
    
In case that link is invalid some day, the main thing you need to know is that it uses WNetGetConnection (you can find that on MSDN). –  eselk Sep 4 '13 at 19:19

Expanding on ibram's answer here is the class I ended up using. If given a non-network drive path; it should just return it.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Management;    // System.Management.dll

    public class MappedDriveResolver {

        /// <summary>Resolves the given path to a full UNC path, or full local drive path.</summary>
        /// <param name="pPath"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public string ResolveToUNC(string pPath) {
            if (pPath.StartsWith(@"\\")) { return pPath; }

            string root = ResolveToRootUNC(pPath);

            if (pPath.StartsWith(root)) {
                return pPath; // Local drive, no resolving occurred
            } else {
                return pPath.Replace(GetDriveLetter(pPath), root);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>Resolves the given path to a root UNC path, or root local drive path.</summary>
        /// <param name="pPath"></param>
        /// <returns>\\server\share OR C:\</returns>
        public string ResolveToRootUNC(string pPath) {
            ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject();

            if (pPath.StartsWith(@"\\")) { return Directory.GetDirectoryRoot(pPath); }

            // Get just the drive letter for WMI call
            string driveletter = GetDriveLetter(pPath);

            mo.Path = new ManagementPath(string.Format("Win32_LogicalDisk='{0}'", driveletter));

            // Get the data we need
            uint DriveType = Convert.ToUInt32(mo["DriveType"]);
            string NetworkRoot = Convert.ToString(mo["ProviderName"]);
            mo = null;

            // Return the root UNC path if network drive, otherwise return the root path to the local drive
            if (DriveType == 4) {
                return NetworkRoot;
            } else {
                return driveletter + Path.DirectorySeparatorChar;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>Checks if the given path is on a network drive.</summary>
        /// <param name="pPath"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        public bool isNetworkDrive(string pPath) {
            ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject();

            if (pPath.StartsWith(@"\\")) { return true; }

            // Get just the drive letter for WMI call
            string driveletter = GetDriveLetter(pPath);

            mo.Path = new ManagementPath(string.Format("Win32_LogicalDisk='{0}'", driveletter));

            // Get the data we need
            uint DriveType = Convert.ToUInt32(mo["DriveType"]);
            mo = null;

            return DriveType == 4;
        }

        /// <summary>Given a path will extract just the drive letter with volume separator.</summary>
        /// <param name="pPath"></param>
        /// <returns>C:</returns>
        public string GetDriveLetter(string pPath) {
            if (pPath.StartsWith(@"\\")) { throw new ArgumentException("A UNC path was passed to GetDriveLetter"); }
            return Directory.GetDirectoryRoot(pPath).Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar.ToString(), "");
        }

    }
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1  
neat bit of code +1 –  deltree Mar 20 '12 at 23:26
1  
Convert.ToUInt32(mo["DriveType"]) causes a The type initializer for 'System.Management.ManagementPath' threw an exception, do you know if this code works on Windows7 or could it be Group Policy? –  Jeremy Thompson Jun 4 '13 at 5:52
    
@JeremyThompson The InnerException for this exception (which I am also getting) is [System.Threading.ThreadAbortException] {"Exception of type 'System.Threading.ThreadAbortException' was thrown."}. I do not know the cause of this yet, but am still looking for a solution. I'm running Win7 x64. –  Hydronium Jul 10 '13 at 20:14
    
+1; I ended using this code with some small changes: 1. Made the class and methods static; 2. mo["DriveType"] can be casted directly to uint and then to System.IO.DriveType. This way I don't have to deal with those magic numbers. 3. Put mo in an using statement. mo = null doesn't really help the GC –  Kabbalah Mar 20 at 10:56

I can't remember where I found this, but it works without p/invoke. It's what rerun posted before.

you need to reference System.Management.dll:

using System.IO;
using System.Management;

code:

        public void FindUNCPaths()
        {
            DriveInfo[] dis = DriveInfo.GetDrives();
            foreach ( DriveInfo di in dis )
            {
                if ( di.DriveType == DriveType.Network )
                {
                    DirectoryInfo dir = di.RootDirectory;
                    // "x:"
                    MessageBox.Show( GetUNCPath( dir.FullName.Substring( 0, 2 ) ) );
                }
            }
        }

        public string GetUNCPath( string path )
        {
            if ( path.StartsWith( @"\\" ) ) return path;

            ManagementObject mo = new ManagementObject();
            mo.Path = new ManagementPath( string.Format( "Win32_LogicalDisk='{0}'", path ) );

            //DriveType 4 = Network Drive
            if ( Convert.ToUInt32( mo["DriveType"] ) == 4 ) return Convert.ToString( mo["ProviderName"] );
            else return path;
        }
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This worked perfectly for my needs and seems to be the simplest solution. I'm surprised I haven't seen this anywhere else. –  JimDel Jan 11 '12 at 1:17

QueryDosDevice translates a drive letter into the path that it expands to.

Note that this will translate ALL drive letters, not just those that are mapped to network connections. You need to already know which are network paths, or to parse the output to see which are network.

Here's the VB signature

Declare Function QueryDosDevice Lib "kernel32" Alias "QueryDosDeviceA" (
       ByVal lpDeviceName    As String, 
       ByVal lpTargetPath As String, 
       ByVal ucchMax As Integer) As Integer 

And the C# one

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
static extern uint QueryDosDevice(string lpDeviceName, IntPtr lpTargetPath, uint ucchMax);
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I can't get this to work, also this look like it will not give the folder, mapped driver are to a server and a folder... –  eschneider Jan 15 '10 at 21:37
    
If you mean you want to know that path as it appears to the server, then you will need to ask the server. That information isn't available to the client. –  John Knoeller Jan 15 '10 at 21:39
    
If the drive is mapped on the machine the code is running on then it should work. –  eschneider Jan 15 '10 at 21:46
    
You will get back \\server\share on the machine that the drive is mapped on. The server may have share aliased to c:\foo\bar\whatever, If you want that then you have to ask the server. –  John Knoeller Jan 15 '10 at 21:51

Seems it's need a P/Invoke: Converting a mapped drive letter to a network path using C#

This guy built a managed class to deal with it: C# Map Network Drive (API)

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1  
Looks like this allows you to map or un-map drives via code, I don't see anything on obtaining a path from a mapped path. –  eschneider Jan 15 '10 at 21:43

You can also use WMI Win32_LogicalDisk to get all the information you need. use the ProviderName from the class to get the UNC path.

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I think you can use the "Network" key From the "Current User" Hive, In the Registry. The Mapped Drives Are Listed There With Their Shared Path On Server.

If there is no mapped drive in the system, so there is no "Network" Key In The "Current User" Hive.

Now, I'm using this way, no external dll nor anything else.

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You can use WMI to interrogate the Win32_LogicalDrive collection on your machine. Here is an example of how to do it with scripting. Changing this over to C# is pretty well explained in other places.

Slightly modified VB.NET code from the article:

Public Class Form1

    Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
        Dim strComputer = "."

        Dim objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:\\" & strComputer & "\root\cimv2")

        Dim colDrives = objWMIService.ExecQuery("Select * From Win32_LogicalDisk Where DriveType = 4")

        For Each objDrive In colDrives
            Debug.WriteLine("Drive letter: " & objDrive.DeviceID)
            Debug.WriteLine("Network path: " & objDrive.ProviderName)
        Next
    End Sub

End Class
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Dead simple way of getting the network share of each mapped drive without using any special libraries. This works straight out of the box in a VS Express 2012 for Desktop Windows Form application. –  tehDorf Jun 5 '13 at 15:32

As far as Windows cares, what's needed is a call to WNetGetConnection. I don't know of a front-end for that in .NET, so you may have to call it via P/Invoke (fortunately, it has only one parameter, the P/Invoke code isn't too awful).

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I could not replicate ibram's or Vermis' answer due to the problem I mentioned in a comment under Vermis' answer, about a type initializer exception.

Instead, I discovered I could query for all the drives currently on the computer and then loop through them, like so:

using System.IO; //For DirectoryNotFound exception.
using System.Management;


/// <summary>
/// Given a local mapped drive letter, determine if it is a network drive. If so, return the server share.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="mappedDrive"></param>
/// <returns>The server path that the drive maps to ~ "////XXXXXX//ZZZZ"</returns>
private string CheckUNCPath(string mappedDrive)
{
    //Query to return all the local computer's drives.
    //See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186146.aspx, or search "WMI Queries"
    SelectQuery selectWMIQuery = new SelectQuery("Win32_LogicalDisk");
    ManagementObjectSearcher driveSearcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(selectWMIQuery);

    //Soem variables to be used inside and out of the foreach.
    ManagementPath path = null;
    ManagementObject networkDrive = null;
    bool found = false;
    string serverName = null;

    //Check each disk, determine if it is a network drive, and then return the real server path.
    foreach (ManagementObject disk in driveSearcher.Get())
    {
        path = disk.Path;

        if (path.ToString().Contains(mappedDrive))
        {
            networkDrive = new ManagementObject(path);

            if (Convert.ToUInt32(networkDrive["DriveType"]) == 4)
            {
                serverName = Convert.ToString(networkDrive["ProviderName"]);
                found = true;
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new DirectoryNotFoundException("The drive " + mappedDrive + " was found, but is not a network drive. Were your network drives mapped correctly?");
            }
        }
    }

    if (!found)
    {
        throw new DirectoryNotFoundException("The drive " + mappedDrive + " was not found. Were your network drives mapped correctly?");
    }
    else
    {
        return serverName;
    }
}

This works for x64 Windows 7, for .NET 4. It should be usable in case you're getting that exception that was mentioned above.

I did this using the stuff given from MSDN and bits from ibram's or Vermis' answers, though it was a bit difficult to find specific examples on the MSDN. Resources used:

MSDN : Win32_LogicalDisk Class

MSDN : System.Management namespace

MSDN : WMI Queries example:

using System;
using System.Management;
class Query_SelectQuery
{
    public static int Main(string[] args) 
    {
        SelectQuery selectQuery = new 
            SelectQuery("Win32_LogicalDisk");
        ManagementObjectSearcher searcher =
            new ManagementObjectSearcher(selectQuery);

        foreach (ManagementObject disk in searcher.Get()) 
        {
            Console.WriteLine(disk.ToString());
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
        return 0;
    }
}
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