Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just learned a painful lesson about the use of static properties in classes. Mainly that they are not browser session specific when they are not part of the aspx page loaded. (Please correct me anywhere I am wrong as I don't have formal education in programming)

I have since been using Session objects.

The main thing that I hate about Session objects is that they are subject to typos because they are unknown to intellisense.

You can't just type the namespace.class.class.setgetproperty and know that you are referencing the correct session object like you can with class properties.

Is there a way to mix class and session objects together so when I call on a session object I can utilize intellisense?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a wrapper class, that wraps the Session object. Ultimately, you still have to use a key/value system still, though.

public class MySessionWrapper
{
   public string MySessionProperty 
   {
      get
      { 
          return Session["myProperty"] == null ? null : (string) Session["myProperty"]; 
      }
      set
      { 
          Session.Add("myProperty", value);
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach. I would not have thought of that. If the property is in class file and referenced from say the code behind an aspx page will there be any issues with other browser sessions accessing the same session object or will they be browser specific? –  user3071434 Dec 19 '13 at 0:06
    
Yes, it will be fine, since you are still ultimately accessing the session object. –  Cam Bruce Dec 19 '13 at 0:09
    
I was at the Visual Studio Live 360 conference in FL last month and I do recall one of the speakers ....... i think it was in the "how to be a c# ninja" session saying that ternary operators should be avoided. I don't recall the reasons. I do however use them, and wondered what your thoughts were? Thanks for your time and insight. –  user3071434 Dec 19 '13 at 0:13
    
Oh, do i have to instantiate the class? –  user3071434 Dec 19 '13 at 0:18
    
No, it can be a static class. I don't don't think ternary operations are bad. They are good space savers for a simple null reference check or something similar. If your condition is more complex, i'd go to an if/else statement. –  Cam Bruce Dec 19 '13 at 0:21

You could wrap it inside of methods. As an example, say we were storing a User object. Something like this:

public void SetUser(User user)
{
    Session.Add("User", user);
}

public User GetUser()
{
     User user = (User)Session["User"];

     return user;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is also an interesting approach. Thanks for your reply. –  user3071434 Dec 19 '13 at 0:20

I think that I have optimized the code. Let me know if anyone sees anything that could be a issue. So far I have seen no problems.

public Users.CurrentUser GetSetCurrentUser
{
    get
    {
        if (Session["cUser"] == null) GetSetCurrentUser = new Users.CurrentUser();
        return (Users.cUser)Session["CurrentUser"];
    }
    set { Session.Add("cUser", value); }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.