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EDIT: This is not a question about whether it's OK to use a GoTo statement.

It is a question about how to handle the center of an O(n^3) algorithm in .NET/IL without using a GoTo statement. Adherents and fellow travelers of Dijkstra's philosophies, please take note before failing to read the question.

Consider the following code, in which for most use cases the contents of the For o = 0 to nz loop will be executed between 3 million and 18 million times. The subroutine takes its place in my code as an argument for a Parallel.For() call. The domain of m, ny, and nz are all between 10 and 300.

It is hand-optimized to avoid stack pushes and subroutine calls, in other words, for speed. My desire is to avoid a compilation to IL which includes a calli or call opcode inside the innermost loop.

To abort the innermost three loops once a test is satisfied, I use a GoTo statement to abort unneeded tests.

The question is, is there a way to code this without the GoTo? Is there a way to code this which the .net JIT-Compiler will compile to faster code without call or calli opcodes ending up in the object code?

Sub SomeLambda(m As Integer, newarray As Short(,,))
    For n = 0 To ny
        For o = 0 To nz
            If newarray(m, n, o) <> 1 AndAlso newarray(m, n, o) <> -1 Then
                For m1 = m - 1 To m + 1
                    For n1 = n - 1 To n + 1
                        For o1 = o - 1 To o + 1
                            If SomeCondition = True Then 'the array is not out of bounds '
                                Dim testVal = newarray(m1, n1, o1)
                                If testVal = -1 Then
                                    newarray(m, n, o) = -2
                                    GoTo Exitloopslabel2
                                End If
                            End If
                        Next
                    Next
                Next
   Exitloopslabel2: 
            End If
        Next
    Next
End Sub
share|improve this question
    
Most people would say that you should refactor nested loops to avoid goto, but if you have reason to believe that subroutine calls would be too expensive (i.e., you've measured it), then this really is the only solution. –  siride Dec 19 '13 at 0:48
    
Not a duplicate: the other question suggests a solution which forms the code sample of my question. It would be nice if someone would post an answer I can upvote and approve, rather than just a comment. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 1:02
    
@RobPerkins: I wonder if this is a better question for programmers.stackexchange.com? I don't like the balkanization of the SE sites, but it is what it is. –  siride Dec 19 '13 at 1:04
    
It is not a duplicate of any other "Is GoTo OK" question. Of course it's OK to use GoTo here; it works. It's not appropriate for Programmers-SE, because it is a question specifically sited in the context of the .NET Framework, HPC computing, and the VB.Net language, asking whether or not a better form of the algorithm exists. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 1:12
    
Having said that, though, please leave the "possible duplicate" flags in place if that will help other users find the answers to those questions. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 1:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is there any reason not to push it out to a seperate method and then decorate that method with MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining ("The method should be inlined if possible").

This would let you use Return and tidy up your code considerably while also skipping the stack pushes, jumps, etc.

Unfortunately, with the constraints you've imposed, there aren't many alternatives.

As requested, some example usage in VB.Net:

<MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)>
Public Function Blah() As String 
    ...
End Function

and C#

[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)] 
public static string Blah() {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Basic, the only reason I can think of is that I didn't know about MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining. I will try this! –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 1:57
    
Would you be willing to edit your answer to include a C# or VB.Net function header with the appropriate decoration? –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 2:01
    
@RobPerkins A little late for the examples but I hope that helps. –  Basic Dec 19 '13 at 8:28
    
It worked! Timing tests now vary between the GoTo variant and one with separated methods, sometimes the one faster, sometimes the other. That suggests to me that the compiler is doing at least as good a job as the hand optimization, with the variances in timing explained elsewhere. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 20:45
    
Nice! Always satisfying when you get wins like that. Glad I could help - see you around. –  Basic Dec 19 '13 at 22:19

Although i would suggest you to use separated method to do the loop, if you are really keen to use nested loop, there is an alternative to jump out from the loop you like:

    Dim list1 = Enumerable.Range(1, 10)
    Dim list2 = Enumerable.Range(101, 10)
    Dim list3 = Enumerable.Range(201, 10)

    Console.WriteLine("Loop Start")

    For i As Integer = 0 To list1.Count - 1
        For j As Integer = 0 To list2.Count - 1
            For k As Integer = 0 To list3.Count - 1
                Console.WriteLine(k)
                If list3(k) = 205 Then ' Assume this is the condition to exit
                    k = list3.Count ' -- exit the loop of list3
                    j = list2.Count ' -- exit the loop of list2
                End If
            Next
        Next
    Next

    Console.WriteLine("Finished")

I wrote a simpler sample (other than using your complex one), this would work with nested loops (regardless number of loops). and I believe the overhead would be minimal.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks even uglier than the GoTo, I think. –  svick Dec 19 '13 at 2:05
    
exactly, that's why I would say using separated method is better. –  Rex Dec 19 '13 at 2:06

Simple - rewrite this piece For m1 = m - 1 To m + 1 as a While loop. Then do Exit While. You can handle multiple GoTo's like that, since there is also a Do loop with its own Exit Do. More about Exit Statement on MSDN.

Although, my preferred solution is to refactor it like this:

Sub SomeLambda(m As Integer, newarray As Short(,,))
  For n = 0 To ny
    For o = 0 To nz
      If newarray(m, n, o) = 1 OrElse newarray(m, n, o) = -1 Then Continue For
      DoSomething(m, n, o, newarray)
    Next
  Next
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomething(m, n, o, newarray)
  For m1 = m - 1 To m + 1
    For n1 = n - 1 To n + 1
      For o1 = o - 1 To o + 1
        If Not SomeCondition() = True Then Continue For 'the array is not out of bounds 
        Dim testVal = newarray(m1, n1, o1)
        If testVal <> -1 Then Continue For
        newarray(m, n, o) = -2
        Return
      Next
    Next
  Next
End Sub

Make sure it does not hurt performance though, and always use Option Strict On. The above would obviously not compile with it - just to show the concept.

Notice I removed unnecessary indentation, so the code became more flat and hopefully more readable.

EDIT: As a compromise between performance and maintainability, you could use class-level variables. So yes, you still jump to DoSomething and back, but no stack pushes.

share|improve this answer

My desire is to avoid a compilation to IL which includes a calli or call opcode inside the innermost loop.

You shouldn't care much about what IL is generated by your code, the only thing that metters for performance is the machine code (usually x86).

So, what you should do is to write your code in a readable way (using another function with Return for the inner loop) and then measure the performance to see whether it made a difference or not.

As an alternative, you could look at the compiled machine code to see whether the inner loop method was inlined or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, as a 20-year veteran of software development in general, I'm not ignorant of this methodology, since it's what I used, complete with the RedGate profiler, to arrive at the function I have. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 2:02
    
@RobPerkins So you're saying that you measured both versions, and the one with another method was actually slower? Because I didn't notice you mention that anywhere and I think that's an important piece of information. –  svick Dec 19 '13 at 2:03
    
I've been profiling this code all day. –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 2:08
1  
@RobPerkins So why don't you share the relevant results with us? –  svick Dec 19 '13 at 2:08
    
Because it wasn't germane to the question, which is related to removing a GoTo statement without ending up with calli or call in the resultant IL. It stands to reason that if the IL doesn't get those opcoded, then the jitted x64 won't have call in it either. The algorithm is O(n^3 + 9n) after all... –  Rob Perkins Dec 19 '13 at 2:11

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