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I have the following in my .emacs:

  (set-face-font 'default "-*-Interface User-Medium-R-*-*-13-120-*-*-*-*-*-*")
  ;; Set default height/width
  (add-to-list 'default-frame-alist '(width . 180))
  (add-to-list 'default-frame-alist '(height . 70))
  (if (file-exists-p "./headers") (find-file "./headers"))
  ;; Split window
  (split-window-horizontally)
  (if (file-exists-p "../source") (find-file "../source"))

Using emacs 23 the folders are viewed side by side left justified. However,when running on emacs 24 the folders are right justified and I need to add:

(beginning-of-line)

After each (if ....)

What is the reason for that?

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1  
FIND-FILE with a directory argument invokes Dired on the directory, but I don't know why your Dired buffers would be right-aligned. I assume by "right-aligned" you mean the lines are flush against the right-hand window border, rather than the left; I actually don't know any way to make a Dired buffer look like that, so I'm not sure I understand the question. Can you add to your question a screenshot of what you're seeing? –  Aaron Miller Dec 19 '13 at 2:30
    
Aaron, thanks for your response. The weird thing that if I did the steps "after" opening emacs then there will be no problem, meaning, if I opened emacs normally, find-file ./headers then split screen, find-file ./source, they wont be right justified. It is when I include these steps int he .emacs file things get whaky. here is a screenshot: imgur.com/LPGUkED –  SFbay007 Dec 20 '13 at 18:53
    
Wow, that is strange. Given your comment regarding timing, my immediate suspicion is that, based on where the relevant code happens to be in your .emacs, it's getting run before some other part of the initialization code which is critical to making dired buffers behave the way you expect. For cases like this, Emacs provides the after-init-hook, a list of functions to execute immediately after initialization completes; I'll post an answer with an example of how it might usefully be applied in your case. –  Aaron Miller Dec 20 '13 at 19:15
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1 Answer 1

Given your comment regarding timing, my immediate suspicion is that, based on where the relevant code happens to be in your .emacs, it's getting run before some other part of the initialization code which is critical to making dired buffers behave the way you expect. For cases like this, Emacs provides the after-init-hook, a list of functions to execute immediately after initialization completes. Here's how you might make use of it to ensure that the dired buffers aren't created until everything is initialized:

(add-hook 'after-init-hook
          ;; since this is the only place we'll use this code, there's no point
          ;; cluttering the namespace with a defun, hence wrapping it in a lambda
          #'(lambda ()
              ;; Create dired buffer on ./headers
              (if (file-exists-p "./headers") (find-file "./headers"))
              ;; Split window
              (split-window-horizontally)
              ;; Create dired buffer on ../source
              (if (file-exists-p "../source") (find-file "../source"))))

If you put this in place of the last four lines of the .emacs snippet in your question, it may solve the problem.

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Thanks for the help Aaron. Unfortunately, that did not help. I tried placing the code at the end of my .emacs file along with the after-init-hook. But I still see right justified Dired. –  SFbay007 Dec 20 '13 at 22:08
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