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Currently I'm calling a remote script using the backtick method, it works, but it feels wrong and nasty...

`ssh user@host $(echo "~/bin/command \\\"#{parameter}\\\"")`

Can someone give me a better way of expressing this?

Many thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would make it a little pretty, if that is what you are after:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
# encoding: utf-8

home    = "/path/to/users/home/on/remote"
binary  = File.join(home, "bin", "command")
command = "#{binary} '#{parameter}'"
puts `ssh user@host #{command}`

Otherwise, you can use the net-ssh library, and do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
# encoding: utf-8

require 'net/ssh'
Net::SSH.start('host', 'user', :password => "<your-password>") do
  home    = "/path/to/users/home/on/remote"
  binary  = File.join(home, "bin", "command")
  command = "#{binary} '#{parameter}'"
  output = ssh.exec!(command)
  puts output
end

There are, obviously, automated ways of capturing remote user's home directory path, but I skipped that part.

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Looks nicer indeed, using Net::SSH, I was wondering why you broke up the backticks style, instead of using system? - By the way, why not use ~ on remote? –  Slomojo Dec 19 '13 at 4:40
    
Reason for using explicit path over ~ is more based upon my personal convention. I prefer not to rely on automatic path detection, esp. if the server is windows based, and also, prefer to use absolute paths over relative ones. Moreover, File.expand_path("~") can not be used in this case, since it will expand to the local server's home instead of remote server's home. –  Stoic Dec 19 '13 at 21:04
    
thanks for the info, I assumed File would expand locally. What's a good method for getting the remote home folder? –  Slomojo Dec 19 '13 at 21:58

Use net-ssh. It's just a wrapper.

require 'net/ssh'

Net::SSH.start('host', 'user', :password => "password") do |ssh|
  # capture all stderr and stdout output from a remote process
  output = ssh.exec!("~/bin/command '#{parameter}'")
end

puts output
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@r3mus - suggesting to use net-ssh is hardly a comment. Although it's not a particularly verbose answer, it is an answer nonetheless. –  Slomojo Dec 19 '13 at 4:44
    
@Slomojo heh, well, it only said "Use net-ssh It's just a wrapper." at the time. –  remus Dec 19 '13 at 4:51
    
Hi @r3mus I know, I read the history, that's the context of my comment. Granted, I would've had to go read the docs, but they were linked. Nothing wrong with the answer, at least it was correct / valid. –  Slomojo Dec 19 '13 at 4:53

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