Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got a problem with void pointer in this program (I am sorry for having to bring up the whole bad program...).

#include "stdafx.h"
void Input_int(int& InputVar, int Min = -2147483647, int Max = 2147483647);
void Output_array(void* Array, unsigned int ElementNumber, unsigned int Type = 0);
//Type = 0 => int, 1 => bool.
bool* Convert_decimal_to_binary(int n);

void main()
{
    int n;
    bool* binary;
    Input_int(n, -255, 255);
    binary = Convert_decimal_to_binary(n);
    printf("Binary's address: %d\n", binary);
    Output_array(binary, 8, 1);
}

void Input_int(int& InputVar, int Min, int Max)
{
    do {
        printf("Please input an integer in range [%d;%d]: ", Min, Max);
        scanf_s("%u", &InputVar);
        if (InputVar > Max || InputVar < Min) printf("Your number is out of the range!\n");
    } while (InputVar > Max || InputVar < Min);
}

bool* Convert_decimal_to_binary(int n)
{
    static bool Array[8];
    bool finishplus = false;
    if (n < 0)
    {
        int i;
        for (i = 7; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            if (n % 2 == 0) Array[i] = 0;
            else {
                if (!finishplus)
                {
                    Array[i] = 0;
                    finishplus = true;
                }
                else
                    Array[i] = 1;
            }
            n = n / 2;
        }
    }
    else {
        for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
        {
            if (n % 2 == 0) Array[i] = 0;
            else Array[i] = 1;
            n = n / 2;
        }
    }
    return Array;
}
void Output_array(void* Array, unsigned int ElementNumber, unsigned int Type)
{
    if (Type == 0)
    {
        int* ArrayR;
        ArrayR = (int*)Array;
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ElementNumber; i++)
            printf("Element %d got value: %d\n", i, ArrayR[i]);
    }
    else if (Type == 1)
    {
        bool* ArrayR;
        printf("Array's address (in Output_array) before type explicited: %d\n", Array);
        ArrayR = (bool*)Array;
        printf("Array's address (in Output_array) after type explicited: %d", Array);
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < ElementNumber; i++)
            printf("%d", i, ArrayR[i]);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

The main problem here is at the outputs of these 3 lines:

printf("Binary's address: %d\n", binary);
printf("Array's address (in Output_array) before type explicited: %d\n", Array);
printf("Array's address (in Output_array) after type explicited: %d", Array);

Why the 3rd output is different from the others?

Example:

Binary's address: 11374900.
Array's address (in Output_array) before type explicited: 11374900.
Array's address (in Output_array) after type explicited: 1137490001234567.

there, "01234567" always appear.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by vitaut, Jayamohan, Jim Balter, karthik, Andrew Cheong Dec 19 '13 at 4:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – vitaut, Jayamohan, Jim Balter, karthik
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Please post a minimal test case. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 19 '13 at 3:39
    
What happens if you comment out the following: ArrayR = (bool*)Array; –  tier1 Dec 19 '13 at 3:45
    
Tagged C++ - Why printf etc? Also avoid void pointers as you lose type safety. –  Ed Heal Dec 19 '13 at 3:48
3  
You forgot the \n on the last printf so it's appending the next number you output. –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '13 at 3:52
    
@OliCharlesworth: I added an example, not sure if it is what you suggested? –  ntvy95 Dec 19 '13 at 3:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You forgot the \n on the last printf so it's appending the next number you output. The pointer itself is fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Sorry for being annoying.. –  ntvy95 Dec 19 '13 at 3:58
1  
@ntvy95, not annoying at all. It's easy to miss the simplest things. –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '13 at 3:59
    
It's also easy to look at one's program and notice the extremely obvious ... the program explicitly prints those numbers; they had to show up in the output somewhere. –  Jim Balter Dec 19 '13 at 4:53

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.