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Recently I am dealing with a 1GB json format's file, after using the fromJSON function to convert it to a list of length about 4 millions, I want to scrape one specific element of the list of list. My list looks like this (tweets.list is the name of my list, with the length of 4132406),

> tweets.list[[1]]

$`_id`
[1] "371045756826050561"

$text
[1] "RT @arabic_Leos: لو #الأسد في حالة إعجاب، تجده يتحدث عن الشخص طول الوقت، يفكر به ويكتب عنه يبحث عن صفحاته في النت ويدمن عليه، لذا احتمالية …"

$created_at
[1] "Fri Aug 23 23:06:16 +0000 2013"

Now I only want the "created_at" value in each one of the list, hence my code is as follows:

tweets.unlist<-unlist(tweets.list)

create.date<-0
for(i in 1:(length(tweets.unlist)/3)){
create.date[i]<-tweets.unlist[3*i]
}

I have already run this code around 24 hours and it seems endless, and I wonder if there is any faster and simple enough alternatives to do this? Since I also need to conduct some analysis after converting it to my desired format, I am looking forward to a universal solution, which not only enhance the converting speed, but also enhance the overall computing speed. Thank you all in advance!

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try lapply(tweets.list, '[[', 'created_at') –  Jake Burkhead Dec 19 '13 at 4:03
    
Wow that was a really unexpected method! Never knowing I can use lapply this way, I'll try it, thank you!!!! –  Yu Hua Cheng Dec 19 '13 at 5:49
    
And it costed me only about 10 seconds! That's amazing! Thank you again!!! –  Yu Hua Cheng Dec 19 '13 at 6:11
    
Another option, providied you want every third element is tweets.unlist[!seq(length(tweets.unlist))%%3] –  James Dec 19 '13 at 7:39
    
@YuHuaCheng glad that helped. I posted it as an answer with a little explanation and a benchmark –  Jake Burkhead Dec 19 '13 at 13:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a benchmark. The issue with your original implementation is that you are growing the create.date vector which R is really bad at. A simple change which will cut down the run time a lot is just to preallocate the vector before the for loop (ie instead of create.date <- 0 do create.date <- character(length(x))).

library(microbenchmark)

tweet <- list(id = 123456, text = "foo", created = as.character(Sys.time()))

tweets.list <- rep(list(tweet), 1e5)

for_growing <- function(x) {
    x.unlist <- unlist(x)

    create.date <- 0
    for (i in 1:(length(x) / 3)) {
        create.date[i] <- x.unlist[3*i]
    }

}

for_prealloc <- function(x) {
    x.unlist <- unlist(x)

    create.date <- character(length(x))
    for (i in 1:(length(x) / 3)) {
        create.date[i] <- x.unlist[3*i]
    }
}

lapply_jake <- function(x) {
    lapply(x, "[[", "created")
}

mod_james <- function(x) {
    x.unlist <- unlist(x)

    x.unlist[!seq(length(x.unlist)) %% 3]
}


microbenchmark(
    for_growing(tweets.list),
    for_prealloc(tweets.list),
    lapply_jake(tweets.list),
    mod_james(tweets.list),
    times = 10L
    )

## Unit: milliseconds
##                      expr        min         lq     median         uq
##  for_growing(tweets.list) 3167.38761 3174.06745 3238.12112 3330.79536
## for_prealloc(tweets.list)  395.30506  397.10530  400.93948  404.11285
##  lapply_jake(tweets.list)   63.57347   64.88034   65.50494   69.94222
##    mod_james(tweets.list)  325.38708  327.81474  334.16780  363.51899
##       max neval
## 3480.2019    10
##  433.8970    10
##  110.4278    10
##  370.6554    10
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, thank you, and thank you!! This really blows my mind! I do feel a huge mind step in this concept. Thank you Jake! –  Yu Hua Cheng Dec 19 '13 at 22:10

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