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I'm trying to process CQEngine's ResultSet using Scala's foreach, but the result is very slow.

Following is the snippet of what I'm trying to do

import collection.JavaConversions._
val query = existIn(myOtherCollection, REFERENCE, REFERENCE)
val resultSet = myIndexCollection.retrieve(query)
resultSet.foreach(r =>{
    //do something here
})

Somehow the .foreach method is very slow. I tried to debug by putting SimonMonitor and change the .foreach using while(resultSet.hasNext), surprisingly, every call to hasNext method takes about 1-2 seconds. That's very slow.

I tried to create the same version using Java, and the Java version is super fast.

Please help

share|improve this question
    
Can you post more code? I can't understand why using a direct hasNext which is implemented in Java would somehow be slower just because you're calling it from a Scala code base. There's got to be something more you're doing. – wheaties Dec 22 '13 at 18:34
    
@wheaties That's what I was thinking too, but I just couldn't find where my mistake is. I'll post more code when I get into office. – Wins Dec 23 '13 at 1:26
    
ok, ping me so I know to check this question – wheaties Dec 23 '13 at 1:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I am not able to reproduce your problem with the below test code. Can you try it on your system and let me know how it runs?

(Uncomment line 38, garages.addIndex(HashIndex.onAttribute(Garage.BRANDS_SERVICED)), to make BOTH the Scala and Java iterators run blazingly fast...)

The output first (time in milliseconds):

Done adding data
Done adding index
============== Scala ============== 
Car{carId=4, name='BMW M3', description='2013 model', features=[radio, convertible]}
Time : 3 seconds
Car{carId=1, name='Ford Focus', description='great condition, low mileage', features=[spare tyre, sunroof]}
Time : 1 seconds
Car{carId=2, name='Ford Taurus', description='dirty and unreliable, flat tyre', features=[spare tyre, radio]}
Time : 2 seconds
============== Java ============== 
Car{carId=4, name='BMW M3', description='2013 model', features=[radio, convertible]}
Time : 3 seconds
Car{carId=1, name='Ford Focus', description='great condition, low mileage', features=[spare tyre, sunroof]}
Time : 1 seconds
Car{carId=2, name='Ford Taurus', description='dirty and unreliable, flat tyre', features=[spare tyre, radio]}
Time : 2 seconds

Code below:

import collection.JavaConversions._
import com.googlecode.cqengine.query.QueryFactory._
import com.googlecode.cqengine.CQEngine;
import com.googlecode.cqengine.index.hash._;
import com.googlecode.cqengine.IndexedCollection;
import com.googlecode.cqengine.query.Query;
import java.util.Arrays.asList;

object CQTest {

  def main(args: Array[String]) {

    val cars: IndexedCollection[Car] = CQEngine.newInstance();
    cars.add(new Car(1, "Ford Focus", "great condition, low mileage", asList("spare tyre", "sunroof")));
    cars.add(new Car(2, "Ford Taurus", "dirty and unreliable, flat tyre", asList("spare tyre", "radio")));
    cars.add(new Car(3, "Honda Civic", "has a flat tyre and high mileage", asList("radio")));
    cars.add(new Car(4, "BMW M3", "2013 model", asList("radio", "convertible")));

    // add cruft to try and slow down CQE
    for (i <- 1 to 10000) {
      cars.add(new Car(i, "BMW2014_" + i, "2014 model", asList("radio", "convertible")))
    }

    // Create an indexed collection of garages...
    val garages: IndexedCollection[Garage] = CQEngine.newInstance();
    garages.add(new Garage(1, "Joe's garage", "London", asList("Ford Focus", "Honda Civic")));
    garages.add(new Garage(2, "Jane's garage", "Dublin", asList("BMW M3")));
    garages.add(new Garage(3, "John's garage", "Dublin", asList("Ford Focus", "Ford Taurus")));
    garages.add(new Garage(4, "Jill's garage", "Dublin", asList("Ford Focus")));

    // add cruft to try and slow down CQE
    for (i <- 1 to 10000) {
      garages.add(new Garage(i, "Jill's garage", "Dublin", asList("DONT_MATCH_CARS_BMW2014_" + i)))
    }

    println("Done adding data")
    // cars.addIndex(HashIndex.onAttribute(Car.NAME));
    // garages.addIndex(HashIndex.onAttribute(Garage.BRANDS_SERVICED));
    println("Done adding index")
    val query = existsIn(garages, Car.NAME, Garage.BRANDS_SERVICED, equal(Garage.LOCATION, "Dublin"))
    val resultSet = cars.retrieve(query)

    var previous = System.currentTimeMillis()
    println("============== Scala ============== ")
    // Scala version
    resultSet.foreach(r => {
      println(r);
      val t = (System.currentTimeMillis() - previous)
      System.out.println("Time : " + t / 1000 + " seconds")
      previous = System.currentTimeMillis()
    })

    println("============== Java ============== ")
    previous = System.currentTimeMillis()
    // Java version
    val i: java.util.Iterator[Car] = resultSet.iterator()
    while (i.hasNext) {
      val r = i.next()
      println(r);
      val t = (System.currentTimeMillis() - previous)
      System.out.println("Time : " + t / 1000  + " seconds")
      previous = System.currentTimeMillis()
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to mentioned that I'm trying to query from 2 IndexCollection. So the existsIn is used to query cars in collection 1 that also exists in collection 2 based on the attribute in your case is Car.NAME. I'll try to post more code tomorrow when I reach office – Wins Dec 23 '13 at 11:42
1  
I updated the code to a) do a exists-based join b) add a lot of cruft + NOT add an index so that CQEngine is forced to take time. In this case, both Scala and Java seem to take 1 to 3 seconds per lookup. If you add the index, garages.addIndex(HashIndex.onAttribute(Garage.BRANDS_SERVICED)), line 38, both Scala and Java finish the queries near-instantaneously...Do try this on your system and see if it gives you any insights into what is different about your code...? – vijucat Dec 23 '13 at 13:03
    
Thanks for your updated code. There are 3 more things that can simulate my code. 1. The field being matched is created randomly using 5 characters alphanumeric (just upper case to make it easy) on object in both collections 2. Submit 1 million object on both IndexCollection. 3. Replace your existIn query to existsIn(garages, Car.NAME, Garage.BRANDS_SERVICED), just 3 parameters. I.e. remove your 4th parameter. That'll really simulate my code – Wins Dec 23 '13 at 14:48
1  
I made those 3 changes and both versions are equally fast (with an addIndex()! :-( My guess is that your Scala code is missing the addIndex() while the Java code (probably in a separate file) has an addIndex()? – vijucat Dec 23 '13 at 15:40
    
Thanks for pointing to the right direction. What happen was that in Java I added the index in the constructor, while in scala, I did add the index, but it was never executed because I put it in a method resembling the class name (which I thought it is a constructor similar to Java). You didn't exactly my issue but you've pointed me to the right direction, so I'll award the bounty to you. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!! – Wins Dec 24 '13 at 2:24

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