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I'm learning about ASCII, and how it encodes characters. To my understanding (although I may be wrong because I'm still learning), it is that ASCII encodes numbers as characters. For example, something like this:

0011 0000 = 30 = '0' (this being an encoded character)

0000 0000 = 0 = 0 (while this being an actual number)

represents two different types of encoding of zero.

Question

Is there any way to display the true number for an ASCII char data type?

I attempted the following code:

#include <iostream>

int main(void) {

    char e = '0';

    std::cout << e << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(e) << std::endl;

    std::cin.get();
    std::cin.get();

return 0;
}

I know this code is not close to the result I am trying to accomplish; however, it was all I could think of. I need a better understanding of how this conversion can be accomplished through C++ syntax.

Also, please excuse me of any misleading information or title. I am still learning the "ropes" of programming.

share|improve this question
    
"ASCII encodes numbers as characters" - it's the other way around... ASCII encodes characters as numbers. (You wouldn't "encode" numbers into ASCII because in general you'd have garbage text with control characters mixed in, which is of no use to anybody, but we have to have some encoding for text to pass it around inside computers.) You were so close! –  Tony D Dec 19 '13 at 8:25
1  
All character encodings, and there are many of them, not just ASCII, use numbers to represent characters. –  Pete Becker Dec 19 '13 at 11:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Cast the char to an int.

std::cout << static_cast<int>(e);

The char actually already is an integer, it's just that the overload of operator<< taking a char displays it as a character. By using the cast to change the type to int, we are causing a different overload of the operator to be called, one which is written to display as an integer.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent explanation, but does doing this cause the Char variable 'e' to become an int data type for the rest of the program? –  Jake2k13 Dec 19 '13 at 7:11
3  
@Jake2k13: No. This operation has no effect on the e variable. It creates a new, temporary, unnamed int variable with the same value. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 19 '13 at 7:12

As per my understanding you want the actual values stored in memory that is for '0'=0x30=48. In memory char data type is also stored as integer but in 8 bit format. Because of this if you type cast the variable with int then you will get the stored value in integer format not in Ascii char.

#include <iostream>

int main(void) {

    char e = '0';

    std::cout << (int)e << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(e) << std::endl;

    std::cin.get();
    std::cin.get();

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Just by way of further explanation for the OP and other readers, static_cast<int>(e) is a new C++-only way to request the conversion that would generate a compiler error if "e" wasn't of a sensible type for this conversion, while (int)e was carried over from the C language, does the same thing, is nicely concise but a little less safe. –  Tony D Dec 19 '13 at 8:28

Something like this

#include <iostream>

int main(void) {

    char e = '0';

    std::cout << e - '\0' << std::endl;
    std::cout << sizeof(e) << std::endl;

    std::cin.get();
    std::cin.get();

    return 0;
}

Try it with char e equal any character and it will print the actual value of the character. Thanks to chris for suggesting another way of doing this; which is by casting the character to int.

std::cout << static_cast<int>(e) << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather see a cast than a subtraction of zero tbh. –  chris Dec 19 '13 at 7:05
    
@chris, isn't the "zero" in this case a "null character"? –  Jake2k13 Dec 19 '13 at 7:15
1  
Yes, but it's less clear than static_cast<int>(e) in my opinion. If shorter was always better, we'd end up with APL or Perl or something everywhere. –  chris Dec 19 '13 at 7:19
1  
@Jake2k13: It is. But there is a peculiar set of rules in the standard (often referred to as integer promotion), one of the effects of which is that, essentially, if you perform math between two operands, both of which are integer types smaller than int, they are promoted to int, and the result of the operation is an int. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 19 '13 at 7:19

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