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As the title shows, I was wondering if the below code is bad practice? I have read that this approach could be bad because of garbage collection issues, however other posts have said that this is an acceptable way of storing Objects.

Is it better to make a new class purely to deal with the list of Companies?

Thank you.

public class Company{
    private static ArrayList<Company> allCompanies = new ArrayList<>(); 
    String name;
    String email;
    String phoneNumber;
    String postalAddress;

    public Company(String name, String email, String phoneNumber, String postalAddress){
        this.name = name;
        this.email = email;
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
        this.postalAddress = postalAddress;
        allCompanies.add(this);

    }

    public static ArrayList<Company> getAllCompanies() {
        return allCompanies;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public String getPhoneNumber() {
        return phoneNumber;
    }

    public void setPhoneNumber(String phoneNumber) {
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    public String getPostalAddress() {
        return postalAddress;
    }

    public void setPostalAddress(String postalAddress) {
        this.postalAddress = postalAddress;
    }



}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you have a list of all companies? It looks like you might not need it, or if you do, it might be best to have creation and control of Company objects managed by some other class. –  user2357112 Dec 19 '13 at 10:10
    
Why is the collection allCompanies static? –  mwhs Dec 19 '13 at 10:10
    
It's not a direct duplicate, but this answer might be some use to you stackoverflow.com/questions/4457042/… –  david99world Dec 19 '13 at 10:10
    
IMHO it's a bad idea to alter any static field in a constructor. In your case, this might be the least worst option, I would consider all alternatives first. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 19 '13 at 10:11
    
Make a singleton class and add the Company objects to the arraylist in that singleton class –  Name can't be displayed Dec 19 '13 at 10:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The main issue with the code is that it has unexpected side effects.

You should be able to construct a new X, have it disappear, and have the garbage collector clean it up. In this case that new Company would stay for ever. You have also introduced thread synchronization concerns - both in that creating new objects can now simultaneously add to the same list and because you are leaking the Company object before it has been completely constructed.

For example if thread A was scanning the list at the same time as thread B created a new company then the creation would fail with a concurrent modification exception. If you managed to avoid that then potentially thread A could start trying to use the company before thread B has finished constructing it!

The correct way to do this is to have a factory object and have the factory responsible both for creating new Company objects and storing them in the list. You can make the company constructor package private to prevent people accidentally creating them other than through the factory and you can document how much thread safety the factory does or does not provide and implement the level of safety you need.

For example, A.java

public class A {
     A() { // Note none-public constructor
     }
}

AFactory.java (in same package as A.java so it can access the constructor)

public class AFactory {
    private final List<A> aList = new ArrayList(a);
    public A buildA() {
         A a = new A();
         synchronized(aList) {
             aList.add(a);
         }
         return a;
    }
}

Or if you don't need the thread safety:

public class AFactory {
    private final List<A> aList = new ArrayList<>(a);

    public A buildA() {
         A a = new A();
         aList.add(a);
         return a;
    }
}

But in this case you should always put in Javadoc comments to explain that the Factory is not thread safe and should be synchronized externally if used from more than one place.

Depending on usage you may find a Map (if you want to be able to find A's by a certain key) or a Set (if you want to prevent duplicate As) works better.

public class AFactory {
    private final Map<Key, A> aMap = new HashMap<>(a);

    public A buildA(Key key) {
         synchronized (aMap) {
             A a = aMap.get(key);
             if (a == null) {
                  a = new A();
                  aMap.put(key, a);
             }
         }
         return a;
    }

    public A getA(Key key) {
       synchronized(aMap) {
          return aMap.get(key);
       }
    }
}

Note that you may want to investigate some of the concurrent collections (java.util.concurrent) classes rather than managing the synchronization yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your comment. So would it be better if I create a class which contains a List and then when a new Company is created in the main method for example I could follow that instantiation by calling the List.add(companyIJustMade) method? That way the thread synchronization concerns may be resolved? Cheers. –  user2120977 Dec 19 '13 at 11:01
    
See edit with examples etc. –  Tim B Dec 19 '13 at 11:17
    
Great examples, thank you. –  user2120977 Dec 19 '13 at 12:02

This is indeed a bad way to do it because no Company object that is created in your program gets garbage collected, ever. Depending on how many objects you create this can be an issue.

What you essentially have here is a memory leak.

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1  
Of course, but I think the OP is asking if the entity class should manage an entity collection (list) too or refactor into a Manager class is better. The example code is not fully elaborated and may contain a static delete from listmethod too. –  PeterMmm Dec 19 '13 at 10:18

Yes, this is a not a good way.
I would suggest instead of creating an arraylist inside your company object, you should create this arraylist at the place of creating the company object... So that you can release the object from the arraylist when done with it..

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This is bad idea.

static suggests that you will always have only one collection of companies. What if you want to have two or more collections of companies? The way you proposed, you can't.

So, I would do it this way:

public class Companies extends ArrayList<Company>
{
}

On the creation of Company you can add it to specific Companies object. You can use Factory here.

So, the Company object doesn't know, that it can belong to some collection(s) of companies (which is opposite to what you have now).

Plus, your static allCompanies list holds the references to Company objects until forever. So, Company objects can't be garbage collected, when you don't need them anymore.

What is worst, your approach have serious synchronization problems. For example, in thread A you are iterating through allCompanies. In thread B you want to create Company object. Boom. ConcurrentModificationException. Even if this was synchronized - you should be able to create Company without adding it to some collection of companies.

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You have created memory leak in your program. This is a bad way of doing it.

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