Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Inside a variadic macro, #__VA_ARGS__ is a comma separated string of all parameters (at least I get this behavior with gcc and clang). Is there a way of creating an array of strings for the individual parameters without parsing that string?

I am using the code below to create debug output such as

DEBUG DUMP int main() AT demo.cc:53:
        atan2(0.5, 0.5) => 0.785398
        1 + 2 => 3
        1 == 2 => false

From code such as

debug_dump(atan2(0.5, 0.5), 1 + 2, 1 == 2);

But my current solution splits the #__VA_ARGS__ string using an ad-hoc lexer, which of course fails to parse complex cases with template parameters such as

debug_dump(std::pair<int,int>().first, 0 < 1);

because there is no easy way to distinguish which < and/or > is a bracket for template parameters and which is part of a shift or compare operation. Here is a short self-contained example for my current code (needs C++11):

#include <utility>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

void debug_dump_val_worker(int v) { fprintf(stderr, "%d", v); }
void debug_dump_val_worker(bool v) { fprintf(stderr, "%s", v ? "true" : "false"); }
void debug_dump_val_worker(double v) { fprintf(stderr, "%f", v); }
void debug_dump_args_worker(const char *) { }

template <typename T, typename ... Args>
void debug_dump_args_worker(const char *p, T first, Args ... args)
{
        int next_p_state = 0;
        const char *next_p = p;
        while (*next_p && (next_p_state != 0 || *next_p != ',')) {
                if (*next_p == '"')
                        do {
                                next_p++;
                                while (*next_p == '\\' && *(next_p + 1))
                                        next_p += 2;
                        } while (*next_p && *next_p != '"');
                if (*next_p == '\'') {
                        next_p++;
                        if (*next_p == '\\')
                                next_p++;
                        if (*next_p)
                                next_p++;
                }
                if (*next_p == '(' || *next_p == '[' || *next_p == '{')
                        next_p_state++;
                if ((*next_p == ')' || *next_p == ']' || *next_p == '}') && next_p_state > 0)
                        next_p_state--;
                next_p++;
        }
        fprintf(stderr, "\n\t%.*s => ", int (next_p - p), p);
        if (*next_p == ',')
                next_p++;
        while (*next_p == ' ' || *next_p == '\t' || *next_p == '\r' || *next_p == '\n')
                next_p++;
        debug_dump_val_worker(first);
        debug_dump_args_worker(next_p, args ...);
}

#define debug_dump(...) do { \
        fprintf(stderr, "DEBUG DUMP %s AT %s:%d:", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__, __FILE__, __LINE__); \
        debug_dump_args_worker(#__VA_ARGS__, __VA_ARGS__); \
        fprintf(stderr, "\n"); \
} while (0)

int main()
{
        debug_dump(atan2(0.5, 0.5), 1 + 2, 1 == 2);
        debug_dump(std::pair<int,int>().first, 0 < 1);
        return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
As far as the prepeocessor is concerened, std::pair<int,int> is two arguments... –  Yakk Dec 19 '13 at 10:26
    
Thanks for the quick response everyone. I'll add an assert(*p == 0) to debug_dump_args_worker(const char*) to make sure that the user did use (...) in such cases, as @steve-jessop suggested. –  CliffordVienna Dec 19 '13 at 10:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What Yakk says, the preprocessor doesn't treat the <> as matched.

So if you're to do this then your code needs to be "smarter" than the preprocessor. It takes the full C++ compiler, once __VA_ARGS__ is expanded into the arguments of the call to debug_dump_args_worker, to sort it all out and recognise that there are two arguments, not three. And in more complex cases, where >> is intended to close two template argument lists, it's not until C++11 that compilers must do that rather than treating it as an out-of-place shift operator. So in fact your code needs to be "smarter" than a C++03 compiler (that is, you need context-sensitive tokenization).

I suggest that your best option is to give up, and ask users to say:

debug_dump((std::pair<int,int>().first), 0 < 1);

instead. This is the "usual" way to get template arguments into a single macro argument. You can at least catch errors by checking that the number of expressions you extract from the string is equal to the length of your parameter pack. If a user forgets to put parens around a template argument list, then you'll find too many expressions in the string.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.