Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am new to C++11. I am writing the following recursive lambda function, but it doesn't compile.

sum.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

auto term = [](int a)->int {
  return a*a;
};

auto next = [](int a)->int {
  return ++a;
};

auto sum = [term,next,&sum](int a, int b)mutable ->int {
  if(a>b)
    return 0;
  else
    return term(a) + sum(next(a),b);
};

int main(){
  std::cout<<sum(1,10)<<std::endl;
  return 0;
}

compilation error:

vimal@linux-718q:~/Study/09C++/c++0x/lambda> g++ -std=c++0x sum.cpp

sum.cpp: In lambda function: sum.cpp:18:36: error: ‘((<lambda(int, int)>*)this)-><lambda(int, int)>::sum’ cannot be used as a function

gcc version

gcc version 4.5.0 20091231 (experimental) (GCC)

But if I change the declaration of sum() as below, it works:

std::function<int(int,int)> sum = [term,next,&sum](int a, int b)->int {
   if(a>b)
     return 0;
   else
     return term(a) + sum(next(a),b);
};

Could someone please throw light on this?

share|improve this question
    
Could this be static vs implicitly dynamic declarations? –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 14 '10 at 22:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Think about the difference between the auto version and the fully specified type version. The auto keyword infers its type from whatever it's initialized with, but what you're initializing it with needs to know what its type is (in this case, the lambda closure needs to know the types it's capturing). Something of a chicken-and-egg problem.

On the other hand, a fully specified function object's type doesn't need to "know" anything about what is being assigned to it, and so the lambda's closure can likewise be fully informed about the types its capturing.

Consider this slight modification of your code and it may make more sense:

std::function<int(int,int)> sum;
sum = [term,next,&sum](int a, int b)->int {
if(a>b)
    return 0;
else
    return term(a) + sum(next(a),b);
};

Obviously, this wouldn't work with auto. Recursive lambda functions work perfectly well (at least they do in MSVC, where I have experience with them), it's just that they aren't really compatible with type inference.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't agree with this. The type of the lambda is well-known as soon as the function body is entered- there's no reason that it shouldn't be deduced by then. –  Puppy Jun 23 '11 at 12:30
10  
@DeadMG but the spec forbids referring to the auto variable in the initializer of it. the type of the auto variable is not known yet when the initializer is being processed. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 23 '11 at 17:33
1  
Wondering why this isn't marked as 'answer', and that Python one is classified as 'Answer' ?! –  Ajay Jan 26 '13 at 6:05
    
@Puppy: In the case of an implicit capture, though, for efficiency only referenced variables are actually captured, so the body must be parsed. –  kec Dec 4 '14 at 23:30

You can make a lambda function call itself recursively. The only thing you need to do is to is to reference it through a function wrapper so that the compiler knows it's return and argument type (you can't capture a variable -- the lambda itself -- that hasn't been defined yet).

  function<int (int)> f;

  f = [&f](int x) {
    if (x == 0) return 0;
    return x + f(x-1);
  };

  printf("%d\n", f(10));

Be very careful not to run out of the scope of the wrapper f.

share|improve this answer

I have another solution, but work only with stateless lambdas:

void f()
{
    static int (*self)(int) = [](int i)->int { return i>0 ? self(i-1)*i : 1; };
    std::cout<<self(10);
}

Trick here is that lambdas can access static variables and you can convert stateless ones to function pointer.

You can use it with standard lambdas:

void g()
{
    int sum;
    auto rec = [&sum](int i) -> int
    {
        static int (*inner)(int&, int) = [](int& _sum, int i)->int 
        {
            _sum += i;
            return i>0 ? inner(_sum, i-1)*i : 1; 
        };
        return inner(sum, i);
    };
}

Its work in GCC 4.7

share|improve this answer
    
This should have better performance than std::function, so +1 for the alternative. But really, at this point I wonder if using lambdas is the best option ;) –  Antoine Feb 27 '14 at 9:48

I ran a benchmark comparing a recursive function vs a recursive lambda function using the std::function<> capture method. With full optimizations enabled on clang version 4.1, the lambda version ran significantly slower.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <chrono>

uint64_t sum1(int n) {
  return (n <= 1) ? 1 : n + sum1(n - 1);
}

std::function<uint64_t(int)> sum2 = [&] (int n) {
  return (n <= 1) ? 1 : n + sum2(n - 1);
};

auto const ITERATIONS = 10000;
auto const DEPTH = 100000;

template <class Func, class Input>
void benchmark(Func&& func, Input&& input) {
  auto t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
  for (auto i = 0; i != ITERATIONS; ++i) {
    func(input);
  }
  auto t2 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
  auto duration = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(t2-t1).count();
  std::cout << "Duration: " << duration << std::endl;
}

int main() {
  benchmark(sum1, DEPTH);
  benchmark(sum2, DEPTH);
}

Produces results:

Duration: 0 // regular function
Duration: 4027 // lambda function

(Note: I also confirmed with a version that took the inputs from cin, so as to eliminate compile time evaluation)

Clang also produces a compiler warning:

main.cc:10:29: warning: variable 'sum2' is uninitialized when used within its own initialization [-Wuninitialized]

Which is expected, and safe, but should be noted.

It's great to have a solution in our toolbelts, but I think the language will need a better way to handle this case if performance is to be comparable to current methods.

Note:

As a commenter pointed out, it seems latest version of VC++ has found a way to optimize this to the point of equal performance. Maybe we don't need a better way to handle this, after all (except for syntactic sugar).

Also, as some other SO posts have outlined in recent weeks, the performance of std::function<> itself may be the cause of slowdown vs calling function directly, at least when the lambda capture is too large to fit into some library-optimized space std::function uses for small-functors (I guess kinda like the various short string optimizations?).

share|improve this answer
1  
-1. Notice that the only reason the "lambda" version takes longer is because you bind it to an std::function, which makes the operator() call a virtual call, and that would obviously take longer. On top of that, your code, in VS2012 release mode, took about the same amount of time in both cases. –  Yam Marcovic Feb 27 '13 at 16:52
    
@YamMarcovic What? That is currently the only known way to write a recursive lambda (that was the point of the example). I'm very pleased to know that VS2012 has found a way to optimize this use case (though there have been more developments on this topic recently, apparently if my lambda had captured more it would not have fit within the std::function small-memory functor optimizations or whatnot). –  mmocny Feb 27 '13 at 18:46
2  
Acknowledged. I misunderstood your post. +1 then. Gah, can only upvote if you edit this answer. So could you emphasize it a bit more, such as in the comment? –  Yam Marcovic Feb 27 '13 at 19:46
1  
@YamMarcovic Done. I appreciate your willingness to provide feedback and refine it when needed. +1 to you, good sir. –  mmocny Feb 27 '13 at 20:40

This is a slightly simpler implementation of the fixpoint operator which makes it a little more obvious exactly what's going on.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

template<typename T, typename... Args>
struct fixpoint
{
    typedef function<T(Args...)> effective_type;
    typedef function<T(const effective_type&, Args...)> function_type;

    function_type f_nonr;

    T operator()(Args... args) const
    {
        return f_nonr(*this, args...);
    }

    fixpoint(const function_type& p_f)
        : f_nonr(p_f)
    {
    }
};


int main()
{
    auto fib_nonr = [](const function<int(int)>& f, int n) -> int
    {
        return n < 2 ? n : f(n-1) + f(n-2);
    };

    auto fib = fixpoint<int,int>(fib_nonr);

    for (int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
    {
        cout << fib(i) << '\n';
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you could improve your answer (performance wise) if you replace std::function with function pointer (of cores it will only work with normal function, and stateless lambdas). Btw fib_nonr should accept fixpoint<int,int>, if you use std::function its require crating new copy from *this. –  Yankes Mar 1 '14 at 15:28

You're trying to capture a variable (sum) you're in the middle of defining. That can't be good.

I don't think truely self-recursive C++0x lambdas are possible. You should be able to capture other lambdas, though.

share|improve this answer
3  
but it does work if declaration of sum is changed from 'auto' to std::function<int(int,int)> without changing the capture-list. –  weima Jan 14 '10 at 22:38
    
Because it is no longer a lambda then, but a function which can be used in place of lambda? –  Hamish Grubijan Jan 14 '10 at 22:45

You need a fixed point combinator. See this.

or look at the following code:

//As decltype(variable)::member_name is invalid currently, 
//the following template is a workaround.
//Usage: t2t<decltype(variable)>::t::member_name
template<typename T>
struct t2t
{
    typedef T t;
};

template<typename R, typename V>
struct fixpoint
{
    typedef std::function<R (V)> func_t;
    typedef std::function<func_t (func_t)> tfunc_t;
    typedef std::function<func_t (tfunc_t)> yfunc_t;

    class loopfunc_t {
    public:
        func_t operator()(loopfunc_t v)const {
            return func(v);
        }
        template<typename L>
        loopfunc_t(const L &l):func(l){}
        typedef V Parameter_t;
    private:
        std::function<func_t (loopfunc_t)> func;
    };
    static yfunc_t fix;
};
template<typename R, typename V>
typename fixpoint<R, V>::yfunc_t fixpoint<R, V>::fix = 
[](fixpoint<R, V>::tfunc_t f) -> fixpoint<R, V>::func_t {
    fixpoint<R, V>::loopfunc_t l = [f](fixpoint<R, V>::loopfunc_t x) ->
        fixpoint<R, V>::func_t{
            //f cannot be captured since it is not a local variable
            //of this scope. We need a new reference to it.
            auto &ff = f;
            //We need struct t2t because template parameter
            //V is not accessable in this level.
            return [ff, x](t2t<decltype(x)>::t::Parameter_t v){
                return ff(x(x))(v); 
            };
        }; 
        return l(l);
    };

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int v = 0;
    std::function<int (int)> fac = 
    fixpoint<int, int>::fix([](std::function<int (int)> f)
        -> std::function<int (int)>{
        return [f](int i) -> int{
            if(i==0) return 1;
            else return i * f(i-1);
        };
    });

    int i = fac(10);
    std::cout << i; //3628800
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is the final answer for the OP. Anyway, Visual Studio 2010 does not support capturing global variables. And you do not need to capture them because global variable is accessable globally by define. The following answer uses local variable instead.

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
struct t2t
{
    typedef T t;
};

template<typename R, typename V1, typename V2>
struct fixpoint
{
    typedef std::function<R (V1, V2)> func_t;
    typedef std::function<func_t (func_t)> tfunc_t;
    typedef std::function<func_t (tfunc_t)> yfunc_t;

    class loopfunc_t {
    public:
        func_t operator()(loopfunc_t v)const {
            return func(v);
        }
        template<typename L>
        loopfunc_t(const L &l):func(l){}
        typedef V1 Parameter1_t;
        typedef V2 Parameter2_t;
    private:
        std::function<func_t (loopfunc_t)> func;
    };
    static yfunc_t fix;
};
template<typename R, typename V1, typename V2>
typename fixpoint<R, V1, V2>::yfunc_t fixpoint<R, V1, V2>::fix = [](tfunc_t f) -> func_t {
    return [f](fixpoint<R, V1, V2>::loopfunc_t x){  return f(x(x)); }
    ([f](fixpoint<R, V1, V2>::loopfunc_t x) -> fixpoint<R, V1, V2>::func_t{
        auto &ff = f;
        return [ff, x](t2t<decltype(x)>::t::Parameter1_t v1, 
            t2t<decltype(x)>::t::Parameter1_t v2){
            return ff(x(x))(v1, v2);
        }; 
    });
};

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    auto term = [](int a)->int {
      return a*a;
    };

    auto next = [](int a)->int {
      return ++a;
    };

    auto sum = fixpoint<int, int, int>::fix(
    [term,next](std::function<int (int, int)> sum1) -> std::function<int (int, int)>{
        auto &term1 = term;
        auto &next1 = next;
        return [term1, next1, sum1](int a, int b)mutable ->int {
            if(a>b)
                return 0;
        else
            return term1(a) + sum1(next1(a),b);
        };
    });

    std::cout<<sum(1,10)<<std::endl; //385

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Most readable code I've ever seen! –  Greg Krsak Jan 20 '14 at 3:47

This answer is inferior to Yankes' one, but still, here it goes:

using dp_type = void (*)();

using fp_type = void (*)(dp_type, unsigned, unsigned);

fp_type fp = [](dp_type dp, unsigned const a, unsigned const b) {
  ::std::cout << a << ::std::endl;
  return reinterpret_cast<fp_type>(dp)(dp, b, a + b);
};

fp(reinterpret_cast<dp_type>(fp), 0, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
I think you should avoid reinterpret_cast. Probably best way in your case is create some struct that replace dp_type. It should have field fp_type, can be constructed from fp_type and have operator () with arguments like fp_type. This will be close to std::function but will allow self referencing argument. –  Yankes Feb 27 '14 at 15:28
    
I wanted to post a minimal example, without a struct, feel free to edit my answer and provide a more complete solution. A struct would also add an additional level of indirection. The example works and the cast is standard-compliant, I don't know what the -1 was for. –  user1095108 Feb 27 '14 at 17:43
    
no, struct will work only as container for pointer and will be passed as value. This will be no more indirection or overhead than pointer. And about -1 I didnt know who give it to you, but I think its because reinterpret_cast should be used as a last resort. –  Yankes Feb 27 '14 at 23:30
    
The cast is supposedly guaranteed to work by the c++11 standard. Using a struct, in my eyes, could defeat the the use of a lambda object. After all, the struct you propose is a functor, utilizing a lambda object. –  user1095108 Feb 28 '14 at 8:42
    
Look at @Pseudonym solution, remove only std::function and you will have something close to that I had in mind. This probably will have similar performance to your solution. –  Yankes Mar 1 '14 at 15:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.