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public <return_type> getclass(string company)
{
    switch (company)
    {
        case "cmp1": Classcmp1 temp = new Classcmp1(); return temp ;
        case "cmp2": Classcmp2 temp = new Classcmp2(); return temp ;
        case "cmp3": Classcmp3 temp = new Classcmp3(); return temp ; 
    }
}

What should be the return type of this function if classcmp1 ,classcmp2 , classcmp3 are three public classes? How to determine this dynamically?

share|improve this question
    
object should be the return type – Saghir A. Khatri Dec 19 '13 at 11:19
1  
You must return an ancestor for all the possible classes. As last resource, you can return Object. – Giacomo Degli Esposti Dec 19 '13 at 11:20
1  
I assume they are related, then you could create an interface, let all classes implement it and return that. – Tim Schmelter Dec 19 '13 at 11:21
    
Additional hint: In C# class names should be upper-case and variable names should be lower-case. – Christoph Brückmann Dec 19 '13 at 11:28
    
i have 3 seperate classes say Report1.cs, Report2.cs, Report3.cs .. each has same funtion names, but with different definitions. I need to call those funtions for one of the above class according to the company name – gjijo Dec 19 '13 at 12:15
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can always return an object, because all classes inherits from object:

public object getclass(string Company)
{
    switch (Company)
    {
        case "cmp1": classcmp1 temp = new classcmp1(); return temp ;
        case "cmp2": classcmp2 temp = new classcmp2(); return temp ;
        case "cmp3": classcmp3 temp = new classcmp3(); return temp ; 
    }
}

Else you can build a class from which your three classes will inherit :

public class classcmp { }
public class classcmp1 : classcmp {}
public class classcmp2 : classcmp {}
public class classcmp3 : classcmp {}

public classcmp getclass(string Company)
{
    switch (Company)
    {
        case "cmp1": classcmp1 temp = new classcmp1(); return temp ;
        case "cmp2": classcmp2 temp = new classcmp2(); return temp ;
        case "cmp3": classcmp3 temp = new classcmp3(); return temp ; 
    }
}

Else, you can build an interface:

public interface Iclasscmp { }
public class classcmp1 : Iclasscmp {}
public class classcmp2 : Iclasscmp {}
public class classcmp3 : Iclasscmp {}

public Iclasscmp getclass(string Company)
{
    switch (Company)
    {
        case "cmp1": classcmp1 temp = new classcmp1(); return temp ;
        case "cmp2": classcmp2 temp = new classcmp2(); return temp ;
        case "cmp3": classcmp3 temp = new classcmp3(); return temp ; 
    }
}

The choice that you will make will influence the architecture of your program. With no more information on the use of the class you will need, it is hard to help you more than that.

share|improve this answer
    
say, classcmp1 has a fn sum(), classcmp2 has another sub() etc, How can I use getclass("cmp2").sub(); – gjijo Dec 19 '13 at 11:55

Do all the classcmpX classes share a common class/interface?

  • If so, return that type.
  • If not, can you make them extend/implement a common class/interface?
  • If not, return object, the class that all types in c# extend (*).

(*) well, except for pointer types.

share|improve this answer

Object is most generic retunn type, you may try this.

Further you do not need to initialize temp, just create.initliaze the object and return it.

public object getclass(string Company)
{
    switch (Company)
    {
        case "cmp1": return new classcmp1();
        case "cmp2": return new classcmp2();
        case "cmp3": return new classcmp3();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think the best solution in your case would be an interface like Cyril Gandon already suggested.

public interface IClasscmp {}
public class Classcmp1 : IClasscmp {}
public class Classcmp2 : IClasscmp {}
public class Classcmp3 : IClasscmp {}

public IClasscmp GetClass(string company)
{
    switch (company)
    {
        case "cmp1": return new Classcmp1();
        case "cmp2": return new Classcmp2();
        case "cmp3": return new Classcmp3(); 
    }
}

But it would also be good to use the right naming conventions for C#. It supports a better readability and the syntax highlighting here on stackoverflow will also work. ;) See: Naming Convention in c#

share|improve this answer

Your getClass method must provide classes 'somehow' related : do they implement a common interface ? do they all inherit from the same parent class ?
What you should do is to have this relation explicit, then you can use this parent class or interface as a return type for your getClass method.

The choice of having an inheritance scheme vs having the classes implement the same interface is quite arbitrary. The common question is to ask yourself if your classes 'are' the same thing (inheritance) or if they 'have' the same behaviour (interface). Apples and Oranges 'are' fruits, and they 'have' a weight, so they inherit Fruits and implement IWeight... But just as well they 'are' SolidObjects and implement ITasteGood :-)

In your case i tend to believe you want to do a parent Abstract/Virtual (MustInherit in VB) Class from which your 3 classes will inherit.

I did not understand if your methods have the same signature (== parameter list). If it's not the case, remember you can send all parameters through a single object, and have again same signature.

(( Just for the record, the pattern you're implementing here (provide a class depending on a parameter) is a factory pattern. ))

share|improve this answer
    
i have 3 seperate classes say Report1.cs, Report2.cs, Report3.cs .. each has same funtion names, but with different definitions. I need to call those funtions for one of the above class according to the company name – gjijo Dec 19 '13 at 12:15
    
i edited to clarify. – GameAlchemist Dec 19 '13 at 12:34

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