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I am trying to test this behavior

-- BLOGTableAdapter.GetBlogsByTitle(string title) is called and for once only

-- and is called with string having length greater than 1,

-- and it returns BLOGDataTable Object

 [Test]
    public void GetBlogsByBlogTitleTest4()
    {
        var mockAdapter = new Mock<BLOGTableAdapter>();
        var mockTable = new Mock<BLOGDataTable>();

        mockAdapter.Setup(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0))).Returns(mockTable.Object);

        var blogBl = new BlogManagerBLL(mockAdapter.Object);
        blogBl.GetBlogsByBlogTitle("Thanks for reading my question");

        mockAdapter.VerifyAll();
        mockAdapter.Verify(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0)), Times.Exactly(1));
    }

When a calls is made to GetBlogsByTitle(string title), in class say "BlogManagerBLL" in Data Aceess Layer

public BLOGDataTable GetBlogsByBlogTitle(string title)
        {
            return Adapter.GetBlogsByTitle(title);
        }

As you can see, I am using two seperate statements to get these checks done

mockAdapter.Setup(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0))).Returns(mockTable.Object);    
mockAdapter.Verify(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0)), Times.Exactly(1));
  1. How can I put this into one statement ?
  2. Am I testing right things ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why would you want to put it in one statement? It is clearer using two. –  Robert Harvey Jan 14 '10 at 22:52
    
Because, for the sake of one check, that this method is called once, I have to write second statement. I cannot find any way to get this checked in first one. –  Asad Butt Jan 14 '10 at 22:55
    
cannot put "Times.Exactly(1)" or similar check in first statement ? –  Asad Butt Jan 14 '10 at 22:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're testing two things, you should write two tests.

[Test]
public void BlogTableAdapter_should_be_called_with_string_having_length_greater_than_1()
{
    var mockAdapter = new Mock<BLOGTableAdapter>();

    var blogBl = new BlogManagerBLL(mockAdapter.Object);
    blogBl.GetBlogsByBlogTitle("Thanks for reading my question");

    mockAdapter.Verify(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0)));
}

and

[Test]
public void BlogTableAdapter_should_return_a_BLOGDataTable_object()
{
    var mockAdapter = new Mock<BLOGTableAdapter>();
    mockAdapter.Setup(x => x.GetBlogsByTitle(It.Is<string>(s => s.Length > 0))).Returns(new BLOGDataTable());

    var blogBl = new BlogManagerBLL(mockAdapter.Object);
    var returnValue = blogBl.GetBlogsByBlogTitle("Thanks for reading my question");

    Assert.That(returnValue, Is.TypeOf(typeof(BLOGDataTable)));
}

So I guess my advice is don't put them together, create a test for each. And I'd say you're testing the right things.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks mate, do appreciate –  Asad Butt Jan 15 '10 at 9:58
    
just another point: I though we should use one [Test] method for corresponding method in our code class ? you are suggesting a test method for every check for the corresponding method ? say I have 3 methods in a class and want to check 4 things each, there are going to be 12 [Test] methods ? write ? should a write separate [TestFixture] for each method ? –  Asad Butt Jan 15 '10 at 10:55
    
@Asad: Chris is right, I've never heard the bit about one test method per method. One assert per test is more standard. The Art of Unit Testing has good guidance on this. –  TrueWill Sep 2 '11 at 18:23

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