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On a Windows PC is it possible for a C++ program to know or find out which javabean is currently running in a separate Java program?

Now I don't know too much about what a javabean actually means or does beyond the basics, but I've been told that it might be possible. I don't think it will be, though, since Java runs in a virtual machine and all the classes are internal only.

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2 Answers 2

It's impossible to know.

But you can create some framework to make it possible. Possible a socket communication.

You can create a Thread in your Java program that listen to this beans, and reply all information in a socket. Your C program, should listen this port, and reply all information.

Why you don't include your C code with JNI?

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The two programs are both large, pre-existing applications. At the moment only very minor changes can be made to the java application, if any at all. I do have another method for the final result we're trying to achieve but it's quite hacky and ugly... –  Chro Dec 19 '13 at 12:45
    
I believe there is no easy solution. For some similar sotions I made the java process call for command line the C++ process. But, as you describe, I believe is not possible. –  Victor Dec 19 '13 at 12:57
    
I believe is not so hard. Create a Socket between the both programs and send JSON objects. –  Victor Dec 19 '13 at 13:00
    
Unfortunately I don't think that's possible for us to implement at the moment. Thank you for your help and ideas though! –  Chro Dec 19 '13 at 13:35

if it's really possible (technically) it will be pretty hard to do.

You will need to know a lot about the JVM and how it works. I would say you must be kind of a hardcore geek to do stuff like this. And no offense, but i think you're not.

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