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I would like to either prevent or handle a StackOverflowException that I am getting from a call to the XslCompiledTransform.Transform method within an Xsl Editor I am writing. The problem seems to be that the user can write an Xsl script that is infinitely recursive, and it just blows up on the call to the Transform method. (That is, the problem is not just the typical programmatic error, which is usually the cause of such an exception.)

Is there a way to detect and/or limit how many recursions are allowed? Or any other ideas to keep this code from just blowing up on me?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

From Microsoft:

Starting with the .NET Framework version 2.0, a StackOverflowException object cannot be caught by a try-catch block and the corresponding process is terminated by default. Consequently, users are advised to write their code to detect and prevent a stack overflow. For example, if your application depends on recursion, use a counter or a state condition to terminate the recursive loop.

I'm assuming the exception is happening within an internal .NET method, and not in your code.

You can do a couple things.

  • Write code that checks the xsl for infinite recursion and notifies the user prior to applying a transform (Ugh).
  • Load the XslTransform code into a separate process (Hacky, but less work).

You can use the Process class to load the assembly that will apply the transform into a separate process, and alert the user of the failure if it dies, without killing your main app.

EDIT: I just tested, here is how to do it:

MainProcess:

// This is just an example, obviously you'll want to pass args to this.
Process p1 = new Process();
p1.StartInfo.FileName = "ApplyTransform.exe";
p1.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
p1.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;

p1.Start();
p1.WaitForExit();

if (p1.ExitCode == 1)    
   Console.WriteLine("StackOverflow was thrown");

ApplyTransform Process:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(CurrentDomain_UnhandledException);
        throw new StackOverflowException();
    }

    // We trap this, we can't save the process, 
    // but we can prevent the "ILLEGAL OPERATION" window 
    static void CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.IsTerminating)
        {
            Environment.Exit(1);
        }
    }
}
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9  
There is a subtle difference between catching a StackOverflowException your code throws and one the runtime throws. It's perfectly OK to handle a stack overflow you throw. Handling a runtime version though is very different. –  JaredPar Oct 16 '08 at 2:03
1  
I initially didn't see what you meant, but after I added a recursive loop to my test code, I see what you mean. You can't trap the UnhandledException in that case...However, splitting it into a separate process will prevent the app from dieing, making it only a minor inconvenience for the user. –  FlySwat Oct 16 '08 at 4:32

I would suggest creating a wrapper around XmlWriter object, so it would count amount of calls to WriteStartElement/WriteEndElement, and if you limit amount of tags to some number (f.e. 100), you would be able to throw a different exception, for example - InvalidOperation.

That should solve the problem in the majority of the cases

public class LimitedDepthXmlWriter : XmlWriter
{
    private readonly XmlWriter _innerWriter;
    private readonly int _maxDepth;
    private int _depth;

    public LimitedDepthXmlWriter(XmlWriter innerWriter): this(innerWriter, 100)
    {
    }

    public LimitedDepthXmlWriter(XmlWriter innerWriter, int maxDepth)
    {
        _maxDepth = maxDepth;
        _innerWriter = innerWriter;
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        _innerWriter.Close();
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        _innerWriter.Flush();
    }

    public override string LookupPrefix(string ns)
    {
        return _innerWriter.LookupPrefix(ns);
    }

    public override void WriteBase64(byte[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteBase64(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteCData(string text)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteCData(text);
    }

    public override void WriteCharEntity(char ch)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteCharEntity(ch);
    }

    public override void WriteChars(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteChars(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteComment(string text)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteComment(text);
    }

    public override void WriteDocType(string name, string pubid, string sysid, string subset)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteDocType(name, pubid, sysid, subset);
    }

    public override void WriteEndAttribute()
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteEndAttribute();
    }

    public override void WriteEndDocument()
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteEndDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteEndElement()
    {
        _depth--;

        _innerWriter.WriteEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteEntityRef(string name)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteEntityRef(name);
    }

    public override void WriteFullEndElement()
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteFullEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteProcessingInstruction(string name, string text)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteProcessingInstruction(name, text);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(string data)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteRaw(data);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteRaw(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteStartAttribute(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteStartAttribute(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument(bool standalone)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteStartDocument(standalone);
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument()
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteStartDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteStartElement(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        if (_depth++ > _maxDepth) ThrowException();

        _innerWriter.WriteStartElement(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override WriteState WriteState
    {
        get { return _innerWriter.WriteState; }
    }

    public override void WriteString(string text)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteString(text);
    }

    public override void WriteSurrogateCharEntity(char lowChar, char highChar)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteSurrogateCharEntity(lowChar, highChar);
    }

    public override void WriteWhitespace(string ws)
    {
        _innerWriter.WriteWhitespace(ws);
    }

    private void ThrowException()
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException(string.Format("Result xml has more than {0} nested tags. It is possible that xslt transformation contains an endless recursive call.", _maxDepth));
    }
}
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With .NET 4.0 You can add the HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions attribute from System.Runtime.ExceptionServices to the method containing the try/catch block. This really worked! Maybe not recommended but works.

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Runtime.ExceptionServices;

namespace ExceptionCatching
{
    public class Test
    {
        public void StackOverflow()
        {
            StackOverflow();
        }

        public void CustomException()
        {
            throw new Exception();
        }

        public unsafe void AccessViolation()
        {
            byte b = *(byte*)(8762765876);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        [HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions]
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test test = new Test();
            try {
                //test.StackOverflow();
                test.AccessViolation();
                //test.CustomException();
            }
            catch
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Caught.");
            }

            Console.WriteLine("End of program");

        }

    }      
}
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4  
HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions doesn't allow you to handle StackOverflowException. –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 27 '10 at 4:26

If you application depends on 3d-party code (in Xsl-scripts) then you have to decide first do you want to defend from bugs in them or not. If you really want to defend then I think you should execute your logic which prone to external errors in separate AppDomains. Catching StackOverflowException is not good.

Check also this question.

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Running code in a new AppDomain will not prevent the whole process to be taken down by a StackOverflowException. Such an exception cannot be caught in .NET from v2 and up. –  Abel Nov 29 '13 at 1:30

I had a stackoverflow today and i read some of your posts and decided to help out the Garbage Collecter.

I used to have a near infinite loop like this:

    class Foo
    {
        public Foo()
        {
            Go();
        }

        public void Go()
        {
            for (float i = float.MinValue; i < float.MaxValue; i+= 0.000000000000001f)
            {
                byte[] b = new byte[1]; // Causes stackoverflow
            }
        }
    }

Instead let the resource run out of scope like this:

class Foo
{
    public Foo()
    {
        GoHelper();
    }

    public void GoHelper()
    {
        for (float i = float.MinValue; i < float.MaxValue; i+= 0.000000000000001f)
        {
            Go();
        }
    }

    public void Go()
    {
        byte[] b = new byte[1]; // Will get cleaned by GC
    }   // right now
}

It worked for me, hope it helps someone.

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1  
This is a good solution for writing a method that requires a lot of stack space (the byte array is allocated on the stack) in a way that it clears the stack after each call. However, it is not the garbage collector, it is the stack unwinding (after exiting the Go-method) that causes the stack-memory to be available again. GC only applies for heap memory. –  Abel Nov 29 '13 at 1:33

You can read up this property every few calls, Environment.StackTrace , and if the stacktrace exceded a specific threshold that you preset, you can return the function.

You should also try to replace some recursive functions with loops.

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How can he do that from within XSLT? It is XslCompiledTransform that throws this exception. –  Abel Nov 29 '13 at 1:35

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