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In psuedo code, this is what I want.

var selector = $(this).cssSelectorAsString(); // Made up method...
// selector is now something like: "html>body>ul>li>img[3]"
var element = $(selector);

The reason is that I need to pass this off to an external environment, where a string is my only way to exchange data. This external environment then needs to send back a result, along with what element to update. So I need to be able to serialize a unique CSS selector for every element on the page.

I noticed jquery has a selector method, but it does not appear to work in this context. It only works if the object was created with a selector. It does not work if the object was created with an HTML node object.

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Does the selector have to use the jQuery syntax (e.g. eq()), or can it be a general CSS selector as provided by many libraries? –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 5:10

8 Answers 8

up vote 36 down vote accepted

I see now that a plugin existed (with the same name I thought of too), but here's just some quick JavaScript I wrote. It takes no consideration to the ids or classes of elements – only the structure (and adds :eq(x) where a node name is ambiguous).

jQuery.fn.getPath = function () {
    if (this.length != 1) throw 'Requires one element.';

    var path, node = this;
    while (node.length) {
        var realNode = node[0], name = realNode.localName;
        if (!name) break;
        name = name.toLowerCase();

        var parent = node.parent();

        var siblings = parent.children(name);
        if (siblings.length > 1) { 
            name += ':eq(' + siblings.index(realNode) + ')';
        }

        path = name + (path ? '>' + path : '');
        node = parent;
    }

    return path;
};
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1  
jQuery has a built-in index function that can take care of the loop part. Just say var i = siblings.index(node) and that ought to work. –  Dan Jan 15 '10 at 0:00
    
@Dan: Ah, I had a feeling there'd be something like that, thanks =) –  Blixt Jan 15 '10 at 0:06
    
+1 Nice solution. I've made a solution working with multiple jQuery elements. But actually without your latest improvements. Maybe I will update it soon. See my answer... –  algorhythm Nov 5 '14 at 17:29
1  
I'm not sure if the solution to use an id if found is the better one. I know an id had to be unique, but I saw so many HTML code where the programmer didn't noticed that and used same id's multiole times. And I also know, that jQuery behaves different with not unique id's in different browsers. What do you think? –  algorhythm Nov 5 '14 at 17:51
    
@algorhythm: that's why you should use a library: the problem is more complex than it seems. One such library explicitly checks that the id is indeed unique. –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 8:31

jQuery-GetPath is a good starting point: it'll give you the item's ancestors, like this:

var path = $('#foo').getPath();
// e.g., "html > body > div#bar > ul#abc.def.ghi > li#foo"
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jQuery-GetPath isn't on Github, and apparently hasn't been maintained since 2011. There are 10+ legit libraries that generate CSS selectors, and the author of one of them has published this comparison. –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 4:39

Here's a version of Blixt's answer that works in IE:

jQuery.fn.getPath = function () {
    if (this.length != 1) throw 'Requires one element.';

    var path, node = this;
    while (node.length) {
        var realNode = node[0];
        var name = (

            // IE9 and non-IE
            realNode.localName ||

            // IE <= 8
            realNode.tagName ||
            realNode.nodeName

        );

        // on IE8, nodeName is '#document' at the top level, but we don't need that
        if (!name || name == '#document') break;

        name = name.toLowerCase();
        if (realNode.id) {
            // As soon as an id is found, there's no need to specify more.
            return name + '#' + realNode.id + (path ? '>' + path : '');
        } else if (realNode.className) {
            name += '.' + realNode.className.split(/\s+/).join('.');
        }

        var parent = node.parent(), siblings = parent.children(name);
        if (siblings.length > 1) name += ':eq(' + siblings.index(node) + ')';
        path = name + (path ? '>' + path : '');

        node = parent;
    }

    return path;
};
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This problem may seem simple, but in actuality it's a little more complex - generating unique CSS selectors that ideally are somewhat robust to changes in the page structure. There are 10+ libraries that generate CSS selectors, and the author of one of them has published this comparison. –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 4:40

I just wanted to share my version too because it is very clear to understand. I tested this script in all common browsers and it is working like a boss.

jQuery.fn.getPath = function () {
    var current = $(this);
    var path = new Array();
    var realpath = "BODY";
    while ($(current).prop("tagName") != "BODY") {
        var index = $(current).parent().find($(current).prop("tagName")).index($(current));
        var name = $(current).prop("tagName");
        var selector = " " + name + ":eq(" + index + ") ";
        path.push(selector);
        current = $(current).parent();
    }
    while (path.length != 0) {
        realpath += path.pop();
    }
    return realpath;
}
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A selector that doesn't use ids is fragile. –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 4:41

Same solution like that one from @Blixt but compatible with multiple jQuery elements.

jQuery('.some-selector') can result in one or many DOM elements. @Blixt's solution works unfortunately only with the first one. My solution concatenates all them with ,.

If you want just handle the first element do it like this:

jQuery('.some-selector').first().getPath();

// or
jQuery('.some-selector:first').getPath();

Improved version

jQuery.fn.extend({
    getPath: function() {
        var pathes = [];

        this.each(function(index, element) {
            var path, $node = jQuery(element);

            while ($node.length) {
                var realNode = $node.get(0), name = realNode.localName;
                if (!name) { break; }

                name = name.toLowerCase();
                var parent = $node.parent();
                var sameTagSiblings = parent.children(name);

                if (sameTagSiblings.length > 1)
                {
                    allSiblings = parent.children();
                    var index = allSiblings.index(realNode) +1;
                    if (index > 0) {
                        name += ':nth-child(' + index + ')';
                    }
                }

                path = name + (path ? ' > ' + path : '');
                $node = parent;
            }

            pathes.push(path);
        });

        return pathes.join(',');
    }
});
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TL;DR - this is a more complex problem than it seems and you should use a library.


This problem appears easy at the first glance, but it's trickier than it seems, just as replacing plain URLs with links is non-trivial. Some considerations:

Further proof that the problem isn't as easy as it seems: there are 10+ libraries that generate CSS selectors, and the author of one of them has published this comparison.

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Following up on what alex wrote. jQuery-GetPath is a great starting point but I have modified it a little to incorporate :eq(), allowing me to distinguish between multiple id-less elements.

Add this before the getPath return line:

if (typeof id == 'undefined' && cur != 'body') {
    allSiblings = $(this).parent().children(cur);
    var index = allSiblings.index(this);// + 1;
    //if (index > 0) {
        cur += ':eq(' + index + ')';
    //}
}

This will return a path like "html > body > ul#hello > li.5:eq(1)"

share|improve this answer
    
There are 10+ libraries that generate CSS selectors, and the author of one of them has published this comparison. –  Dan Dascalescu Aug 26 at 4:42
$.fn.getSelector = function(){
    var $ele = $(this);
    return '#' + $ele.parents('[id!=""]').first().attr('id') 
               + ' .' + $ele.attr('class');
};
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2  
How is that going to help for solving the problem? –  Yasen Zhelev Apr 10 at 15:19
    
Oops, sorry, I should have mentioned this only works for selectors like '#foo .bar' which are very common in the world I live in. –  pepper69 Apr 10 at 19:41

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