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Why the two threading implementations in python are behaving differently ?

I have two codes:


from threading import Thread
import pdb
import time

def test_var_kwargs(**kwargs):

  print kwargs['name']
  for key in kwargs:
    print "another keyword arg: %s: %s" % (key, kwargs[key])

def get_call():
  thr = Thread(target=test_var_kwargs(name='xyz', roll=12))
  print "!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

print "hohohoo"


import threading 
import time

class Typewriter(threading.Thread):

  def __init__(self, your_string):
    self.my_string = your_string

  def run(self):
    for char in self.my_string:
        print "in run"

typer = Typewriter("hehe")
# wait for it to finish if you want to

In first code execution, the print stmt. and get_call() executed after 5 secs, which means the next line of execution of code got blocked. While in the second code, the print stmt. i.e. print "HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH" got printed without waiting for sleep() time.

My question is why the first code execution got blocked while the second code executed unblocked ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It took me a little while to figure the problem out...

This line:

thr = Thread(target=test_var_kwargs(name='xyz', roll=12))

Is incorrect. Try:

thr = Thread(target=test_var_kwargs, kwargs={'name':'xyz', 'roll': 12})

The first example is blocking on the 5 seconds time.sleep because you are calling the target function just before you create the thread object. That call returns None so the actual creation of that thread looks like this:

thr = Thread(target=None)

While that is not an error it will finish immediately. But not before the call to test_var_kwargs has completed.

share|improve this answer
+1 , true its more a semantic error where python doesn't flag it as error. thnx – nebi Dec 19 '13 at 15:59
Hey Nebi, if the answer solves the problem it's good stackoverflow etiquette to mark it as correct. It lets people who read this answer later immediately know that it was right. – aychedee Dec 19 '13 at 16:31

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