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I am new to Angularjs and learning. I am trying to build an app which calls an api service to get a value and update it in a dashboard.

The html code is as below,

<div class="span3" ng-controller="rookieController">
<div class="chart" ng-attr-data-percent="{{count}}"> {{count}} </div>
<div class="chart-bottom-heading"><span class="label label-info">Rookie</span>

The result is,

The ´{{count}}´ gets evaluated to a value in the outerhtml but the ´{{count}}´ in the innerhtml doesn't get evaluated. I debugged the code and when I add a breakpoint the innerHTML ´{{count}}´ gets evaluated.

This is kind of confusing. I think it is because the data is not loaded when the innerHTML is rendered, but then I tried evaluating the expression way before it is called in this tag and it evaluated perfectly. Then the data loading theory doesnt add up.

Actually the data-percent value is given as input to easypiechart jquery, since the jquery triggers before the data is available it doesn't animate.

Can someone explain on how this whole rendering thing works. Any help would be deeply appreciated.

The controller code,

opsApp.controller('rookieController',function($scope,$http) {

        .success(function(data) {

                    $scope.count = data;

        .error(function(data) {
            console.log('Error: ' + data);


Update: Jquery where the directive is evaluated,

 $.easyPieChart = function(el, options) {
          var addScaleLine, animateLine, drawLine, easeInOutQuad, renderBackground, renderScale, renderTrack,
            _this = this;
          this.el = el;
          this.$el = $(el);
          this.$"easyPieChart", this);
          this.init = function() {
            var percent;
            _this.options = $.extend({}, $.easyPieChart.defaultOptions, options);
            percent = parseInt(_this.$'percent'), 10);

The line

percent = parseInt(_this.$'percent'), 10);

is where the attribute is getting evaluated.

share|improve this question
What do you mean by the outerHTML vs the innerHTML? – Explosion Pills Dec 19 '13 at 14:37
I assume ng-attr-data-percent is a directive you've written yourself? In most cases, unless the directive expects a string you shouldn't use double brackets. I.e, most directives takes a model somedir=model" – KG Christensen Dec 19 '13 at 14:37
@ExplosionPills - innerHTML is the text within html tags and the outerHtml means the between tags – jperiasw Dec 19 '13 at 15:56
@KGChristensen:Thanks KG , I tried this as well. – jperiasw Dec 19 '13 at 16:21
Okay, but is the directive your own or something you've found? To help you we need to see the directive code. Your problem is due to expression resolving, how the directive handles that is key to figuring out a solution. – KG Christensen Dec 19 '13 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

It should be like this:

<div class="chart" ng-attr-data-percent="count"> {{count}} </div>
share|improve this answer
I have tried this as well but it doesn't work. As I mentioned it refers to the way the DOM is rendered by Angular. But it is strange 1.{{count}} before my intended html in the body it gets evaluated properly 2.{{count}} within the attribute value doesnt evaluate but when I debug it, it gets loaded – jperiasw Dec 19 '13 at 15:58


I have got the problem : It is actually the angular controller loading the data late.

  1. The GET for HTML gets fired and the HTML rendering starts
  2. I have defined the angular app and then an angular controller around the <div>. The controller fires a GET for the API
  3. Now before the controller can return the data to $scope, the jquery for the chart gets called and it sees an undefined value for the expression {{count}}

An ugly hack: I used the setTimeout function to call the jquery to fire approx 500ms afterwards. I know it is downright ugly but since I am learning angular now and I have not quite wrapped my head around $q and $promise. Still if somebody can suggest some elegant solutions, I will be glad. Thanks everybody for the help though. Appreciate it.

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