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Can somebody clarify me how global (:h :g) and norm (:h norm) commands are working in VIM? I have file:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H

I have issued :g/[0-9]/norm 4gg dd hoping that it will work in following maner:

  1. [0-9] = match only lines with numbers
  2. 4gg = jump to 4th line
  3. dd = delete current (4th) line

So I was expecting this:

1
2
3
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H

But instead of it I get:

1
2
3
4
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H

Also it does not matter if I use norm or norm!, what is the difference, can you please explain me how this is working or point me to some good references, I have read :h :g and :h :norm but it does not help. Thank you

PS: I can use :4d but I am interested in :g and :norm explanation, the problem was mentioned just as simple example.

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4 Answers 4

:g/pattern/do something

will do do something on each line that matches the pattern. so you got that output.

try:

:g/\d/echo getline('.')
:g/\d/echo line('.')

1st line prints the matched line 2nd prints the matched line number.

so you will see for each matched line, vim does something (echo, in this case)

and for the reason, why 4 is till there, because you have a space between 4gg and dd.

Your line with number has only one char, so space will move cursor to next line. that's why 4 won't be deleted.

remove the space!

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Incidentally (and almost entirely unrelated), :g/pattern/do something is where grep got its name: g/regular-expression/print -> g/re/p. –  sanmiguel Dec 19 '13 at 16:09

It means:

For every line that contains any digit between 0 and 9, go to fourth line and delete it. So in first iteration it deletes the number 4, in the next one the number 5 and so on. When cursor begins with lines that don't contain number, it doesn't match and doesn't execute the normal instruction, so it doesn't delete anything.

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This would've been my answer. Unfortunately, this doesn't delete the 4th line. It deletes the fifth line for some reason (you can see in the output the OP gave that the 4 is still there, and I was able to reproduce that behavior). I have no idea why that happens. Do you? –  Cubic Dec 19 '13 at 15:29
    
@Cubic: As I understand it, normal executes its argument without spaces, like: :g/[0-9]/norm 4ggdd and that works correct. With space doesn't work for me, it does nothing. –  Birei Dec 19 '13 at 15:34

:normal

:{range}normal {command}

executes normal mode {command} on every line in {range}. Without {range}, it operates on the current line.

Example:

:5,18normal 0df=

:global

:{range}g/{pattern}/{command}

executes {command} only on lines in {range} that match {pattern}. Without {range}, it operates on the whole buffer.

Examples:

:5,18g/^foo/normal 0df=
:5,18g/^foo/s/^.\{-}=/
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To complete your questions (note that it is bad style to ask several questions (unless tightly related), and you should have been able to resolve most of that through the excellent :help):

The difference between :normal and :normal! is that the former considers mappings, whereas the latter always works on the default Vim commands. Therefore, the former is okay for ad-hoc commands (that make use of your mappings), but the latter is recommended for plugins (to be independent of any mappings).

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